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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I'm 23 years old, and I've lived in a fairly large city in Canada for 11 years. I know that urban homesteading is a thing, but I would love to get away from the city to move somewhere quieter and more green, closer to nature, where there's fresher air just to name one benefit. I'd like to live either on a farm or in a cabin in the woods.

I've never done any homesteading or construction, and you could say I'm completely at ground zero in achieving my dream of moving somewhere rural. I've considered the idea of doing a farm stay via a website life wwoof or helpx.net to get a feel for the lifestyle. Hopefully I can go out of my comfort zone to try it. Given that my family isn't interested in a rural lifestyle, nor do I have any such friends, all of this would be brand new to me.

There seem to be many options for where to start a farm, and I'd be willing to move to the US if such a thing were possible with immigration laws.

I have this vague dream but have absolutely no idea what I'm doing or how to get started. I guess I'd have to start by saving up a lot of money to buy land and pay building costs, but that seems like it could take many years. It would be cool to maybe meet a buddy or two, maybe someone who's also at "ground zero". So yeah, hello everyone.
 

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Hello everyone. I'm 23 years old, and I've lived in a fairly large city in Canada for 11 years. I know that urban homesteading is a thing, but I would love to get away from the city to move somewhere quieter and more green, closer to nature, where there's fresher air just to name one benefit. I'd like to live either on a farm or in a cabin in the woods.

I've never done any homesteading or construction, and you could say I'm completely at ground zero in achieving my dream of moving somewhere rural. I've considered the idea of doing a farm stay via a website life wwoof or helpx.net to get a feel for the lifestyle. Hopefully I can go out of my comfort zone to try it. Given that my family isn't interested in a rural lifestyle, nor do I have any such friends, all of this would be brand new to me.

There seem to be many options for where to start a farm, and I'd be willing to move to the US if such a thing were possible with immigration laws.

I have this vague dream but have absolutely no idea what I'm doing or how to get started. I guess I'd have to start by saving up a lot of money to buy land and pay building costs, but that seems like it could take many years. It would be cool to maybe meet a buddy or two, maybe someone who's also at "ground zero". So yeah, hello everyone.
Welcome from purdon, Texas I think the best place to move to learn about livestock and building would be Texas you will find many people here that are sweet and willing to help you
 

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Welcome!...A lot of us started out just like you....Start by learning to garden right where you are now in your backyard or a community garden location. Maybe get into raising chickens or rabbits to get a feeling for the unending daily responsibility of such to see if you can put up with it.

The biggest problem in moving to fulfill your dreams will be to have a continuing source of reliable income-- Even well established, large operation farmers need a "town job" to keep afloat-- very few are really "full time" famers...Old joke about the farmer who won the multi million dollar lottery-- "I'll keep farming until the money runs out."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome from purdon, Texas I think the best place to move to learn about livestock and building would be Texas you will find many people here that are sweet and willing to help you
Hi, thank you! Texas is a location I've considered, because I have heard before that people there can be quite sweet and hospitable. :) I want to visit at the very least. Plus, it's a large state that seems like it might have a lot of land for farming. What's Purdon like?
 

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Hi, thank you! Texas is a location I've considered, because I have heard before that people there can be quite sweet and hospitable. :) I want to visit at the very least. Plus, it's a large state that seems like it might have a lot of land for farming. What's Purdon like?
Purdon is more of a rural area but there’s still people there . There is many farmers there and pretty much anywhere you go you will see cattle, goats , chickens , horses a lot of people out here know everybody and the area doesn’t have lots of problems me and my dad last ranch home got burned down and shot all our animals dead including the horses , cattle , goats , dogs , chickens etc . That’s the only bad thing that happened in purdon but we have now made a new home and bought lots of cattle , goats , chickens , sheep , dogs etc I hope you are able to take a trip out here if you go down to purdon I think you will enjoy the wildlife
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome!...A lot of us started out just like you....Start by learning to garden right where you are now in your backyard or a community garden location. Maybe get into raising chickens or rabbits to get a feeling for the unending daily responsibility of such to see if you can put up with it.

The biggest problem in moving to fulfill your dreams will be to have a continuing source of reliable income-- Even well established, large operation farmers need a "town job" to keep afloat-- very few are really "full time" famers...Old joke about the farmer who won the multi million dollar lottery-- "I'll keep farming until the money runs out."
Thanks! I'd have to find a community garden as I live in an apartment. Trying to raise chickens/rabbits sounds like a good idea that I wish I could put into practice. Definitely need to see if I can put up with the constant work of raising animals before I ever jump the gun and move.
 

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Where we homestead there are people that moved here with no experience in anything, cleared their land and built a house from the logs and they have been here for 30+ years. I figure if they can do it back then you can do it now with the abundance of knowledge out there. We are in canada and where we are you can find fully set up off grid cabins for a good price, but there isn't much for work so keep that in mind.

Lot's of good info out there.

Check out page out if you want we post how we do the homestead life and put out content for people to learn from.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay so it seems like I should start finding work in my city first, to have money for at least a bus ticket out of the city. It may sound odd that I don't even have a small bit of money saved up, but I only started having this idea of moving very recently, and the money I DID have before, I didn't use very wisely at all. You could even say I completely wasted it. Tsk tsk.

So yeah, I'll have to work to replenish the bit of savings I once had. This is me trying to identify what the first step is. Even if I want to try helpx.net at some point, I'll need money to take a bus or rideshare across the country, so it seems I'll have to start by finding a job here in the city. The question is how long I should stay in the job before trying to make the move. I suppose in the meantime, I could also look to see if there are gardening classes in the city.

After that, the next step would be to look online for a new job, somewhere more rural. Hopefully there would be somewhere for me to live. Ideally it would be in a cabin I could rent(?) for cheap, like the person above mentioned, but I have a feeling that I'd have to start off living in a motel or apartment, and it wouldn't be a completely rural area, maybe a small city. And then would I be able to save up enough money to ditch the motel/apartment and get a cabin, or would I not have any money left after paying rent? And of course, this hinges on someone actually offering me a job in a town far away where I don't even live yet - I'm not sure if that's something that actually happens. Wouldn't they just hire someone who lives closer? Also, the other assumption is that everything goes smoothly and I don't end up getting fired at some point. Gotta be honest, right?

Thinking about all this is overwhelming. You might say "take it one step at a time", which is why I'm trying to figure out what the first step even is. Wish I'd had this dream earlier, or held onto the money I had..
 

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You are a young man , you need to figure out what you are going to do for the rest of your life
Home steading is all well and good but you need start up money for sure .
I was 6 years old and decided I was going to build stuff , so from that day on every thing I did
Worked towards being a builder .
54 years latter I’m still at it .
Most people don’t start off with a home stead we end up with one .
It hard to make money living in the woods .
at 23 you need to find a career that you love so you dont feel like you are being Tortured going to work every day .
It’s hard to just throw a dart at a map and go there .
There are a ton of things country boys just know about , my dad was in advertising so he did not know much about building trucks equipment land ?
I did have a mentor that took me in after my dad died when I was 19 years Old
you need to work toward your goal every day .
 

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I started by researching “stuff”. Anything that caught my interest I read about or watched YouTube videos, everything from a greenhouse to raising goats. I tried to think it through - what would the daily chores be like, how would I care for it, sort of a “virtual experience”. It sounds silly but I came up with a list of what I thought I’d like and what I didn’t want to do. Next we decided where to live based on the weather and what kind of recreation we enjoyed. We decided on moderation, since we don’t like snow sports and couldnt tolerate the Florida heat anymore. We are in a mountainous area that isn’t too populated So we can hike and camp.

hopefully that is helpful...
 
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