home birth-hospital birth

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ratherbefishin, Dec 26, 2004.

preferance birthing

  1. home

  2. hospital

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  1. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    what would you choose?My friend [now deceased] was a surgeon and said he had seen ennough unforseen complications that he was very glad to have a fully complete OR ,just for those very rare cases when he needed it.Said he had almost lost a woman due to hemmoraging-right in the hospital and had she opted for a home birth, they would have lost her.He was hoewver, happy with midwives- said they had far more expericance than most GP's
    He had also a lot of expericance in remote regions, and said most native women had far fewer complications.
     
  2. reese

    reese Well-Known Member

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    I've had 2 children the hospital way and one that was practically a homebirth (car birth). In hindsight I'd much rather have the homebirth than a hospital dr. birth where i"m not allowed to birth as my instincts dictate. In hindsight I know I would have had FAR less complications with my first birth had I been allowed to birth as I needed to not as the medical staff and dr. insisted I do it.

    BUT one must choose what they are most comfortable with.
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    All my boys were welcomed into the world at home. We always sought out excellent pre-natal care under a mid-wife though, and usually had the mid-wife in attendance to help us out. Our mid-wives were always excellently trained and for the most part, did have more experience than most GP's. All were trained in advanced medical techniques and I'm confident that they could even do an emergency C-section if it was necessary, although none admitted the capability.

    Each of the births was special and memorable and we wouldn't have had it any other way.
     
  4. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    I've had three babies in the hospital...the last 24 years ago...the first 34 years ago....if I had it to do over I might choose home birth...

    The first time I was in the hospital, the nurse almost let our baby choke to death in the nursery....
    the second time I was having the second baby the woman in the room with me gave birth in the BATHROOM and the baby died.....and there was a big lawsuit....

    By the third baby I switched hospitals and was in labor way to long for a third birth but it was because I hadn't gotten as much exercise as I did with the first two and some other complications.....

    But we were a homeschooling family and do a lot of home churching and now feel home birth would be the way to go....even tho I am a big chicken!
     
  5. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    All three of our daughters were born at home by choice with midwives in attendance.

    For the first, all went well, with the minor complications of a cord around the neck (handled skillfully by the midwife and some tearing, taken care of at the ER.

    The second happened even quicker than the first, and in the tub.

    The third happened even quicker than second (less than two hours) and the midwife's assistant was walking in the door while my wife was giving birth. Five minutes later and I would have delivered the baby.

    I'm all for it, but believe everyone should make an informed choice.

    The poster who wrote about hospitals going against the natural instincts of the mother was right on. My wife ate when she wanted to, moved where she wanted to and gave birth in the position she wanted to. The midwives were extremely attentive.

    Of course the hospital has to worry about lawsuits, where most people who opt for homebirth are not likely the types that would sue unless there was extreme negligence.
     
  6. Wags

    Wags Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It really depends on the hospital. Some of them are horrible about letting a mother do what she instincitvely feels is best.

    Hopsitals that are certified "mother friendly" AND "baby friendly" are the greatest thing around IMHO. Quite frequently they are staffed by nurse-midwives and have a whole different take on the birth experience. I was fortunate to give birth (urgent c-section) at such a hospital 8 months ago and will probably end up back there for the next one even though it is 3 hrs away from us now that we've moved. (Heck, they even encourage "alternative" birthing methods - like Hypnobirthing and water births.)

    In most hospitals c-seciton moms are housed in the regular surgery wards, and their babies taken off to a nursery. But at a mother friendly hospital moms and their baby (who never leaves the room without mom or dad with them) are in the birth center propper so that they can receive the same care as any other mother. Breastfeeding is highly encouraged with at least one (or more) lactation consultants on staff and making rounds regularlly.

    Home births are great for uncomplicated pregnancies, but if things aren't going smoothly, a mother/baby friendly birth center is the next best thing.
     
  7. CarlaWVgal

    CarlaWVgal Well-Known Member

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    I wish I could have had a home birth, but I am cursed with a uterine septum, which causes preterm labor. My first was born at 28 weeks, so after that I was told to "forget" about it, and justifiably so. I was going to try for a homebirth with my fourth child, if I could make it to 37 weeks, but she came at 35 weeks, and was frank breech, so I had an emergency c-section.

    I would think that if a woman is more comfortable being at home, then it's the way to go. With good prenatal care, most complications are known before hand, like placenta previa (causes hemorraging) or breech, or an extremely large baby, and any midwife would recommend a hospital (and an OB) in a high risk situation.

    And I've got to agree with wags, finding a hospital that will let you do what you need to to feel comfortable is a big help. You would not belive how different one hospital is from another.

    Carla
     
  8. HoosierDeb

    HoosierDeb Well-Known Member

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    I had my son in the hospital by c-section. I'm convinced he'd still be in there (he's 19 now) if we'd left it up to him so I guess that's where I needed to be. My SIL had the first ones at hospitals and the last 2 or 3... can't remember which.. they have 7, at home. I know she preferred home birth. She was attended by an Amish midwife who delivered lots of the Amish babies in the area.
     
  9. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    I would have loved a home birth but I tell you what if I had not been a hospital I would have died.....I died anyways but because I was at the hospital they saved me. For my second birth I had a mid-wife I got to plan out my birth MY way and she held to it I was scared to death to have another child esp. trying to go vaginally I did it thanks to my mid iwfe and family!!! I lost a lot of blood again and they thought I was going to have problems again but this time I was ok. So If you can get a mid-wife I say hospital all the way...I just liked they way the mid-wife handled everything better than my doc. did no offense to any doctors I just like the mid-wifes bed side manner and compassion much better :)
     
  10. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    my wife and daughter have had their babies in hospital- no complications.I have no doubt they could have had them at home- and the atmosphere would have been better,although I have no problem at all with the care both of them received.
    However- that isn't the question- the question is- how would you feel if something went dreadfully wrong, and you had opted NOT to have full OR facilities available, and because of that decision, you either lost the mom , or baby, or the baby had serious brain damage due to oxygen deficiencies, simply because you decided it would be more comfortable at home?I know the chances are small of this happening- but if it happens to you, the chances are 100%, and you have to live with the decision.Women still die in childbirth.
     
  11. jerneeon

    jerneeon Well-Known Member

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    I used to assist a friend of mine who taught LaMaz classes, and often helped some of the women who either didn't have a birth partner to be with them during the delivery or whose spouse or partner needed a 'break' from the labor. What I saw convinced me that I would NEVER want to have a home birth. About 70 percent of all the births where I was present had some sort of complication. Some were not life threatening, but could easily have turned that way had it been a home birth without all the hospital 'stuff' there. Lethargic babies, prolapsed cord, shoulder dystocia (not sure of the spelling), and an endless number of complications could have caused some health complications at the very least.
     
  12. limhyl

    limhyl Well-Known Member

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    I guess I'm wondering what your point is. It sounds to me like you have some negative notions about birthing at home that you are not revealing. Women do die in childbirth but very rarely and delivering in a hospital does not guarantee a healthy mother and baby. To insinuate that a women is somehow selfish to want to have a private, personal birth experience is very offensive to me.

    Women die in car accidents but that doesn't mean they should not drive. They take precautions like wearing their seatbelts and keeping their cars in good order and they must take the same care if they decide to attempt a home birth. Educating themselves, exercising, not smoking and selecting an experienced birth practioner all will decrease the likelyhood of delivery complications. When a person decides to have a home birth they should be making an informed decision. There are risks at home and at a hospital however, if you look at the statistics home birth, when performed by an experienced practitioner, is much safer for mother and baby than a hospital birth, including a hospital birth by a midwife. Mostly this is due to the fact that only healthy, low risk women usually deliver at home. If a high risk patient desired a home birth usually the aforementioned competent practioner would steer them toward the hospital for their own safety. I am a labor and delivery nurse with ten years of experience and in all of that time I have never had a mother die nor had it happen at a hospital where I worked so this reflects how rare maternal death is. However I have seen many, many damaged babies due to a variety of causes not the least of which was unwarrented medical intervention which would not happen at home.

    So the bottom line is this: If you are low risk, you are safer to deliver at home but that's no guarantee something terrible won't happen. Perfectly healthy women can have terrible complications that result in their death in or out of the hospital but as I've said these cases are very rare. I think most people who opt for home birth know these risks and accept them. Theresa.
     
  13. motivated

    motivated Well-Known Member

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    Of course Im always interested in this type of thread. I appreciate all of your views. Maybe I can shed a bit of light. As a licensed midwife here in CA and having worked in surgery for 13 years I would like you to be informed that the OR is not always available at an instant. The rooms may be all in use or the staff may need to be called in from home depending where you live. I used to work in a large Santa Monica Hospital and when the OR crew was "ON CALL" you were allowed to be 20 minutes away. When you got in to the hospital and set up for the Emergency C-Section 25-40 minutes easily could have gone by and did-frequently. I have nothing against hospitals and work in a large clinic now but in the 10 years of homebirths I can say that I understand why many families prefer home. Anyone who attends births in any type of setting better be ready, able and equipped to handle emergencies. People who are considering out of hospital birth need to know exactly the credentials and training that their caregiver has as well as their backup plans. Having a wonderful backup MD was a gift that I had ,although I needed to consult with him rarely. BTW most competent homebirth midwives carry neonatal resuscitation equipment, IV eqipment, oxygen etc. and should have an assistant who is also fully trained in resuscitation. Working many times 1 hour or more from a hospital I have dealt with many variations of normal labors and thankfully have had the training and skills to take care of the problems. JMHO. A good book on the subject Homebirth by Sheila Kitzinger . Homebirth is ideally for low-risk normal women.
     
  14. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    well,as I said, my friend was a a surgeon in remote northern communities,and he said most aboriginal women seemed to have fewer complications and delivered at home, but equally said he had been present at''normal'' births where things went wrong very quickly.He had high praise for midwives and said they had more experiance in birthing than most MD's- and he himself was only called in when a surgeon was required.
    But- the question is- do you deliberately decide on NOT availing yourself of full medical fascilities, should they be required?Some Hospitals have come a long way in making hospital births as ''homelike'' as possable, right downto ''homelike'' furniture and bedroom decor.I remember the days when husbands were considered ''sick'' for wanting to be with their wives during delivery[an opinion I also shared until it was our turn- then I did an about face and am totally in favour of it-a part of the family bonding experiance I wouldn't be without]
     
  15. annethcz

    annethcz Well-Known Member

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    And the fact is, for a low-risk, healthy woman, homebirth is just as safe (if not safer) than hospital birth. Both in terms of maternal and neonatal morbidity (injury) and mortality (death). Read the literature.

    Not only is being at home more comfortable for mom, but there are good reasons to stay out of hospitals. There are many risks & complications that can result from 'routine' hospital procedures- increased risks of interventions and c-sections. It should also be noted that there are a lot of sick people in hospitals- I personally wouldn't want to expose my newborn to all of those germs, including strains of antibiotic-resistant staph. You also are more likely to be attended by hospital staff members who don't know you or your medical history, and treat all patients to the 'lowest common demoninator.' (for example, requiring that your newborn be treated with eye cream to prevent the transmission of STDs, even if the mother has no history of the disease)

    Neither home or hospital birth is without risk. That much is clear. Different sets of risk are inherant with each location. With homebirth, you risk an emergency that requires surgery or other medical intervention. With hospital birth, you risk the possibility of unneccesary interventions (including unneccesary ceasarean sections), the risk of contracting a disease at the hospital.

    I am glad that hospitals exist. They are wonderful, life-saving institutions. However, pregnancy is not an illness and should not be treated as such. Hospitals are great for high-risk births. But there is no statistical advantage for normal, low risk (read= most) women to give birth in hospitals. (A Thinking Woman's Guide to Better Birth by Henci Goer is a great place to start, if you're interested in a layperson's guide to current obstetrical literature).

    The United States currently ranks 27th in the world for neonatal mortality. We are at the bottom of the pack when it comes to the percentage of our babies who die in the neonatal period. There are 2nd world countries who outrank us. We also are quickly approaching a third of all mothers giving birth by c-section. The nationwide average is now around 30%. CRAZY. Despite what we are told, the USA is not the best or safest place to give birth. Not even close. And what do many of the other countries who rank higher have in common? Midwifery care and homebirth are the norm. Birth is treated not as a medical event to be managed, but a normal physiological process.

    In short, to answer your question, NO I do not believe that women should be required to birth in a hospital just because the powers that be believe that there is some sort of advantage to that form of birth.

    (BTW- I know that I'm relatively new to this forum. I've been lurking here for many, many months, and have learned a whole lot. I stayed out of the breastfeeding in public thread, but I just couldn't let this one go. There are just too many misconceptions about the 'safety' of hospital birth and the 'dangers' of birth center and homebirth. I do intend to stay around and contribute wherever I feel I have sufficient knowledge to do so.)
     
  16. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I worked in a large hospitals maternity ward in this state in the late 70's and the experience almost made me leave the field of nursing.

    Staff would routinely be pulled from the nursery to work med surge floors off the record on the midnight shift, then return to the nursery to give the 5 a.m. feeding and chart like they had been there all night. The night supervisor routinely bottled all breastfed babies, even the one or two with big DANGER! NO FORMULA! SEVERE ALLERGIES IN FAMILY ordersd and signs all over the isolette. Her excuse was "These babies are not going to starve to death on MY shift"! Awake and educated mothers hoping for Lamaze deliveries were strapped down and given injections of demerol. And if the maternity wing called an emergency, it took hours for staff to show- whereas if the ER statpaged a doctor for an obstetrical emergency they were in the hospital racing the patient to ER within 1/2 hour.

    And the horrible GERMS that are resistant to everything including the next generations of antibiotics! These live in hospitals. Your average homebound germ is still sensitive to lysol, vinegar and bleach, and you formulate antibodies against your germs and pass them thru the placenta to your baby in 72 hours from exposure.
    I do hospice nursing now, and have assessed many patients who had a minor invasive/surgical procedure such as a cardiac catheterization, with complete correction of the minor problem but the patient comes down with a virulent resistant infection. After 6-9 months of multiole antibiotic treatments and supportive care when organs begin to shut down, the pastient is finally referred to hospice, cured of whatever minor problem he had, but killed by an infection that was introduced by the minor procedure. Babies are not exempt from multiple AB resistant germs in the hospital- they may be more at risk.

    I had my 2 at home back in the 70s, before I became a nurse. I had excellent prenatal care by my midwives and loved having my daughter with me for her brother's birth. She grew up and had her 2 at home. The first one didn't pink up right away- slight rattle, hand/feet dusky, no serious problems. The midwife deleed him of 2 appliances full of mucus, wrapped him and showed my daughter how to hold the oxygen to his face. Within 15 minutes he was fine and pink to his tiny nails. In a hospital- he would've gone to NICU for IV antibiotics with the risks of Cdiif, superbug infection, and necrotizing intestinal disease.
    I vote for home birth.
    We change the world one family at a time.
     
  17. Wags

    Wags Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Although things have changed A LOT in the last 30+ years, there are still some hospitpals that come close to the above. That is why it is so important to research your hosiptal options before you need them. I just had a midwife recommend a hospital to me - but that hospital puts c-section women in the surgical ward. And that is something I don't want, (higher risk of contacting a staff infection) so I won't be using them. Many hospitals have birth centers that may or may not be part of the hospital building itself, but are always close by for emergency care. These are sort of an inbetween place - not quite home, but not a hospital either. They can be a good option for mom's wanting to try water births, who don't have access to a portable birthing tub.
     
  18. jillianjiggs

    jillianjiggs Well-Known Member

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    Most of the hospitals in this area are either recently built or recently remodeled. All but one that I know of, and even that one is in the process of being remodeled, and another birthing center is being built to handle the growing population in the area. Most provide large birthing suites with a full size bed, a hide-a-bed, a table and chairs, tv, and private bathroom with shower. My sister gave birth at two different hospitals, one a vaginal birth in a birthing suite, the other a C-section at another hospital with a NICU just in case it was needed. The newer hospital was awesome, we all got to be a part of the birth, and the parents like it more. Dad even got to stay with her. At the older hospital, they stacked moms up 4 to a room, with one bathroom, and one or two showers per WING. It was uncomfortable for everyone.

    That said, I know because of a risk of complications that I should give birth at a hospital, or at least a birthing center instead of at home. We're not planning on having kids for a couple years, but we've looked into the different hospitals available to us for both OB care and delivery. Luckily we're just about 30 minutes from all of them.
     
  19. Frontier_oaks

    Frontier_oaks Well-Known Member

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    even though I havent had any childern yet it would be my hope to have my child at home with a midwife and not at the hospital. But if i was in a high risk catagory or had an emergency I am only 20 min away from the hopstial and 10 away from a birthing center that is run by midwifes and had all of the high tech gizzmos to make sure that my little one is ok
     
  20. motivated

    motivated Well-Known Member

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    Hencis Book" A thinking womans guide to a better birth " is very good "Obstetric Myths vs Research Realities" goes even furthur into the research and is very well grounded.
    Over the years I have heard all sorts of pro and con arguments for hospital, birth center and home settings. Every woman should be informed of the pros and cons of all settings and left to decide what is best for her. There is no one way to give birth but rather many choices, women who give birth in all settings are to be listened to, respected, and honored.
    Jodi