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i was going to address this to uncle will, but then i thought, i really would like to hear from everyone.
i put hog rings in my daughter's weiner pigs nose, maybe at least three, but about a month or two later, one or two are gone and they are tearing up everything. i think i am putting them in right. what exactly is right, or do you expect to lose some? this is about the fifth batch i have done and they are now having a rootin good time. they are not all gone, just lose most of them. thanks
 

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This is how we do it. The plier like ringers have a set screw on the handle to ajust for various size rings. pig rings come in at least two sizes. We used the small size for weaner pigs. Before starting, take a ring and squeeze it shut, and set the set screw to fit the ring when it is closed with the points lapped against each other. Grip the pigs snout in your left hand and put the ring just off center of the nose divider. Put the top point behind the little rooter on top the nose, and put the bottom point down low enough that the rooter will be against the center bend in the ring when the ring is clamped shut. A ring on each side about an inch apart should last the pig for 2 or three months before they tear out. Then you get stronger help, and use the larger rings. Pigs over 200 lb usually got sow rings that go in the center of the nose. Sometimes the sow ring needed to be accompanyed by a couple shoat rings on top the rooter. Avoid putting rings right in the center of the rooter, as the ring will hit the bone in the middle of the nose. I am guessing you may not be putting them in deep enough. Also the points must close far enough for the beveled part behind them to match up.
 

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uncle Will in In. said:
This is how we do it. The plier like ringers have a set screw on the handle to ajust for various size rings. pig rings come in at least two sizes. We used the small size for weaner pigs. Before starting, take a ring and squeeze it shut, and set the set screw to fit the ring when it is closed with the points lapped against each other. Grip the pigs snout in your left hand and put the ring just off center of the nose divider. Put the top point behind the little rooter on top the nose, and put the bottom point down low enough that the rooter will be against the center bend in the ring when the ring is clamped shut. A ring on each side about an inch apart should last the pig for 2 or three months before they tear out. Then you get stronger help, and use the larger rings. Pigs over 200 lb usually got sow rings that go in the center of the nose. Sometimes the sow ring needed to be accompanyed by a couple shoat rings on top the rooter. Avoid putting rings right in the center of the rooter, as the ring will hit the bone in the middle of the nose. I am guessing you may not be putting them in deep enough. Also the points must close far enough for the beveled part behind them to match up.
i will print this off and check my ringing actions.
kate
 

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I was told that if you give them minerals in their feed, it keeps them from rooting. Is this hogwash? :D

Obviously if there are roots to eat, it won't keep them from eating, but I thought it cut down on excessive rooting.
 
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Those rings must work purty good. I see a lot teen kids wearing them now days. I never thought of ringing my own kids. :D
 
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:haha: Yep, some of us might be better off if we had been neutered long time ago!
 

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And now for a dissenting opinion... :)

When I was a kid we never used hog rings. I decided not to in part because I just didn't like the idea and in part because I realized that one of the very valuable functions a pig can serve is tilling the soil. They till up our gardens in the fall after we're done with them and then again in the spring before we plant. This gets rid of a lot of grubs, weeds, etc so gardening is very easy.

I've also had the pigs till up sections of field and then planted crops behind them. When they have a lot of space they don't dig nearly as much except initially in the spring when they're so excited to be out on pasture again and then just before birthing when they're probably looking for extra minerals. The pasture always heals quickly afterwards and is no worse for the wear. If anything it is better than before. Hog nose rings would interfer with this useful function.

As to using hog rings to control them like people do with bulls, perhaps it might work. I haven't tried it. When I want a pig to go somewhere I find the best thing to do is call it ("Heeeerrreeee Pig-pig-pig!!!) and show it that I have a treat - grain, bread, garden gleanings, a bunch of grass I just pulled up, anything. :) Once they get big that is definitely the best way to move them.

Start training them young to come to the sound of your voice and the sound of a bucket being rattled. Our dogs are also very helpful at herding and the pigs obey them since they've been doing it from the time they were snack size.

-Walter
 

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kate said:
i will print this off and check my ringing actions.
kate
Hi I just logged on. I am doing some research (Biblical acutally) and I was wondering if someone could tell me what a snout ring is used for and why? Does it control behavior? I would appreciate any correct response.
Thanks.
VERY CLUELESS!
 

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CLUELESS said:
I was wondering if someone could tell me what a snout ring is used for and why? I would appreciate any correct response.
Hog rings are used to make proper electrical contact between the pigs and the ground so that geoporcine electricity can be generated on the farm to power the windmills and keep those blades moving so the air flows past and the farms get new weather on a daily basis - don't want to get stuck in the doldrums!

Oh, that's right, you said a correct response. :) Let me try again...

Hog rings are meant to keep the pigs from rooting in the soil and tearing up the sod in the pasture.

They work, but I don't feel they're necessary. The pigs don't really tear up the sod that much except in the spring and then it smooths out again. They only dig down about 3" and what that does is airate the soil which is good for the pasture. We don't use hog rings because I want them to root.

Another reason NOT to use hog rings in a boar is that he uses his nose on the sow's vulva prior to mating and if he has a hog ring in it can tear up the lady's private parts - not good.

Frankly, I liked my first explination...

Cheers,

-Walter
in Vermont
 
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