Hog Holder - Works?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Mr. Dot, May 19, 2005.

  1. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    Howdy
    When butchering time eventually comes I'll need to move a hog from the pen to where I plan to kill and butcher - a distance of about 175'. I've been pondering how I'm going to accomplish that. I've read the bucket on the head thing and having a rope around a leg thing but I have my doubts. I just ran across this gadget:

    Hog Holder

    Anyone here used one of these? Supposed to slip around the snout. Would this be practical help to get a 200 lb + hog from my point A to point B? Seems like it would.
    Thanx.
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I have one. It is a holder not a leash nor will the animal be broke to lead. It will not function for your purpose. If you will make a 6 to 8 ft. circle with woven wire and then cover the wire, sides only no top, with black roll plastic the pig will walk along inside the enclosure to wherever you want to go. If the pig is accustomed to being on concrete he may not walk on dirt until he becomes use to the dirt.
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Yep, the way those hog holders work is you try to grab them by the snout (not as easy as it sounds) and they yard back on it. It's real hard to try to lead a hog backwards any distance in the right direction. Same problem with the bucket method. Works for a short distance in a chute or confined area where the direction can be controlled but by the time you get 175 feet across an open space you are going to cover a mile on a dead run trying to keep that bucket on the hog.

    agman's got the only method that works well but my choice would be to kill in the pen and drag the critter to where you need to go.
     
  4. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I knew it sounded too good to be true.

    Killing in place would make most sense but I'll be doing in the two hogs on different weekends and I don't want to kill the one in front of the other. That just doesn't seem right.

    I like the circular mini-pen idea. I have also considered making a chute with cattle panels (or something) that would allow me to get hog number one out of sight of hog number two before doing the deed. I'll have to chew on this for a while longer but the walk-along pen is good thinking.
     
  5. elgordo

    elgordo Well-Known Member

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    Are your hogs trained to electric? What about making temporary "corridors" with electric tape or rope and leading them to where they need to go using a food treat they really love. We once led a couple using milk in a bucket. (OK - it worked with one; the other took a little more effort!) Just a thought!
     
  6. ihedrick

    ihedrick Can't stop thinkin'

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    My son and I finished a 4h project with two pigs. Loading them was easier once the butcher was done with them! To load them in the trailer we tried a series of things:

    -withheld their breakfast and hoped they would jump into the trailer to get dinner (didn't work)

    -put towel over head and push/guide them to trailer

    -put tow rope around girth and pull (definately no good!)

    -made chute from chain link fence gates (worked on one) as we shortened the shute into a triangle shape.

    -tried to tie legs and drag into trailer (legs slipped out of rope)

    -lastly, three adults jumped a 140 pound pig (I'd swear she was 340 pounds by the fight) and drug her into the trailer

    If you do the portable pen thing, I would make sure that the pig couldn't get their snout under the fencing to just toss it over their head and run off. Maybe you could make a kill box outside the gate. Move the unlucky one into that temp box and do the deed. That way it'd be out of sight ofthe other one (even though I think it will know anyway) and you don't run the risk of it getting away from you. It would be much easier to handle as dead weight other than live on the hoof weight. Wish I could show you all the bruises I got from this ordeal, but hey, atleast I know first hand what works and doesn't work, and what I will do next time!
     
  7. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Taming your pigs from day one is the best way to keep them calm at butchering time. A calm pig dies peacefully and the meat tastes better. Pigs are very easily trained to follow their keeper anywhere, just grab a bucket with feed and you'll see :) Rather than rely on any method that I personally am not familiar with and that might backfire on the day I most need it to work smoothly, I would make friends with my pigs from day one. Treating them kindly, earning their trust by making myself reliable, getting them used to a routine they follow without hesitation, will allow me to lead them to a peaceful end. That is my goal.
    I've tried several methods that are enforced at times I've picked pigs up- the bucket over the head is laughable for anything over 60 pounds so I can't imagine it doing anything but making all involved very stressed when the pig is near market weight. This animal is about to die for you. I can't understand anyone not treating that situation with the utmost respect and that is done by working with them from day one to make it an easy transition.
     
  8. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    you can move the hog with hurdles. Made of 3/4 in. plywood, Easy to carry. If you are tall, you can make bigger one's if short, shorter ones...I like about a 3x4. Cut a hole in the top for a hand hold. The calmness of the pig at killing is right on. If the pig can see through it, he will be likely to try and go through it. That is why I like hurdles. Our pigs start learning to load the trailer in May, by mid June, you can tell them, "load up" and they load up. They are the smartest animals alive. My kids will train theirs starting now for the summer shows. Aside from a couple who are very stubborn, they end up with huge improvements after about 1 week. It will take more than one hurdle at first. Three to train is good. One on each side and one in the back.