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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there everyone I’m new here

I have two pet rabbits, one male and one female. They are mixed breed and about 5 months old,
I wanted to breed them before I get them fixed. Today I put them together for an hour to see what happened, the female was willing to mate and the male had about 6 fall offs with loud grunts. They are currently living in separate pens and are doing well. Here’s my questions:

Will she definitely be pregnant?

Do I need to put them together again? And what will happen if they breed again while she’s pregnant?

What should I feed the female now she’s pregnant? She currently eats unlimited Timothy hay, 1/4 cup of alfalfa pellets and a cup of veggies (usually collard greens and romaine lettuce)

Should I breed them again on day fourteen to be sure she’s pregnant? I’ve heard this is dangerous though, what do you guys think?

It will be her first litter, is they’re anything bad that might happen that I should be prepared for?

thanks to everyone who reads this and answers my questions :)
 

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Unless she has something physically wrong with her like too much internal fat from the timothy hay, she will be pregnant and probably deliver on day 31. Most of mine deliver at night. No need to put them back together or breed them again. Be sure to get a nesting box in her cage at about day 25 or 26. If you see her grab big mouthfuls of hay and going in and out of the box you know she's nesting and going to give birth.
 

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What are your plans for the offspring? Since these are pet rabbits which you plan on getting "fixed" it sounds like the babies will not end up on the dinner table.

Do you have adequate housing for up to 12 additional rabbits? Those 4 to 6 weeks to weaning age pass rapidly. You need to prepare for additional housing before any babies are born. A grow out cage will be needed once you separate the mother and babies.

You definitely need to have a nest box on hand along with bedding material. Some people use hay but I have found putting pine shavings (not cedar) in the bottom of the box and letting the doe fill the rest with straw (straw does not absorb as much moisture as hay) works very well.

Young, first time mothers may have babies outside of the nest box. They may not pull enough fur to keep the babies warm. Occasionally they may reject the whole litter. Those are the worst possibilities, most does make good nests and care for their babies. Just be prepared for the worst possibilities.

Mark the date you bred them on your calendar. Breeders always say they will remember, few really do. Then count forward 32 days and mark the expected due date. The actual date can be as soon as 28 days or as long as 35 days. A few days before the expected date you need to give her as much quiet time as possible. It's okay to check on her several times a day but you should not pick her up unless it is necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What are your plans for the offspring? Since these are pet rabbits which you plan on getting "fixed" it sounds like the babies will not end up on the dinner table.

Do you have adequate housing for up to 12 additional rabbits? Those 4 to 6 weeks to weaning age pass rapidly. You need to prepare for additional housing before any babies are born. A grow out cage will be needed once you separate the mother and babies.

You definitely need to have a nest box on hand along with bedding material. Some people use hay but I have found putting pine shavings (not cedar) in the bottom of the box and letting the doe fill the rest with straw (straw does not absorb as much moisture as hay) works very well.

Young, first time mothers may have babies outside of the nest box. They may not pull enough fur to keep the babies warm. Occasionally they may reject the whole litter. Those are the worst possibilities, most does make good nests and care for their babies. Just be prepared for the worst possibilities.

Mark the date you bred them on your calendar. Breeders always say they will remember, few really do. Then count forward 32 days and mark the expected due date. The actual date can be as soon as 28 days or as long as 35 days. A few days before the expected date you need to give her as much quiet time as possible. It's okay to check on her several times a day but you should not pick her up unless it is necessary.
Hi there thanks for commenting on my post :)

Here’s the answers to your questions:

It depends on how many babies are born, if 1 or two are born I will keep them as pets. If more are born then I will sell them to good homes. When it comes to housing my rabbits live inside. I have two large metal dog pens setup for them and the live in one each so when the babies are born they will stay in the pen with their mum.
 

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Wire dog crates will not contain wandering baby rabbits. Rabbits are quite good at crawling around before their eyes open. You need to wrap something around the sides of the crate to contain the babies or buy a rabbit cage. Having done both, I would recommend a real rabbit cage. Wrapping a crate is difficult and pretty expensive.

Are your rabbits trained to urinate in a litter pan? If they are I would recommend a rabbit cage that sits on a solid plastic bottom tub. I am not recommending this particular cage but something like it is good.


It would be best to move the doe into a new home as soon as you can, before the babies are born. That would give her time to accept her new home.

Even sibbling rabbits fight. You will eventually need individual homes for any babies you plan to keep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wire dog crates will not contain wandering baby rabbits. Rabbits are quite good at crawling around before their eyes open. You need to wrap something around the sides of the crate to contain the babies or buy a rabbit cage. Having done both, I would recommend a real rabbit cage. Wrapping a crate is difficult and pretty expensive.

Are your rabbits trained to urinate in a litter pan? If they are I would recommend a rabbit cage that sits on a solid plastic bottom tub. I am not recommending this particular cage but something like it is good.


It would be best to move the doe into a new home as soon as you can, before the babies are born. That would give her time to accept her new home.

Even sibbling rabbits fight. You will eventually need individual homes for any babies you plan to keep.
Hi it’s not a dog crate my rabbits are housed in it’s a metal dog playpen, I’ve attracted a picture of one similar to mine and both of my rabbits live in one of these on their own. Thanks for the tips on the wandering babies, I will make sure to modify the pen before the babies are born so that they cannot escape. Yes both of my rabbits are litter trained, however my rabbits used to be free roam in my house and that’s when they were at their happiest so after my females babies have been weaned and sold and both my rabbits have been fixed they will be allowed to free roam again and therefore I don’t want to buy a new cage. Thanks for the recommendation though.
95233
 

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Ah, I understand the housing situation now. If you can find it and figure out a good way to attach it, aluminum window screen would make a good baby blocking material. They can't chew aluminum screen but they can chew fiberglass screen.

Free ranging house rabbits are lots of fun, as long as they don't chew walls or pee on the carpet. I've had a few house rabbits over the years.
 

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Ah, I understand the housing situation now. If you can find it and figure out a good way to attach it, aluminum window screen would make a good baby blocking material. They can't chew aluminum screen but they can chew fiberglass screen.

Free ranging house rabbits are lots of fun, as long as they don't chew walls or pee on the carpet. I've had a few house rabbits over the years.

Yeah when my rabbits where free roam it was really rewarding to see them so happy. My whole house is bunny proofed so they can’t get into anything that they could chew or injure themselves on, and as I said before they are litter trained and in general they both are just good as gold. I have another question and hope you could answer it for me. It was yesterday that I bred my rabbits as you know from my previous posts. However today I was messaging the breeder I bough the rabbits off of and she told me they are siblings, in a state of panic i have been researching online about inbreeding and a lot of websites say that when you breed siblings you will get deformed babies and I am now so worried that my female rabbit will die during labour or her babies will all be deformed. What’s your take on this?
 

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Sibling breeding is a type of line breeding. If the parents are healthy, the babies should be fine.

If you get them fixed, you should be fine just doing the male. Females cost more.

31 days is a average. Some does come early, some later.
Just make sure the doe has a box several days ahead of her due date.
If she poops in box, switch the position in the cage, a different corner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sibling breeding is a type of line breeding. If the parents are healthy, the babies should be fine.

If you get them fixed, you should be fine just doing the male. Females cost more.

31 days is a average. Some does come early, some later.
Just make sure the doe has a box several days ahead of her due date.
If she poops in box, switch the position in the cage, a different corner.
Hi thanks for commenting:)

thanks for the info it’s much appreciated, I have read online and also been told that if I don’t spay the female there’s a chance she can get uterine cancer when she’s older, so that’s why she will be spayed.
 

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We raise meat rabbits.. It is a good idea to feed up the doe with some high protein pellets, and other over and above maintence diet before breeding.. Then periodically during gestation and a bit of boost before birth and during nursing... Mix breed, pet, bunnies may not produce meat to be efficient when you crunch the numbers of kilos of meat to cost of kilos of feed.. That is why we have "giant" breeds meant for meat production. They are livestock, not pets.. My Sweetie is the expert at rabbit husbandry...
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We raise meat rabbits.. It is a good idea to feed up the doe with some high protein pellets, and other over and above maintence diet before breeding.. Then periodically during gestation and a bit of boost before birth and during nursing... Mix breed, pet, bunnies may not produce meat to be efficient when you crunch the numbers of kilos of meat to cost of kilos of feed.. That is why we have "giant" breeds meant for meat production. They are livestock, not pets.. My Sweetie is the expert at rabbit husbandry...
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Hi there thanks for your comment

I definitely won’t me eating my rabbits babies or selling them for their meat. They are my pets.
 

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Your babies should be fine. You would not want to continue inbreeding, like siblings of this litter then siblings of the next litter. Back when certain traits were desired there was a bit of sibling breeding. Some breeders (and not just rabbits) will breed siblings in hopes of producing certain genetic traits.

I have read that intact females will go through a false pregnancy after mating with a neutered male. I don't know how true it is since I've never had a neutered male rabbit.
 
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