home comfort cook stove ?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ChuckinVA, Oct 1, 2004.

  1. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    Any one familiar with this brand of cook stove ? I have seen them at antique stoves web site but are very expensive. I wonder if they are worth the money for one that was operable ?
     
  2. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    I learned to cook on a Southern Comfort. I wonder if they're a related brand? If so, snatch it up. Ours had a water reservoir, double warming ovens, a working temperature gauge on the oven :eek: and was an easy feeder. It's still sitting in Mom and Dad's barn, waiting for me to come get it. Hubby doesn't want it :no: Even if we can't put it in the house (and we really can't) I think it would be great in the workshop! It's a metal building on a slab, so little fire risk, as long as we kept the sawdust down, and kept the acytelene tank away :D , and at least a warm spot in that cavern.

    Meg :)
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Home Comfort was the old standby back in the 30s. My folks got an electric stove in the 50s. Traded the Home Comfort in on it. The guys that delivered the new stove took it out and busted it up with a maul. My Stepdad nearly cried. It was as good as new.
     
  4. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    I am going to look at one tomorrow. Don't know what kind of shape it is in but I hope it still has some life in it.
     
  5. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    I've have a Home Comfort in storage. I used it more as a back up to a propane stove. If you use "widow wood" it will heat up fast and I could make breakfast of bacon, eggs, toast and coffee, in about the same time as on the propane stove. It's got a pretty small fire box, so needs pretty constant stoking. I tried bread only once, as it took soooooooo long to get it hot enough and I ended up opening the door and windows because of the heat. It's great for stews and beans that simmer most of the day. It will heat a medium size room in a fairly short time. In a shop or home, a box heater would be more practical for heat and you can still put a pot of beans on.
     
  6. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    Thanks LacyJ,
    Good information. The area I want to use it in is about 16 X 20 and it will be secondary heat / cooking.
     
  7. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    If you're wanting to use the oven, then make your stove pipe longer. It may help to increase the draw. The damper on the back of the stove changes the direction that the smoke leaves, to the pipe. It makes the smoke circulate around the oven before exiting the up-pipe. If the roundels seem to be loose in their holes, your stove will leak smoke when you use the oven, because of the change in the draw direction. If your in a cold part of the country, keep some dishes in the warming boxes and your food won't get cold, when it's served...Good place to put tortillas, rolls etc., too...
     
  8. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    Those puppies can throw out the heat!!! I cooked on one for years and really wish I had taken it when we moved. Look for a nice surface and an intact firebox. Some of those old stoves have such damaged cooking surfaces and fire boxes that they simple are not all that useful.
     
  9. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    Well it turns out it was not as advertised. It was not a Home Comfort. It is a W J Loth stove manufactured in Waynesboro, Va which is close by. I bought it at an auction and it will need disassembled, cleaned up and put back together. One of the Roundels is cracked and the storage area above the stove where it mounts to the stove top is broken but I think I can get that fixed. The stove has a lot of pieces that are shiney metal (but a lot of that is rusted) and a lot of pieces that are a bright blue. It will be a pretty stove once I get it back in shape. I bought it for $30.00 so I don't think I got hurt on it.
     
  10. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

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    Great buy. That's about what we pay for old wood heaters. My home comfort cost $175.00, twenty years ago and it doesn't have the water closet. The other cook stove we have cost about $300.00.
     
  11. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    From another post, with updated image, showing veggies grilling on griddle, beans and veggie dogs in the pot. We love our cookstove.

    Alex

     
  12. Jan in CO

    Jan in CO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow, Chuck, great buy! A Home Comfort sold here in Colorado two weeks ago for 1600.00. It was in pretty good shape, too. I'm sure it is worth a lot more, and so was the person who bought it. Said he had a buyer for it for 2400 without doing anything to it. Sigh. Wish I'd been the buyer! Jan in Co
     
  13. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    "btw Our Katie II has a cast iron heat exchanger that is the left fire box liner. We have not hooked that up yet to our hot water system. It will serve as a water pre-heater for our currently electrically heated water after we connect it. "

    Alex,

    Thanks for the encouragement! I like the pic ! The stove I bought also has the cast iron heat exchanger. Did you weld the lift arm or have someone do it for you ? I was wondering if cast iron could be welded as the stove top and two of the roundels have cracks in them. I need pictures of inside the fire box as this stove has a lever on the front that turns a grate and dumps ash to the bottom of the firbox and there was a part in the box of parts that came with it that is a fixed grate. I don't see were it would go but I was thinking it would go above the dump grate some how. It is in two pieces and is missing material between the two pieces so I am assuming this was where the fire was most intense.
     
  14. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    The lifitng handle is not/not welded to the cast iron top (though cast iron can be welded). The handle is attached with a stove bolt. The cast iron top was pre-drilled. However, you can drill yours with no problems. The handle has a spacer-washer in it which keeps the stove bolt (with counter-sunk head) from tightening on the handle too tight.

    The inside grates are a bit tricky to understand. However, once you find out how they work, then it all makes sense. There is a connecting 'ratchet' piece which operates the second grate, the first is rotated by your grate handle - not the same one above.

    There is normally a space between the two grates. The grates on Katie II have two faces - a solid faces for wood - and a slotted face for coal.

    [​IMG]
    This Is Katie II Before She Got Her New Hnadle

    [​IMG]
    After

    [​IMG]
    This Is What The Handle Rests On While Filling With Big Wood

    We got all these parts for next to nothing at 'Y Franks' in Vancouver, including new grates, and firebox pieces, and advice.

    All The Best

    Alex
     
  15. ChuckinVA

    ChuckinVA Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Alex,
    I wish I could find a place like Y Franks close by where I could go in and look at the pieces. Were your Roundels ( Burners ) in good shape? Some of mine (there are 6 ) are cracked and the slot where the need repaired to be able to use effectively. I may try and get them welded as I don't expect to find replacements. I would really like to find a replacement grate but I guess I could get a piece of steel cut to fit. The moveable grate is working fine. I just need the stationary one or the one that is solid. I have begun the proces of taking the stove apart so I can get it sandblasted. Looks like I will have to cut the bolts off as most are too rusted to remove with a wrench. I have sprayed them with PB Blaster and hopefully that will loosen some of them up. I Can't wait to get it put back together and a pot of stew simmering on top...
     
  16. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Chuck, and Others looking for stove parts,

    Y Franks may have a friend in your area. I don't think he is much up-on e-mail. His shop has lots in it and he comes out and magically has what I need and tells me how to install it, and talks down to me sometimes. I think there maybe hidden meanings in his manner, maybe he is thinking, "Why don't you know how that works?" I am sure you can order parts from him, it's a small store, with a big back room and dusty shelves stacked with everything anyone could want for old stoves. I would not wait too long to talk to him, he is getting on.

    New grates are no more expensive than any other item on your stove. Mr. Lethbridge sells all of his products by the pound.

    I did not do too much grinding on Katie II, except where I glued (with high-temperature glue) the new gasket around the top of the stove. I was worried grinding might destroy some of her character. There are treatment procedures to re-blacken the surfaces, see archives, i.e, search, though I guess you know about that.

    Welding is no problem. Though if Mr. Lethbridge (Don) has parts then it is better to get them from him. He is personally an antique collector of stoves and kitchen items, as well as seller of new reproductions from his tiny, non-slick shop.

    Have some fun fixing your stove, and cooking on it (her) (or him for those who would perfer their stove be male - since we are into personification - might as well have all the choices) for many years.

    Do others on this forum, in your area or closer to Chuck, know of any good stove parts supply shops, like Y Franks?

    Alex

    [​IMG]
    He gave me both of these cards, there is only one shop.