home brew

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ratherbefishin, Dec 18, 2004.

home brew

  1. good?

  2. bad ?

  3. indiferent?

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  1. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    I've made some homebrew that wasn't too bad, and some that was too bad[used that in cooking]Anybody have any comments-and has anybody used those beer kegs where you just left it right in the keg[used a co2 cartridge I believe]
     
  2. Old John

    Old John Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Y'all,

    I've been brewing for 40, yup, forty years. I use to make wine.
    About 12 years ago I began brewing Beer, Ales & Lagers.
    I use 5 gal. carboys. And I always do single stage brewing.
    I have NEVER had a bad batch of Beer.
    And, since I learned how easy it is to sweeten and balance Wines,
    I make much better Wines. However, Wines that are a little "off" make
    very passable sangria. Equal amounts of Wine, and pineapple & apple juice.

    Presently I'm brewing about 40 gal of Beer a year and about
    30 gal. of Mead. Most of the Mead is straight Mead.
    I do make a Cyser occasionally, but no Melomels.
    My favorite Mead is Brackett, which is Brewed with part Malt, the
    rest Honey.That gives it a whole different character.

    We like medium brown Lagers, with an occasonal Bock or Stout.
    Most of the Friends like the Medium Brown. I use about 7# of Malt
    Extract and 1# of Crystal Malt. Makes a nice wholesome drinkable beer.

    Most of Friends & Family like Sweet Mead. So, that's how I make it.
    Wild Flower Honey is best. But, Clover Honey is good & easier to find.
    We get together once a month for a dinner and 2 or 3 bottles of
    home-brew. Makes for a nice evening.

    Oh, I never tried it in kegs. I bottle-condition all my beers. I use a
    level cup of corn sugar, to condtion a 5 gal. batch.
    It keeps well in bottles. I have 18 cases, that I recycle each time
    I try to keep them mostly full.

    A good strong Stout takes at least a year to mellow out
    and get smoo-oo-ooth.
    Nothing like a good strong sweet-stout and a pipeful of good
    aromatic tobacco, to relax with after dinner, or before going
    to bed.
    Deja Brew, hunnh.
    Have a good-un, now.
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I like the fact you can make a drinkable low alcohol beer and dark ales as good as anyones at home for pennies. I also make wines all from kits and have only had a couple of batches that were a little odd. I've been trying the two part fruit wines latley and am impressd. My wife likes sweet wines so she's thrilled with the production of late! I've used and still have the beer kegs and co2 cartriges systems. They were just too fussy to fool with.
     
  4. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    I've had better luck at''u-brew'' shops- a bit more expensive, but the wine is good-no failures yet.Costs about$3-$4 a bottle.The Canadian government sees beer and wine as a money tree-so with any decent wine costing $10 -$12 a bottle its cheaper to make your own.I haven't made beer there, or cider, but understand it's good.
    I'd like to try a beer at home though-my father[who's gone 22 years now ] made his own beer-grew his own hops in the backyard, and they still come up evey spring.
     
  5. jerneeon

    jerneeon Well-Known Member

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    The only thing I've ever made is kalua. It was yummy.
     
  6. Litsa

    Litsa Member

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    A beer system like that is really only good for making a light, not overly hopped, young beer. Anything stronger or expected to be stored for a time will get off flavors from the must at the bottom (dead yeast). It's a great method for making a quick and easy, big party batch that will be drank in one night. But for a smooth, rich and beautiful beer experience use the traditional methods and age it nicely.
     
  7. Litsa

    Litsa Member

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    Fresh hops are great, use them if you can. But, just the female buds - before fertilization. They're cheap and easy to grow, but expensive to buy, on account of the trouble it takes to collect the good ones.
     
  8. Nancy in Maine

    Nancy in Maine Well-Known Member

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    I've been making beer and wine for 15+ years now. I started out with one of those beer kits--the ones with the malt syrup in a can and some yeast. You add your own water and sugar. It was so easy and good, I've never tried any other method. I prefer the brown ales, the darker the better. Made stout once and liked it! I can't get down a bottle of store bought beer, even the "quality" beers are inferior to home brew. I planted a hops vine once with the intention of using the flowers in beer, but I never did. The vine is getting to be a monster! It makes quite an ornamental.

    My wines, on the other hand are ......ummm......interesting. I make "country" wines, such as chokecherry, blackberry, elderberry, etc. Some are quite good, others take a bit of bravery to drink.

    In beer and winemaking, we have learned you can't use chlorinated water. It gives a nasty flavor to the brew.
     
  9. jefferson

    jefferson fuzzball in the Cascades

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    I, too, make my own beer. Never had a bad one (some are better than others). I used to bottle, but the cleanning just got to be too much. I now keg and am enjoying just going to my kegerator and puling on the tap. I am looking for a good (cheap) thermostat for the kegerator so I can brew into summer.
     
  10. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    dad used to pick the buds and sundry them on a flat pan then make a ''tea '' out them as I recall.
     
  11. Litsa

    Litsa Member

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    Yes, exactly! Add the hop tea to your 'wort' in boil, not the whole hops, or it brings too much bitterness that masks the aromas and can create a haze in the beer.
     
  12. ibcnya

    ibcnya Well-Known Member

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    A fellow jarhead gave me a brewing kit complete with a capper, glass jug and all. I even saved up a bunch of those green Grolsch beer bottles with the wire cap to make my own brew. Man, I need help in this area. I like beer and Natural Ice is starting to get an edge to it.
     
  13. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I know some old boys who homebrew. Of course they do it with various copper tubing, stainless steel vats, boilers, lots of corn and sugar and a good supply of mason jars.........

    It'll make you spit and holler. Or so I've been told. Ahem.
     
  14. flutemandolin

    flutemandolin mark an eight, dude!

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    I used to homebrew, haven't lately, but with the price of a six pack of good beer $7 and up I might have to start brewing again. The hop tea gave me an idea...I wonder if you could add some of that straight to a glass of cheap beer to hop it up a bit?

    I always bottled my beer. I think the crud at the bottom of the fermenter would give it too strong a taste if you kept it in the same container the whole time.
     
  15. jack_c-ville

    jack_c-ville Well-Known Member

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    Huh? I've been brewing for about 9 years, have read dozens of books about brewing and I have never, ever heard of or observed that. The only time a 'hop tea' seems to make sense is if the beer is found to be underhopped at bottling/kegging and you want to tweak it a little.

    I use whole hops in every wort boil and my beers are not hazy. Nor are beers made by Speakeasy, Stone, 3 Floyds, Brooklyn or North Coast - all of whom add their hops directly to the boil and make the best beers in America.

    Bitterness does not 'mask the aromas.' The bitterest beers in the world with over 100 IBUs (although the human tongue can only sense up to around 75 IBUs) still have incredible aroma. The Stone Brewing company's 'Ruination IPA' is a perfect example under the most extreme circumstances. Brewed with whole hops, over 100 IBUs and more aroma than any other beer I've encountered. Pick up a bottle and see what I mean.

    I don't think that making a hop tea and adding it to the wort can do any real harm. I'm sure that your beer is great. But nor do I believe that there is any point to it. Certainly it would complicate the matter of the hop schedule. Good recipes will state how many minutes from the end of the boil each addition of hops are tossed in. I've brewed plenty of beers that had 4 or 5 seperate additions and I've only got but so many burners on the stove.

    -Jack