Home business ideas with a barn?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by happy@home, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. happy@home

    happy@home Well-Known Member

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    We have the opportunity to buy the neighbors barn and a field adjacent to it, it's closer to our house than to his and he is getting up in years and would rather have money than a barn. Anyway, if we get it I'd want to start some sort of home business. I don't want to raise animals, I have to be available at a moments notice to take care of aging parents and can't leave animals unattended. I considered a vegetable market, we would have plenty of land to plant and the barn would work for the stand but would take a tremendous amount of work to get it ready for that. We've thought about renting out the barn a field but would anyone want to rent it? I've considered raising bees for honey but dh is allergic to bee stings so that would mean the kids and I would have to do the work, how heavy is the lifting involved? Any other ideas?
     
  2. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    You could store cars and boats in it for the winter--with insurance, of course. There's a pretty penny to be made doing that.
     

  3. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    I'm with Fin on this one... there are a number of barns around here that rent space to people with antique cars or boats. But you'd need to do your homework as to the insurance and fire regs.
     
  4. pamintexas

    pamintexas Well-Known Member

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    If you're not too far out in the boonies, an antique store may do well. Most of the dealers/shops I'm familiar with pretty much set their own hours and buy a lot of their merchandise at auctions, garage sales and thrift shops. You could start small, build up your business and maybe set up a vegetable stand nearby at a later date if you decide to plant the land
     
  5. fellini123

    fellini123 Well-Known Member

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    I dont know a lot about bees, but I wouldnt think they were THAT heavy!!!

    Ok Ok I know I'm not much help, just being a smart A**!! Good luck on whatever you do.
    Alice in Virginia
     
  6. happy@home

    happy@home Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the ideas, please keep them coming. We had considered winter storage too. Half the barn would be useful for that, the other half is still full of stantions and would need something done with the floor to fill it in and level it.

    I guess the bees wouldn't be too heavy! I gues that did sound funny the way I wrote it. I was thinking more about the weight of the frames etc.... We could use the milkhouse for storing and putting honey in jars and all but I would have to do a lot of research on bees before I went that route anyway.
     
  7. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    remodel the barn into housing and move your folks into it.... then they are closer, costs are less, and it is the way Almighty God intended the family to do things. Make a room where you can make craft items, wrap them up and ship them out after selling them on ebay or other internet sites...

    wholly it would depend on your own limitations of what you can do, the population locally if you intend to provide a service to locals.

    A small nursery business could also be done using the barn as a sort of green house starter [slight remodeling would be needed]..... see plant propagation to see if you would be able to do this type of business in your area....

    Imagination, to get a good idea that is serviceable for you.... probably you need to figger out a hundred ideas and work through them to the breakevn point on paper.... once you get in that grtoove then it is easy to see if it is a business you want to persue..... sounds harsh, but it is really simple, not everyone is cut out to be a huge business owner, but nearly everyone can make a little on the side so to speak to pay for things they want, hobby becomes a parttime business becomes a full time monster becomes a a salable business for something to retire on.... ok maybe not everyone.

    William
     
  8. happy@home

    happy@home Well-Known Member

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  9. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Use the barn for just about anything you are good at making, servicing, or apply your trade there in a shop.
    For example, a barn can be partitioned into shop or crafting space for gunsmithing if you are adept to learn that lucrative trade. Other ideas.....small engine repair shop, fabricating with machine lathing equipment, wood crafting, raise worms.....stuf like that.
     
  10. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Regarding bees....

    Imagine haveing an empty hive body. Now imagine removing the frames of honey ONE FRAME AT A TIME and setting it in the empty hive body that is already in the cart.

    Eliminating lifting takes a LOT longer, but those of us whose names are not Arnold Shwartzen-something might prefer it. A deep box with 10 full frames weighs about 90 pounds.

    As for your DH's bee-sting allergy: has he been tested for it? My lifelong bee allergy turned out to be a yellow jacket allergy instead. I have been cleared to have bees. I have 3 hives now and have a couple more on order for the spring.
     
  11. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Boarding horses, with the understanding that you don't do any of the caretaking? The horse folks around here seem to have an unlimited supply of money...
     
  12. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

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    Read two books by Sue Hubbel: A Country Year, and A Book of Bees.

    She had/has a very successful bee bzzness. The books are pure pleasure to read whether you are interested in bees or not. Could probably find them used on the internet sites.
     
  13. ckncrazy

    ckncrazy Well-Known Member

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    You could plant Christmas trees, Almost everyone puts one up at Christmas.