Holstien is scouring

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JR05, Jun 2, 2005.

  1. JR05

    JR05 Well-Known Member

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    I am a goat person and have a 4 year old holstein ready to birth anyday. Problem is she is scouring alot more than I would think is ok. She is already bagged out and is walking like she is in pain. This is only her second calf so we aren't knowledgeable about cow births. The beef cows do it on their own and didn't have any problems. When goats are ready to kid they don't scour like this so I would like to know is this normal for dairy cows? Or is it something I need to get the vet out for???

    JR05
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi JR,
    Cows don't scour - that is a word that covers the digestive problems associated with calves. Adult animals suffer from diarrhoea and that can be brought about by a host of different problems.

    Personally, I wouldn't worry about the runny poohs too much. It's spring where you are so she is probably getting a flush of fresh grass on top of which she has a calf squashing up her insides. My cows often get runny close to calving. When was she last wormed?
    She probably isn't in pain but is very uncomfortable with a calf on the inside and a large udder getting in the way of her legs on the outside.
    Feed her some hay on a daily basis which may help to bind her up a bit and if she hasn't been drenched, consider doing so before she calves. Other than that, just keep an eye on her. If she has gone to a bull in keeping with her breed and size, there is no reason why she shouldn't calve with the ease of the beef cows or your goats.

    Good luck and I hope she produces a little boomer for you.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. JR05

    JR05 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your advice. Hubby wanted to stop feeding everyone hay because the pastures are very green,so she isn't getting the ruffage that she normally got. And no, we haven't drenched her because she is prego and didn't know what to use and how much. She is about 1600# and the 2-3 cc we give the goats isn't going to cut it! What wormers are ok for prego cows,I know there are restrictions for goats but...?

    JR05
     
  4. Christina R.

    Christina R. Well-Known Member

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    When I was looking for a wormer for my gal, I couldn't find anyone who knew of one that was okay for a lactating cow (milk withdrawal). I don't know about if that was the same for preg. cows too. Actually I did buy some type of wormer (Golden BlendGoat Dewormer Pellets) from Hoegger goat supply. They said it was okay for cows, but in a larger amount. I haven't used it yet as fecals haven't shown a need to. Maybe before you follow through with a wormer have a fecal done at a vet.

    The only caution I would have about hay (and check with others) is I remember being told to use grass hay the last month or month and a half. Stay away from alfalfa, as it can be problematic for milk fever.

    If someone else on this board tells you something different, go with what they say as I'm still way too new at this and usually only have information based on what I've read on the board earlier.

    Good luck with the calf.... keep us posted when it comes.
     
  5. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi JR,
    I drench all my stock - sheep, cattle and pigs - two to four weeks before they are due to start birthing. To the best of my knowledge there is no drench that will have a detrimental affect on the foetus. I can't recommend a drench as although the ones we use here are the same as what you can obtain, they often come under different trade names so it just becomes confusing. However Ivomec is universal and very good so that could be a good place to start.
    I can't comment on the alfalfa hay as we have very little of it over here but under the circumstances I should think grass hay would be the better way to go anyway.

    Christine, some drenches have a milk withholding period which mainly means that if you a milking commercially, the milk should not go into the vat for collection. However, there are now some very good drenches on the market with a nil withholding period so shop around and see what you come up with.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  6. myersfarm

    myersfarm Dariy Calf Raiser

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    if you will give her hay.....just reg old hay not any thing with high protien it will help with the ,,,runs as i call it in cows.....also as a wormer cydectin can be used anytime and also no milk withdraw john