high tinsile smooth wire fencing help

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by oldmanriva, Sep 27, 2004.

  1. oldmanriva

    oldmanriva Guest

    anyone have it and istalled it your self? Thinking of giving it a try on about 7 acres. How does cost compare to woven wire? Any advise before I start? How many stands to hold cows and /or goats? Thank you
     
  2. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I'm very interested, too. Tractor Supply recommended it to me yesterday for goats. How many strands would we need? What would be the spacing? Which strands should be electrified? How far should the posts be spaced? Would Sam, our beloved Great Pyrenees, be able to walk right through this? If we topped it with the white, electric tape to make it more visible, would we be able to use it for emus or donkeys?

    The guy at TC said that one electric line on a standoff on the inside of the posts about 12 inches off the ground would keep the goats away from the high tensile. Does this sound right? My 3 year old was really bored and I couldn't stay much longer to ask more questions.
     

  3. dla

    dla Well-Known Member

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    My daughter spent three months nursing a horse which sliced its leg on high-tensile wire at another farm.
    Boo to high-tensile for horses.
    We like electrobraid.
     
  4. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ...............The best value in fencing for Both Goats\Dogs is to install "field fencing" . 47 inches high , with 2 strands of either barbed wire or smooth wire , spaced 6 inches apart to effectively give you a five foot fence . The problem with goats is that they are always getting their horns caught in the wire . The SMALLER the squares the Better . Space T-posts about 10 to 12 feet apart . Build your corners and Hbraces with 3 inch pipe for the verticals and use 2 1\2 inch for your horizontials . Weldup all corners and h's and set them 3 feet deep in a 9 inch diameter hole . A 9 inch diameter hole that is 30 to 36 inches deep will take 2-80 lb. sacks of sackcrete . The best way to keep the goats out and OFF the fence is to install some 6 inch plastic standoff's about 30 inches high with a HOTwire and they and the DOG will leave the fence ALONE!...fordy... :eek: :)
     
  5. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Can you teach me to weld over the internet?
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    You can glean some info here http://fence-electric.com/Locations.php For cattle and goats the fence works fine if properly constructed. I have personally installed approximately 100,000 feet of the wire on my farm where I have beef cattle. Good corners, good insulators and a very good fence charger are key items in having a good fence.
     
  7. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ................The Best and Cheapest way to learn to weld with a "stick" welder is to procure a AC\DC 0-225 amp , Cracker box unit , from either Miller or Lincoln . Set it up in a place where it is safe for "lots of Sparks" to go flying (No, not like the Drivein :p ) and start just practicing , i.e. playing . You should also get established with your local steel\welder supplier and setup an account and Rent a set of O2\Acetylene bottles for a Cutting torch and Start getting use to Using it as well . Don't get in a hurry!! Also , contact your local community college and see if they have any classes for beginners . It, really is alot of fun once you get the "Feel" as May West use to say . ...fordy.... :eek: :)
     
  8. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It so much depends on what you are trying to do, and the land you are trying to do it on.

    for fencing several 100 acres of pasture, high-tensile can't be beat, posts can be 50' apart, 3 wires might be enough....

    To fence a small pen where critters are going to be crowded into & held over winter & such, you might need 7-9 wires, posts every 8 feet, and a lot more expense.

    It's easier to do on gentle slopes than through gullies & hills.

    It's cheaper to do for pasture situations where you are trying to just influence the livestock. Long runs of fairly level wire are so cheap to do....

    in a yard situation where you need to control the livestock, you need more wire & posts so the price is close to the same.

    Lots of corners or steep up/down areas will cost you more than just using woven. High-tensile has cheap wire, but very expensive corners & tensioning parts.

    It is a different system, and works real well in large open areas. Costs mount up in small areas where better control is needed.

    I've heard negatives for horses as someone mentioned here - if you have a kicker or a spooky horse. Most other livestock does well with it, depending on wire spacing & a real good charger.

    Why use expensive white tape, run an electrified wire?

    --->Paul
     
  9. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Mainly for visiblity for the emus. I've been told that they have a hard time even seeing woven wire and that you should top a woven wire fence with a painted board.
     
  10. Valmai

    Valmai Well-Known Member

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    Hi there I'm new to this forum.
    Might I suggest you go for the 'good old Number 8 wire' . High tensile wire is VERY hard to tie off. Dont know anything about fencing in goats, but for cattle you could use posts and 3 wires, making the top and bottom hot. The distance between the posts depends on soil type and topograghy (ask around). An even cheaper option (dependant once again on soil etc.) would be posts and strainers at ends and corners with insulated waratahs in between.
    Woven (sheep netting) is not a particularly good idea with cows and probably not so good for goats either. It is also harder to 'get right'.
     
  11. designer

    designer Well-Known Member

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    Most of our fencing is high tensile. DH and his Dad and brother did all of it. They use 6x6 post for corners, braced, and metal T post between with insulators. 3 strands electric for the cows and for horses. They tie plastic serveyer's tape, about 1in wide in spots on the top strand to make it more visible to the animals. And put a racket thing on one of the corner post on each strand. This is so you can tighten it and re tighten later on if it starts to sag. They do a high class job. They take their fenching very seriously. LOL
    We only have a few pygmy goats and they are in woven wire with a set out hot wire at the top and bottom.
     
  12. oldmanriver

    oldmanriver Well-Known Member

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    ok i need a fence for goats and cattle Have 7 acres to do now but will end up doing 80 or more acres Will the high tensile smooth wire with top and bottom stands electic work?? Any estamate on cost per foot?
     
  13. designer

    designer Well-Known Member

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    My hubby just added his opinion, he says 4 strands high tensile smooth wire all electric with a strong electric box will work for both. But he doesn't know how much per foot it cost.
     
  14. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We are doing kennels for raising dogs. Where is the best place to purchase materials? We had planned to buy ready made dog kennels from American Fence in Tucson but the price is so high. DH wants to make his own. Any ideas?
     
  15. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ......................................My suggestion , here in Texas , we can buy galvinized heavy gauge panels ranging from 10 feet long up to 24 feet long , 4 feet , 5 feet , and 6 feet high . The spacing comes in 3 configuration(s)...2 x 4 inch just no climb fence wire , 4 x 4 inch squares also in 4,5,6 feet high and at tractor supply they sell a "Combo" panel which is the same spacing as Field fence and they are 16 and 20 feet long . You have to attach these panel(s) to some kind of a rigid framework , i.e. say 2 inch diameter by 14 gauge pipe would work nicely . If , You can Weld , they go up real fast using 6011 rod . I would pour a small concete beam of say 4 by 6 inches and cement the bottom of the panels for security purposes and you can cement your posts in their holes at the same time . And it wouldn't be that expensive if you do the Labor yourselves . The galvinized panels can be welded as long as you're outside with plenty of airflow, ...fordy..... :eek: :)
     
  16. sidepasser

    sidepasser Well-Known Member

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    I use high tensile fence as cross fencing for my pastures and have never had a horse get hurt on it. we use five strands and only make the bottom, middle and top strand "hot". We use metal t posts or wooden posts with insulators and use cross bracing at the corners and ceramic insulators on all the wooden posts. Sometimes we use the black tubing type insulators as well. Just stretch it very tightly using a ratchet at each end of the fence. It keeps the horses in and we tie a piece of cotton sheeting to each strand every 20 feet on all strands to make sure the horses can see it.

    Never had a problem with any of the horses running into it. We use wood fencing and cattle panels on all the perimeter fences, namely because the deer keep tearing the fences down.

    Sidepasser
     
  17. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I've heard of these "elusive" panels but cannot find any information on them. I'm in need of some rigid, heavy gauge, galvanized fence panels (like cattle panels or hog panels that the tractor supply sells) that have 2 X 4 inch openings and are at least 6 feet high. I've heard that they are available 8 feet high and 20 feet long. I really would like at least 4, preferably 6 of these. Maybe more. Where would I look? I've tried searching Google, but can't find anything. What words would I use to search for them? How much would they cost? I need them to make some outdoor cages for some exotics.