holestine cows

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by arnoldw, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. arnoldw

    arnoldw Well-Known Member

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    I spent last friday at Siler City NC livestock Auction. Around 30 Holestein Cows went through between 1000lbs and 1700lbs. absolutely beutiful animals. None of them where breed and all of them where dry. Im quessing they didnt catch and was sold instead off holding off till next year. If my assumption is correct what is the chance off breeding them this summer and actually getting them to calve and produce milk again. Does this seem reasonable or am I missing something. Oh they went for 40 to 50 cent per lb. All of the holestins where in very good condition to the point most where fat.
    Thanks Arnold
     
  2. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There is usually a reason a cow is culled for not settling. They are usually bred at least four times and if they don't take and their production drops tehy are no longer earning their way.
    However, that is not always the case. Strange they were dry because a cow is generally kept in milk until seven months into her gestation.
    The school has a cow they dried up who wasn't pregnant and on occassion a cow will abort.

    Sometimes in larger herds where the animals are not seen all day they are not caught at the right time for AI. If the animal is run with a viable bull and still does not settle then that usually indicates a produce reproductively.

    You take a big risk if you buy a dry, open cow. However, she has settled before if she is dry, so her reproductive organs were in decent shape at one point.

    Fat animals have a harder time settling and have a difficult time calving as well.
    We on occassion end up with overweight three and four year old open heifers that we sell if they don't settle to the bull they are run with.
     

  3. arnoldw

    arnoldw Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the response. The holestines caught my eye because they seemed to be in such good shape. We where there buying Holestine bottle babies.
    I dont need that much milk but I could raise alot of babies off of that much milk.
    Thanks Arnold
     
  4. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You certainly could. It is up to you wether it is worth the risk. If you buy them at beef price, you could always sell them again as beef, but you will have to feed them for those first couple of months while they are AIed or run with a bull. They can be bred all year round...if they are cycling. We had some animals not cycle during the winter once. So you wouldn't necesarrilly have to wait to breed them.
     
  5. evermoor

    evermoor Well-Known Member

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    A word of caution on the purchases of open dry culls. In some states it is illegal to purchase this animal if they are designated for slaughter. Our first house cow was a $300 sale barn cow that our employer was getting rid of, and wouldn't sell to us. She was a great girl and we miss her dearly. However another chance came when another employer was selling a cow at the sale barn and since the new law took place I couldn't buy her unless she went directly to a certified slaughter facility. Here in Iowa, and probabbly everywhere, some people buy these cows run them with a bull and resale them or take someones mastitic, diseased cows they bought at pound price haul her to a sale for dairy and make a quick buck. Evidentily a farmer noticed his cull cow at another sale 3 days later by a questionable cattle jockey. So yeah these cows can have a calf although it generally isn't a good idea unless you know some previous history. You could go to about any dairy and buy a hard breeder that is almost on the way out for the same money and you might find more out about the personal& repro history. But hey if ya got a bull, extra grass, and want to take the risk I'd guess 20 of those slick holstein would get pregnant in a year with a little help. Or play the lottery.
     
  6. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't cows going for slaughter have to have a paper with them? We have papers with slaughter orders on them for animals we ship that are Johne's positive or ones we are suspect of so there isn't a chance of them going to another herd. Moulan was a gorgeous milk cow but had a slaughter order with her because of Johne's.
     
  7. arnoldw

    arnoldw Well-Known Member

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    Alot of time cattle going through these sales to not have a slaughter attached because of being breed and others do. Generly the ones that do are ignored if bought by indivuals instead of meat buyers. The same thing with hogs. Ive bought boar hogs at the sale, breed our sows and taken him back to the same sale where he went for suasage. I dont want a holstein to drink the milk but to feed bottle babies with. I would have to have them tested for TB and Johnes.
    Is there anything else I should be looking for that may be obvious that I can see at the sale.
    Thanks All Arnold
     
  8. beeman97

    beeman97 Well-Known Member

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    Arnold,
    I work at the Oxford livestock auction here in nc & i can give you a hint or 2 about what to watch for when going to these auctions. 1st is ,,, the major buyers of these sales know more about the animals ging through then they let on. most everyone around these sales has been there for ever & they know everyone bringing cattle in. so the 1 good thing to watch is how the regulars react to any given cow walking through. after you figure out who is buying for slaughter & who is buying for personal use the task of knowing the animals gets alittle easier.
    the slaughter buyer will only pay so much for his aminals & will not go over that price as it is dictated by the market value of that given week.
    if the animal going through is a good cow then others will be bidding on her as well & it will soon go over the slaughter buyers pricing scheme.
    those will be the animals you want to look at.
    of course this all takes considerable time to figure out & even then you have to be right on top of it when a good cow comes into the ring.
    For the most part though ,,, most all dairy cows going into the auctions are there for reasons which are sound. the dairy producers do not make enough money to treat there animals in a careless manner & most do not end up at hte auction without considerable thought & alot of attempts to breed.
    good luck
    Rick
     
  9. arnoldw

    arnoldw Well-Known Member

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    Hi Rick Im not sure where you are in NC. I hope the snow and cold weather past you. Im the Southeast Coast of NC We did not get any of the snow but we had really cold days and Nights. Your right about watching who's buying what. There is a livestock Auction in Chadburn NC on Mondays and when I can I go. Ive been there to know who's buying for what reason. There are certain set of feed lot buyers for cattle and lately there price seems to continue to go up. I only make it to Siler City about once every couple months for bottle calves. There no dairies in this area on the coast.
    Rick I understand dairies are based on profits. Id like to find one that no longer able to produce 80lbs. of Milk a day and sold for production or couldnt AI. Run a bull in with Her and let her Stay and see if she will come in heat and breed. There was some absolutely well taken care of dairy cows. There where also some real then ones. There was buyer there buying 800 to 1000lbs. freemartins Holsteins. I was so noicey I asked the buyer. He told me that a man raises them to that weight and he has a Texas buyer that finish fattens them on Wheat fields. I would really apreciate yout opionon. Thanks Arnold
     
  10. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Amazing the difference in prices from one area to another. An animal at that age here would bring about a dollar a lb. Day old 80lb heifer calves are going for 500-600 dollars here. Some are going for 2000 here for 6-9 month olds up this way. Some of these farms here are selling bred cows for $2500-$3000. Perhaps those were low because they didn't breed back, but geeeze up this way its luck to find something priced like that.


    Jeff
     
  11. arnoldw

    arnoldw Well-Known Member

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    I think that they went at those prices because they didnt catch. Jeff what are dairy bull calves bringing there. There running between 40 and 70 a peice for day old to week old Holstein calves. We where looking at those holsteins for nurse cows. Thanks Arnold
     
  12. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Haven't checked on dairy bull calves lately, I forgot what this one farm is selling their Holstein bull calf for. Another lady had a Jersey bull calf, and im not sure what he was priced at. We did buy a Jersey bull calf 2 years ago this coming April for $5.00 :). If I find out the bull calf prices here, ill let ya know.


    Jeff