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I know prices vary, and I see the prices per pound, but I'm still a little confused. I found a highland heifer calf, newborn, and can buy it in 2 or 3 months when it's ready to be away from her mom. They are asking 400.00. It's from really healthy stock and a nice clean farm. I know some folks here think highlands are a funny breed for dairy, but I'm looking for a highland heifer to turn into our dairy cow. Anyhoo, does that sound like a fair price? We're in Maine.
 

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If it is purebred stock, the 400.00 dollar price tag would be appropriate, I would think. Otherwise, seems steep to me. A more traditional dairy heifer calf could be purchased for that amount.......then you would most assuredly have a consistent mild producer. I would also wonder about the ease of milking a cow with such long hair......would think that would hamper the milking....I know it would present issues with trying to milk our belted galloways......during the winter months, the hair coat is very thick and hangs down and is thick around the udder.
 

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i think it is a descent price, not sure how many highlanders are in Maine.
If you like the farm and the stock, then that is a plus. If they can be handling her before hand that is even better, like halter training ect..
See if you can wait atleast till 3 months till weaning before you take her away from momma, they grow slow and need milk atleast that long, or we prefer that they do.

But as far as a milk cow, they don't produce much as the milk breeds and there will be little extra after feeding the calf for a few months. Just something to think about.
 

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I'm training my Highland heifer for milking. The hair on and around the udder isn't really a problem. Just wash the udder like any other beast, you may occasionally have to trim some hair, but I just can't see it being a problem. They don't produce as much as a dairy breed, but it is 8 to 10 percent butterfat.
As for prices, here $400 is the going rate for a weaned steer or unregistered heifer. Registered the price jumps to $1000 and up. The last heifer I sold went for $1450.
 
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