Hog Fence

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Kimon, Jun 7, 2005.

  1. Kimon

    Kimon Not a Cannibal

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    What in your opinion is the best way to fence an area about ten acres. I want to protect my animals, keep them from wandering and also keep out some unwanted critters. I am thinking about Hog fencing three sides of my property and cross fencing the front for looks with hog wire behind to keep my dogs from roaming.

    Pro's and cons?
    How about electric wire?
    What about invisible fence for the dogs? We have a couple who are roamers.
     
  2. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Field fencing is good because it increases your options as to what animals you can have. A 6 strand barbedwire fence is good for cattle but won't contain goats, sheep or hogs. It won't even slow a coyote down. i've seen them go through or under a woven wire fence at full speed. Make sure you have barbed wire on the bottom and some on top(depending on Hieght of woven wire) anywhere from two to 4 strands.

    Remember, a good fence is horse high, pig tight, and bull strong.
    Ed
     

  3. Snakeoil

    Snakeoil Well-Known Member

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    Hog fencing will be very expensive.
     
  4. Kimon

    Kimon Not a Cannibal

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    Expense is relative, what is real expensive?
     
  5. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    6 or 7 wire electrified hi-tensile. low cost, quick and easy install. With 5-6 inch hot wire on the bottom, not much will be coming in or out. But, you have to keep it trimmed and train the animals inside.
     
  6. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I couldn't afford to fence off my entire property but fenced in about 1/3. I used 4" goat fencing and it's super strong. The wire is wrapped and not welded so that can not just lean on it and pop the wires.
     
  7. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    Fencing will not hold roaming dogs; they will just dig under it.
     
  8. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Whatever you do, make it high enough for everything it will ever need to control. Barbed wire topline is good, IF YOU AREN'T EVER GOING TO HAVE HORSES. If a horse runs into or half-jumps a barbed fence, they can end up struggling and do some terrible damage to their pretty skins. High-visibility electric top-wire is good. If you want dogs to respect the fence you can have electric bottom wire as well, maybe on outriggers. However, as someone said you'll have to keep it mowed or sprayed, otherwise anything down to a dewy morning will short out the fence.

    You can often pick up used wire netting from fences that have been torn down - particularly if you're having your fence built professionally. If you can pin that flat on the ground underneath your fence it can stop animals digging under the fence. Mind it does have to be fastened down, or it can end up snaring animals.
     
  9. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Would that hold goats? Our land is very hilly, it's on a slope. I've tried starting with field fence and it's so difficult to get it straight and tight, going up and down each little bank. I'm trying to convince my wife into just trying the high tensile wires. I think that even spacing the wires every 3 inches has got to be easier and cheaper in the long run....but again, "expensive" is relative. It won't save any time or money if it won't hold her goats in.
     
  10. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    I'm putting that in for our goats and poultry. 6 wire is designed for goats, sheep, pigs and predator control. First 5-6 inches off the ground, the next spaced at 6, 6, 8, 10 and 12. 1,2,4,6 are hot. The nice thing with HT is you can pop in the green t-posts where ever the terrain jigs to keep the wires spaced right. The 5-6 inches on the bottom gives you some wiggle room to let it drop to 3-4. Electric is a psychological barrier more than a physical one, so make sure the animals learn quickly to respect it. Fewer big posts (every 40-60 feet because you want some play in it), thinner wire, no goats leaning on it or trying to climb it. When you train the animals to know the shock is there, they avoid going near the fence. Good for predator control as well - the hot bottom wire makes it difficult to dig under it. Make sure you have good grounding, a big enough charger and a good weedwhacker to keep the vegetation down below the bottom wire.
     
  11. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My land is all hills and hollows. The fence that has proven the best for me is 5 strands. Top, middle, and bottom high tensile wire hooked to a "knock you on your butt" ac charger, the second and fourth wires are the ground wires and are gaucho barbed wire, all five have strainer reels and springs. The key to any fence is strong, straight well braced corners. I used steel galvanized T posts with a treated wood line post at the top and bottom of every rise and dip in the ground or wherever needed. This fence has held cattle, horses, donkeys, sheep, hogs and goats for over fifteen years with no problem. Everything soon learns to respect the hot wires, and the barb deters anything from crawling through if the electricity should be off.
     
  12. crashy

    crashy chickaholic goddess

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    We have a little over an acre and bought horse fencing from Home Depot. It worked pretty good but our big dogs would hit the fence 100mph and we were afraid that eventually they would go over somehow. So we also put up a 7' ft wooden fence behind the wire well now nothing gets in or gets out...we call our place The Coffman Compound...LOL
    As for the electric fencing you have to weed all the time.
     
  13. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Hog fence or hog panels are about $12 - $20 per panel for a 16' panel. This is just the panel and you will need posts.
     
  14. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

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    We ended up using 10 1/2 gauge 4' high field fence with white electric tape at the top for visibility (horses in the future) and a hot wire 6" from the ground on the outside of the fence for predator control. We used 4" wooden posts buried 3' deep every 50 feet with 8" posts buried 4' deep at corners and ends (like gate openings) with T posts every 10' between.

    Figured that was good for just about anything except maybe goats which are the Houdinis of the farm animal kingdom.

    ~Berta

    Edited to add: Materials cost about $1k to fence 2.5 acres in the described manner but we did have some posts and fence left over...I always overestimate to avoid shortfalls and the leftovers always seem to get used for something.
     
  15. Kimon

    Kimon Not a Cannibal

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    Perfect thanks that is exactly what I am looking for!