hogs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by jinx, Dec 16, 2004.

  1. jinx

    jinx Guest

    I have a friend that has two sows and one of them just had a litter of 3, he said that the momma ate two of them. is this common?
     
  2. Mulefoot

    Mulefoot Active Member

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    Unfortunately it is fairly common. It especially happens when a sow gets nervous. Like if it is her first litter, if she was recently moved into new surroundings, she doesn't like where she is farrowing at, or is just a high strung animal. There is a tendency to find it more often in confinement farrowing situations with some of the modern commercial hogs.
     

  3. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    As Kev says, it is a fairly common occurance but thankfully not one that I have personally had to deal with which makes me think that much of it could be stress related. My sows a fairly laid back, get moved to their farrowing quarters a good week before they are due so that they have time to arrange things to suit themselves, given plenty of straw to do their arrangeing with, and are well fed and watered. Until farrowing they have access to a good sized yard for grazing and slothing around in. If possible I'm with them at farrowing. The end result is happy sows and healthy piglets.

    The other thing I have wondered about in the piglet eating scenario is a lack of protein (or something) in the sow but can't find any research on this. Any thoughts on this Kev?

    3 piglets is a very small litter. Was this sow very young?

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  4. jinx

    jinx New Member

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    Yes, young wild hogs, just moved them to a 25x25 pen 3 weeks ago, trapped them off our deer lease in South Arkansas. One of our members decided he wanted to raise some of them so he took them home. 2 sows and 1 bore.
     
  5. Mulefoot

    Mulefoot Active Member

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    Unfortunately, I've had to deal with this problem a couple of times with first litter gilts. I hadn't let them get used to their new farrowing accomodations long enough. But that was back when I had a 75 sows farrow to finish and did a lot of farrowing in crates.

    Now I only have five sows I don't use crates and the sows are a heritage breed which seems to be much less high strung than the commercial hogs I had before.

    I don't think that a protein problem is to blame. I believe it is stress related. If all three of the hogs are together then that could contribute to it since sows like to be somewhat isolated when they farrow.

    What color are the wild hogs that were trapped? Are they of the feral, spanish, or european boar type?
     
  6. jinx

    jinx New Member

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    they are feral hogs and they are multicolored, So he should build another pen for the sows?
     
  7. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    I have heard of this but never seen it. From what I've read I think it is stress related but some people say it may be temperment and genetic. I doubt it is a lack of protein. We raise our sows on pasture which is where they get almost all of their feed in the winter and never experience it. They are pretty low stress ladies and get a fair amount of interaction with us and with the dogs who guard and herd them.

    Did they have sufficient space? Did they have good bedding? We provide hay but the sows sometimes choose their own nests in the brush and make them from grass and saplings. Were they stressed by anything you can think of? How was the weather - excessively cold or hot?

    A second concern is the size of the litter. Three is a very small litter for meat production pigs, not sure for his. How old were they when bred? Were they in good condition? Did they have about an inch of back fat? More? Less? I have heard from the farmer that lends us his boars that if they are too fat or too young they'll have fewer piglets and not nurse as well. Poor condition (skinny) would also do that sort of thing as they wouldn't have the resources to devote to the pregnancy and milk.

    Cheers,

    -Walter
    Sugar Mtn Farm
    in Vermont