Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
988 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We have one hive that had snow that got up in front of the opening, I guess, and it did not make it through the winter. It ended up mildewing - the feathery type. What do I need to do? It is full of honey and dead bees. I have noticed some bees from our other hive scooting in there. Or at least I am assuming that is where they can from. If I scrape it and extract the honey will that work and not make us sick? Thanks - Glad to see this up and running!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Honey has a shelf life of about 10 years, but I don’t know if scraping the mold off is going to be good enough. Some of it may still get into the honey. Honey is antibacterial but I do not think you should test it to see how well it works. You could put the honey in the existing hive and the bees will clean it much better than you can. The only draw back is they may eat all the honey…faster than you know. Another point to remember, if your hive died of some bee disease then you could spread it to your other hive.

You should get enough honey from your other hive to carry you through the year. I would save the honey/wax comb from the dead out and do a split with the existing hive or you can keep it and feed it back to the existing hive in the fall.

BB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
vtfarma said:
We have one hive that had snow that got up in front of the opening, I guess, and it did not make it through the winter. It ended up mildewing - the feathery type. What do I need to do?

Your bees died because they were unable to get the moisture out of thier hive. Even here in Iowa where it gets -40 degrees, bees need ventilation, so always make sure there is a way for air to get in and out of the hive. If snow piled up in front of the hive and blocked the entrance, air could not get in or out.

It is full of honey and dead bees. I have noticed some bees from our other hive scooting in there. Or at least I am assuming that is where they can from. If I scrape it and extract the honey will that work and not make us sick? Thanks - Glad to see this up and running!
If the honey is capped, it should be fine. Honey has been found in the tombs in Egypt that was still usable, so it has about a 10,000 year shelf life. If it was not capped, it may be spoiled.

Hope this helps!

Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Here's a thought.

Are any of your other hives strong enough to be split? perhaps you could order a new queen, then split the hive putting some of the brood frames and bees and the new queen in the dead hive. The bees do a super job of cleaning hives. I'm sure they could take care of cleaning the hive and would be glad to have the frames that have already been drawn and the capped honey for food.

peace,
Jason
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Egyptians were very advanced in their preserving abilities. I read somewhere (or my tour guide told me) that they found grain in a Egyptian tomb and they were able to get some of it to sprout!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,697 Posts
:bouncy: The USDA also approves GMO grain along with some other farm pratices:goodjob:

:D Al
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top