Hi, and about wringer washer

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by peacefullone, Jul 7, 2005.

  1. peacefullone

    peacefullone Member

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    Hi, I'm new here, and wondering does anyone else here only use a wringer washer to wash their clothes with? I'm really wanting to start to do this.

    Holly
     
  2. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We use a wringer washer, and have since 1977, except on occassions when we want to get lots of laundry done quickly, then go to the laundromat and use lots of washers at once.
    You need the wringer washer and 2 tubs for rinsing. In the summer, we fill the tubs and washer outside and let the water warm up if it is sunny, otherwise put some hot water in them to temper the water. In winter we set them up in the basement, and heat water on the wood stove.
    What did you need to know?

    Jim
     

  3. Mawna

    Mawna Well-Known Member

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    Nope I haven't had to use one. But I can well remember my GrandMother(s) and Aunt's using them. When I saw that you want to use one, hahaha all the sudden I could here my GrandMother's voice yell, "ARE YOU ALL NUTS!!?? YOU WANT TO USE A WRINGER WASHER?"

    It just hit me like that, you know? I can imagine how the women of that era thought they had landed in heaven with the moment they were able to obtain a Kenmore washer.

    I know.... I am right in here with the thick of you wanting life to be simpler. BUT NO, not just NO but heck NO, I don't not wish to have to use a wringer washer. Those things can eat an arm off or other unmentionables if gotten in the way.

    If I had one I would be the probadly be a tackey person and plant flowers in the darn thing. :p
     
  4. peacefullone

    peacefullone Member

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    I really would like to get one. that is hand powered either like the James Washer ( http://www.realgoods.com/shop/shop2.cfm/dv/2/dp/208/ts/1063411 ) or similar to it. Does anyone know who makes this? I read that a Mennonite family in USA makes them. I'm thinking that if I can to the source of who makes them, I could get one for cheaper.

    Holly
     
  5. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    I have used one for some time now and enjoy doing so. If you look in the paper you just might be able to pick one up for ...less than $50 !? I found mine for $20 with 2 wash tubs with it and it must be about 30 years old and runs just fine. The biggest reason I like to use them is it does save on water as you can re-use the wash and rinse water a couple of times and then water your flowers in the garden with the water. I pull mine out onto the deck during the summer to do laundry. If you say...wash towels or sheets..these don't usually get very dirty per say...then wash jeans or work clothes they will all get clean just fine. Either hook the hose from outside to fill the washer or you can haul water from in the house. I also enjoy being outside doing laundry on the nice summer days and it actually gives me time to "think" and relax a little. I also have one up outside the barn than does need an electric cord that I picked up for a few bucks that I have set up with 2 huge laundry tubs I found from a butcher store that went out of business. These tubs are stainless steel and I wash all of my veggies from the garden in them before bringing them into the house. Don't ask me why I think I need 2 washer perhaps I will make my fortune in washing laundry ?? I wouldn't buy one new at todays price. They will certainly last a life time but you can get a bargin and try it out first to see if you will actually like doing laundry this way...I think you will !! Good Luck !!
     
  6. raymilosh

    raymilosh Well-Known Member

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    i use a hand wringer purchased at lehman's. It was their cheapest model. It's OK, but i bet a higer end one would be better. I'd definately wait for a garage sale find or some such, though, as they're pretty pricy. Learning to fold the laundry properly before sending it through the wringer is the biggest trick. That and being prepared to wait a long time for the laundry to dry on a line. A spin type drier gets clothes way drier than a wringer.
    ray
     
  7. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    Never really noticed clothes taking longer to dry on the line with a wringer. I usually put mine through a couple of times. The nice thing also is that you can fold clothes so you almost don't have to iron slacks if you crease them right before sending through the wringer. But...be sure you fold your buttons in...or they could get broken.
     
  8. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum Holly!
     
  9. LittleJohn

    LittleJohn Well-Known Member

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    The purpose of the wringer on the James washer is to get the water out once their clean so they will dry quicker and is only an optional attachment anyway. I havent used one yet but I read if you put very hot water in and let them set for a half hour or so it only takes a couple min of swishing back and forth to get them clean.
     
  10. Dawndra

    Dawndra I'm back

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    I put like 1/8 cup of my homemade laundry soap in a tub & just liet it aggitate longer. It gets things just as clean & I don't have to rinse as much.
     
  11. Ann-NWIowa

    Ann-NWIowa Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I used a wringer for years and enjoyed it. That said, be prepared for broken buttons, broken zippers and flattened hooks. You'll learn the best way to run things through the wringer after a few mistakes and which things are better wrung out by hand. You will certainly save on water and detergent. Watch out for jeans pockets as they'll squirt you - usually in the face! Metal zippers work best if zipped closed and make sure they go through flat. I'm not sure how plastic zippers will survive. A wringer does not get things as dry as the spin cycle in an automatic washer so everything will take longer to dry. Not a problem on a clothes line, but in the dryer it can get expensive fast.
     
  12. DAVID In Wisconsin

    DAVID In Wisconsin Well-Known Member

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    I've had a James washer for about 4 years now. I use it now and again. I cannot use it in summertime when I'm really busy as does take time. The James is a good washer but very overpriced for what you get. I found mine used on the net. I paid about $225.00 for it. If I had paid the $600.00 price tag, I would have returned it. It works well but takes some getting use to. Someone posted about broken zippers and buttons and such. You'll get the hang of it quick enough.
     
  13. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    they are too dangerous, should be outlawed, the powered wringer washers like my Great Grandma had...
     
  14. peacefullone

    peacefullone Member

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    Does anyone know where I can get a good used one? I've seen on ebay, selling for awesome prices, but I can't go to far away states picking them up.

    Holly
     
  15. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    We used one for about 7 years...I'd never go back to them. For one thing I have more important things to do than run clothing through the wringer....like watching paint dry or gardening or napping......even if I go to one of our homesteads that has no power except our generator I'll burn the gas to do laundry.....and I packed the washer and generator as well as the gasoline into the homestead by hand.....2 miles on a foot trail.....we went with the wringer as being a pretty romantic old-timey way to do things...found out that some modern conviences are worth the expense.
     
  16. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I had two of them. Did a couple loads of actual laundry in them for kicks and fail to understand why anyone would want to wash clothes that way. I did discover why my mother had relegated them to the basement. They're a lot of work. The wringers were flat out dangerous. I can see how someone could get the fingers crushed pretty easily.

    I kept them for washing greasy shop rags but I didn't use them enough to justify the space they were taking up. I hauled them both to the dump a year or so ago.

    I keep a couple of old fashioned wash tubs, washboards and a hand wringer just in case. Now that is doing laundry the hard way. I can't imagine washing clothes for a large family like that. I wouldn't want to wash just my clothes like that. My mom (and dad) grew up doing laundry in that really old fashioned way which I think is why she enjoyed and took pride in her modern state of the art washing machine so much.
     
  17. LittleJohn

    LittleJohn Well-Known Member

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    If you are realy looing into the James washer rather than a wringer you might want to start another thread about it no one reads anything except the title, first and last post. ;)
     
  18. peacefullone

    peacefullone Member

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    Ok, starting another thread thanks.

    Holly
     
  19. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    I don't see where they would be a danger ?? The "newer" ones..mine isn't new by any means..if you happen to get something like your fingers or even too much clothing in that wringer...it will "pop" open immediately. I guess it's just the choice we have in doing what we want and liking what we do !! But if I really had to worry about the amount of water I used...I would use a wringer and even if it is a little more actual work...it would save the water. What kind of rush are we in life...it slows you down a little in this busy world of ours. As I mentioned before..look in your local paper or even auctions and you might find a used machine at a reasonable price...or go to your local Senior Citizen center one day and ask one of them...they just might have one they would give away to you for free and the hauling !! Ask Quint on his response where he hauled his to the dump and go dig them out !!!
     
  20. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Helena, too often responsibility for ones own safety is taken away simply because many can't use their brains.

    A good example is where I live and what is being done about driving safety.
    Because a number of IDIOTS failed to stop and yield to traffic and have been killed, an intersection has gone from a east/west stop pattern yielding to north/south through traffic to a four way stop intersection. Additionally the county is now planning a $1 million round-about intersection to replace the four way stop---all because some simply didn't obey the law of stopping at stop signs.

    Rather than advocate doing away with wringer washers let's put safety responsibility back upon the user.