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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an attempt to eat better this year, I have been studying about soaked grain breads.

For those of you who are not familiar with this concept, it involves soaking the flour overnight with vinegar, whey or yogurt. This supposedly makes the nutrition in whole grains more available by breaking down or eliminating phytic acid. This is what coats the grains and can absorb certain minerals from your body.

I have my first loaf in the bread machine. It's looking good so far, but I'll let you know how it turns out, if anyone is interested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay two minutes to go!

DW was doubtful we had used enough yeast since it didn't raise much until the third rise cycle.

I just checked it a few minutes ago and it had slightly collapsed on the top.

The beeper just went off, so I'll get it out and see how I did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The bread turned out very well overall. It has a good crust and is very light and airy inside for a whole wheat bread.

It is slightly bitter. Could this could have been a result of using less-than-fresh whole wheat flour? We just bought a grain mill and future recipes will be made with freshly ground flour.

I may add some honey next time, as well, since I like bread slightly sweet and the kids probably will appreciate that.

The recipe is below with comments added.

I don't remember what web site I got it from but the recipe is courtesy of Deb Gully of Kilbirnie, New Zealand.

Bread Machine Bread

150 ml (1/2 cup plus 2 T) yogurt- I used homemade goat milk yogurt which was over 8 months old!

200 ml (scant 3/4 cup) water- I used filtered tap water.

450 g (1 lb.) wholemeal flour, less 3 T- I used store-bought WW flour with some store-bought WW pastry flour to finish off the pound. The original recipe was designed for spelt flour.

1 3/4 t yeast granules- I used 2 t on DW's advice

3 T arrowroot powder

1 t Celtic sea salt (fine)- I used Redmond Real Salt

1 T molasses- I used store-bought

2 T butter- I used store-bought

Weight the flour and take back out 3 T. Mix that 3 T with the yogurt and water, then add to remaining flour. Mix to form a dough (I used a Kitchenaid mixer). Cover and leave in a warmish place for 18-24 hours (I let it go for about 19 hours).

I didn't follow the exact directions at this point, but I put the butter (melted), the molasses and the salt into the bottom of the machine. I then added the dough and sprinkled the yeast and arrowroot on top of the dough.

Set machine to a wholemeal setting and begin.

Monitor the kneading to make sure all ingredients get mixed (I kind of manipulated the dough around as it kneaded, but I may not have needed to. I am new to using the machine).

If the consistency is slimy, add some arrowroot. If it's too dry, add water by drops.

For the lactose-intolerant, Deb Gully recommends using olive oil in instead of butter and lemon juice or cider vinegar instead of yogurt (but keep the total liquid amounts the same).

Good job Deb Gully!!!
 

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Thank you for the report, sounds like it turned out ok
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've got dough for two more loaves "soaking" right now, so I can get a jump on my family. That bread from yesterday was gone by bedtime (I ate most of it myself!).

My next project is making a natural, whole wheat sourdough starter.
 
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