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Discussion in 'Sheep' started by shepmom, Jul 26, 2004.

  1. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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    We will have to cull our "herd" ram when the temps get cooler and I was wondering whether it's a must that the carcass must hang a week?

    Is it ok to slaughter and process the meat for the freezer locker, right away?


    Diana
     
  2. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For my money hanging an older Ram probably won't improve the meat quality much. I'd pull the chops and grind the rest to mix with beef for ground meat. Depending on his age he may be a weee bit strong flavored.
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I agree but in general a short 2 or 3 day hang does improve lamb meat. Mutton makes quite good pepperettes.
     
  4. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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    I've heard that our breed of hair sheep as mutton still has a mild flavor.
    The ram will be about 15-16 months old when we cull him.

    So, it's still best to let him hang before going to the freezer locker? I can't remember at the moment, but does it have something to do with rigor mortis? Or.... :confused:
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    If he is properly bled rigor won't be a problem. Hanging simply stretches the tissue so when cut it is relaxed. If you ever have to set a broken leg, stretching the muscle is the first step so it is relaxed and allows the bones to be placed and the break isn't surrounded by tense hard muscle. Relaxed by stretching (hanging) also tenderizes the meat so it isn't tense and hard.
     
  6. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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    Ah, that makes sense.
    I can apply that logic to previous experience with human broken legs in the ER.
     
  7. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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  8. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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    "Suspending the carcass by the aitch bone rather than the Achilles tendon. Stretches the muscles of the round and loin to increase sarcomere length and increase tenderness."

    Would the aitch bone be found to the rear of the carcass, kinda hard to tell by the pics.
     
  9. Never mind. I just ate something to get my energy back up and realized it must be the rear to stretch the loin. duh

    Shepmom
     
  10. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I have read of the tender stretch hang method I think in Paula Simmonds book Raising Sheep the Modern Way.
     
  11. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Rigor mortis is gone by the end of day 2. It is not stretching or relaxing the muscle. The purpose of hanging (assuming you are doing so at temperatures 33-39F) is to allow partial decomposition without rotting to tenderize the meat. You could do the same by packaging the meat immediately and just putting it in the fridge for a week prior to freezing or cooking

     
  12. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I've not heard it being related to rigor but I guess it is at least somewhat. Hanging is to relax the tissue, plain and simple that's why it is called tenderSTRETCH. Beef is tenderized by aging (not just hanging) and yes it is somewhat related to the first stages decomposition, its not generally required or desirable with lamb. I certainly would not hang or keep unfrozen lamb for more than 3 days.
     
  13. BrushBuster

    BrushBuster Well-Known Member

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    hanging meat makes it more tender. whether by stetching or decompision, i ain't got no idea, but would assume both plays a part. but my question is, ain't that a side of beef hanging in those pics?
     
  14. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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    << Rigor mortis is gone by the end of day 2. It is not stretching or relaxing the muscle. The purpose of hanging (assuming you are doing so at temperatures 33-39F) is to allow partial decomposition without rotting to tenderize the meat. You could do the same by packaging the meat immediately and just putting it in the fridge for a week prior to freezing or cooking >>

    Ok, I'll stop debating with dh, he said that's why he packs the deer meat in an ice chest for 3-4 days before we freeze. :D
     
  15. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    what's a(re) pepperettes

     
  16. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Little snack sized pepperoni sticks? Perhaps I spelled it incorretly? Quite nice done as mutton or lamb, I sell quite a few to stores and at the market.
     
  17. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    how are they made? do you use collagen sausage casings? I don't know about the spelling, I'm not familiar with that term.

     
  18. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    You know I likely did know what the casing was to start, and if my butcher comes to the market tomorrow I'll try to remember to ask. Here's a link to show what pepperettes look like (these are not mine) . The ones I have made are NOT preservative free, but do not need refrigeration, as I suspect these do. Pepperettes
     
  19. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Yes they use collagen casings for the pepperettes.
     
  20. shepmom

    shepmom Well-Known Member

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    I was browsing through my book a little while ago [_Storey's Guide to Raisng Sheep_ by Paula Simmons and Carol Ekarius] and found the Texas A&M tenderstretch mentioned in the butchering section.

    The writers say it should be done within the hour of killing and the reason it works is it prevents the shortening of muscle fibers as the carcass passes into rigor mortis.
    If this meat is cooked right away the meat stays tender.
    After rigor mortis sets in the shortened muscles become fixed and rigid. Taking 7-14 days at temps between 28-34 degrees Fahrenheit before the muscles lose their rigidity and become pliable again.

    With tenderstretching right after slaughter, meat is as tenders after 24 hours of chilling, as if it were aged for a full week. Further aging improves the tenderness.