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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was asked by mzgarden to post what I grew for my own food. I figured I'd post it here. I do have about three acres I grow on, and a little more I pull from indoor spaces. I do live in Idaho, which is cold and windy and snowy and rainy and can be a challenge for anything less than zone 4, but I'm only growing for me and my animals, so I get enough done.

I pretty much grow year round with the help of a greenhouse, wallipini, and indoor spaces I've coopted.
In winter, I grow broccoli, cauliflower, chard, cabbage, lettuce, spinach, kale, onions, leeks, garlic, radishes, and occasionally brussel sprouts and turnips (if something has not gone horribly, unexpectedly wrong that takes up all my time). I also have mushroom logs that live inside the wallipini in the winter.
In early spring, I do more of the same, as well as celeriac and kohlrabi.
In mid-spring, I start tomatoes, peppers, cucurbits, celery, leaf amaranth, artichokes, and strawberries. There's usually two or three of each tomato type and each sweet pepper type. For hot peppers, I usually prefer a few more mild than hot, so it's mostly just anaheims and jalapenos, but I do get one or two hot ones, like habanero, cayenne, or ghost. Most of the space gets eaten by cucurbits. Each year, there's about 10 cucumbers, 5 eggplants, three gourds, three melons, 10 summer squash, 20 winter squash, and 10 pumpkins. So about 60 cucurbit plants.
In the garden, I plant peas, chickpeas/garbanzos, fava, lentils, endive, and half-hardy roots (carrots, beets, rutabaga, more celeriac and kohlrabi) at the same time, or at the earliest possible convenience, which sometimes isn't until mid-April.
By the end of spring, everything's transplanted and the cold-weather crops have gone to seed for fall planting. The beets, carrots, etc., won't be done until harvest.
As soon as I have space, I either replant with something seasonally appropriate - snap beans, okra, and carrots in summer; greens, onions, cool beans, and hardy roots in fall - or I sew with green manure. I'm partial to clovers and buckwheat for summer, but I've been looking at foul muddammas beans, which are favas for hot weather.
In early fall, I start resewing hardy crops and have filled up the rest of my garden with fall green manure. My standby is wooly pod vetch, because it gets so cussing cold. I wouldn't recommend it for most gardens, since it doesn't protect a great deal of cover or nitrogen, but any's better than nothing. I usually have to pop up greenhouses around anything I want to save by the end of September, which is pretty much all the tomatoes, peppers, and squash (as well as a few of my fruit plants).

By the end of fall, the only things growing are in my greenhouse & wallipini.

For fruit patches, I grow blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, currants, elderberries, and grapes.The orchard grows apples, apricots, cherries, honeyberries, nectarines, peaches, pears, and plums, as well as hickory, chestnut and walnut. I've been looking into getting persimmons, pawpaws, hardy almonds, and hardy kiwis, but they haven't happened quite yet.

I have four grain fields, which take up half an acre by themselves. In the fall, I plant rye, spelt, hard red wheat, and hard white wheat. In spring, I plant oat every year, alternate between hard red and hard white spring wheat, and rotate out my alfalfa, amaranth, barley, buckwheat, flax, millet, quinoa, and sorghum in the other fields every two years. I usually plant two or three different varieties of corn in the garden on top of that.

I also grow edible, medicinal, and culinary herbs and flowers in raised beds in my front and back yard (where the septic tanks are). Mostly, they're perennials like lavender, honeysuckle, and daylilies. I cringe to admit that I buy "annuals" from my local-ish garden center, but I do. They aren't really necessary to survive, but nasturtiums, begonias, gladiouluses are tasty and they don't seed here.

Inside, I have pineapple, pomegranate, lemon, lime, orange, mango, guava, fig, nectarine, bay, jasmine, hibiscus, and orchid plants that pretty much live in there from September 'til May. I do keep herbs inside in the winter - basil, rosemary, ginger - but they're outside a good deal more of the year. I also grow peppers and artichokes inside year round, but it's... well, the produce is rather disappointing for how much time I put in. (It's not its fault, it's just the season.)

I do grow some of this for my animals; a good portion of the leafy greens end up in their pens, but most gets eaten, processed, or sold. I do occasionally get help from my community during the busy seasons, in return for goods and experience, but it's usually 12-16 hours a day during harvest - peak season - and 6-8 in winter. Everything I grow is heirloom, non-gmo, non-chemical organic, which takes longer, but also doesn't kill me and I can save seeds from.

All in all, I grow about 90% of what I personally eat, because the gas station near my (our only "grocery") sells chocolate! (and other goods like baking soda), and there's a family in ...town... that harvests and sells salt.
 

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