Herbs-ideas?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Morria07, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Morria07

    Morria07 Member

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    Ok...I am new to this homesteading. I have a small plot and I grow potatoes, squash, tomatoes, cubumbers and HERBS! I currently have pepperment, chives, sage (two kinds) hyssop, two small finnel (rabbit at the rest...got away before supper)...and a rose bush. Now...what do I do with them...other than the sage and chives...(I used them home grown before.)?
     
  2. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What do you do? You plant MORE!!! ;)

    Seriously, hyssop is nice in soap, also place dried between layers of linens. Smells so fresh!

    I just use the fennel seed in my sausage and red gravy.

    Rose hips are great for jelly and teas. Very high in Vitamin C! But you'll need to add some flavoring, as they have little flavor of their own.

    Pony!
     

  3. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    When you make iced tea, throw in a sprig of mint while the tea is brewing. Yum!
     
  4. Earthbound

    Earthbound Well-Known Member

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    I run them through a food processor and then freeze them into ice cube trays, pop out when frozen, put into ziplocs and then use them in the winter when the herbs are dormant, that way you can enjoy them year round.
    corry
     
  5. Earthbound

    Earthbound Well-Known Member

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    Oh, mint with fresh potato's is divine, mint iced tea, mint juleps, in salads,....fennel is great in or with any fish, in salads, as a hot tea... Hyssop, I'm not sure of.
    corry
     
  6. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Fennel goes well with: Salad, sausage, pork, duck, fish, cabbage, cucumber, onion, herb butter, cheese spread; seeds in desserts and breads. The greens can be used almost interchangeably with dill and the seeds can be used ground in lentil soups, whole in boiling water for rice and brussels sprouts. Seeds and leaves used with fish, in soups, salads and dressings. Use fennel seeds instead of poppy or sesame seeds on bread. Chopped fennel leaves go well with seafood, cheeses and vegetables such as cabbage, carrots, celery, zucchini, cucumber, leek, spinach or onions. Add a few seeds to dried figs, apples, pears, plums or quinces.

    Hyssop goes well with: vegetables, especially beans, and with fatty meats like pork, duck and goose, and a small amount can go into salads. Hyssop is traditionally added to cranberries, stewed peaches or apricots, in drinks, tarts and pies. Use Hyssop instead of mixed herbs when making stuffing for chicken. While the chicken is roasting ,baste it with its own fat or 2 tablespoons melted unsalted butter and a little lemon juice. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon finely chopped hyssop.

    Peppermint: mainly used for sweet things like confectionery and desserts. Use with anything chocolate-y. Spearmint is the one you want for vegetables, tabouleh, mint sauce/jelly for lamb, potato salads etc. Add Peppermint leaves to fruit juices and fruit salads, sprinkled onto pea soup, carrots and zucchini. Add a leaf to a cup of hot chocolate. Dip them into melted chocolate and nibble as an after-dinner treat, or use them to decorate cakes etc.

    Sage goes well with: Meats (especially lamb and veal), stuffings, sausage, poultry, vegetables, cheese, eggs. Good in pork and rabbit dishes, or with root vegetables. Coat leaves in batter and fry to accompany meat dishes.

    Chives go well with: Veal, seafood, creamy sauces, cheese, eggs, potatoes, other vegetables Use the leaves to enhance Oriental or South-western cuisine. Use the ground seeds in rich meaty soups and stews. The leaves can also be added to salads and stirfries. Use leaves on baked potatoes, baked fish, shellfish.

    Roses: you can make jams and jellies and ice cream with the petals. You can make rosewater which is used a lot in confectionery and in Middle Eastern cookery. You can toss petals into salads or use as sandwich filling. For a delicious dessert, marinate a few rose petals with strawberries or cherries and serve with cream or yoghurt. The hips have multiple uses - for syrups, pies, cookies, chutney, sauces, wine, etc. Rosehips can be dried, or pureed and stored in screwtop jars. Use the puree as a sauce for puddings and ice cream, with breakfast cereals or thickened and spread on bread and butter.

    Peppermint Syrup
    3 cups sugar
    1 cup water
    6 tablespoons chopped peppermint

    Dissolve sugar in water and bring to the boil. Add mint and boil for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let stand for 30 minutes. Strain and bottle. Use as a base for summer drinks.

    Vegetable Medley with Hyssop
    1/2 stick celery, diced
    4 carrots, diced
    2 onions, diced
    few leaves cabbage, chopped
    mustard or cress sprouts
    4 tablespoons oil
    1 cup stock
    2 tablespoons cornflour
    small handful hyssop leaves
    salt and cayenne pepper to taste

    Heat oil and saute the vegetables in it for several minutes. Add hyssop and seasonings, then add stock. Cover and cook over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Add the sprouts at the last minute, just for long enough to heat through, then serve immediately. The vegetables should be fairly crisp and chewy.

    Rose Omelette
    8 eggs
    1 teaspoon celery salt
    pinch of marjoram
    1/2 cup rose petals
    paprika

    Blend ingredients at medium speed until eggs are fluffy and petals almost liquefied. Cook as for ordinary omelette. Sprinkle with paprika and garnish with rose petals.

    Rosehip and Apple Cheese
    2kg apples
    60g red rosehips
    300ml fresh orange juice
    150ml water
    1kg raw sugar

    Wash and chop up the unpeeled and uncored apples. Slice the rosehips and tie them in a muslin bag. Put the apples and rose hips into a preserving pan with the orange juice and water and cook over low heat with the lid on until the apples are soft and pulpy. Remove the bag of rose hips and discard. Press the apples through a sieve and measure the purée. For every 500g allow 500g of sugar. Put the pulp and the sugar into the pan, and cook over medium heat, uncovered, until very thick, about 1 hour. Stir frequently to prevent burning or sticking. Spoon into jars while hot. Serve this preserve with all kinds of meat, or on warm new bread, fresh scones or hot buttered toast.
     
  7. Morria07

    Morria07 Member

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    I just had two tree addentidied on my land...I have two well established crabapples!!! Now what to do with them? LOL. I know the fruit is edible...but how?
     
  8. rain4me

    rain4me it's all good

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    Couldn't tell you about crabapples (but I bet somebody can!) but I can give you more suggestions for your herbs.

    That peppermint should get very prolific for you, and it does well to be cut back. Harvest and dry the cuttings for tea. Store in an airtight container away from direct light. Not only is it tasty and cooling, but it's good for upset tummies and assistes digestion, and nice to drink when you have a cold or stuffy nose. I find it to be mildly anti-viral, as well.

    Dried sage leaf makes a potent tea for night-sweats and for any ailment that calls for an astringent. It's also good for stimulating mental clarity...there's a reason why a wise person is known as a 'sage' ;) Dry some of the sage too for 'smudging' or burning as incense.

    Dried fennel seeds, chewed or made into tea, are excellent for digestion and to relieve gas. Too bad the rabbits got ahold of it!

    Cover fresh rose petals with an equal amount of raw honey, let sit for 6 weeks....yum! Also an excellent face moisturizer for dry skin.

    And I'll echo what I think Pony said....plant MORE! :)
     
  9. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Oh, GOODY! :dance:

    If they're the nice larger sized crab apple (about 1/4 the size of a regular apple) you can pickle them with cinnamon and spices. You can still put them up if they're smaller apples, but it's not as much fun. ;) I'm at the office right now, so I don't have the recipe handy, but I'll look for it tonight.

    Also, crab apples are LOADED with pectin. So you can make mint apple jelly, and many other tasty things.

    Oh, I lust for a GOOD (i.e. non-decorative) crab apple tree!

    Pony!
     
  10. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Pectin, Home-Made
    Chop 1kg apple peelings and cores (or whole sour cooking apples or crab apples), cover with 4 1/2 cups water, and simmer gently, stirring occasionally, for about 45 minutes or until pulpy. Pour the contents of the pan into a scalded jelly bag suspended over a large bowl and leave to drain, undisturbed, in a cool place for 8-12 hours. Put 1 teaspoon of the strained juice in a jar and add 1 tablespoon grain alcohol. Cover the jar and shake it, then leave to stand for 5 minutes. If a jelly-like clot forms (pectin extract), then the juice has a good pectin content. This test can also be used to test the pectin content of fruit after it has had its first cooking. Store the pectin extract in the refrigerator. Use 1 1/4 cups of the extract for every 2kg low-pectin fruit and add it to the fruit after it has been cooked but before the sugar is added.

    Savoury Herb Jelly
    2kg tart cooking apples or crab apples, roughly chopped
    900ml water
    300ml wine vinegar
    good handful of fresh herbs
    360g sugar per 600ml juice

    Boil the apples with the water and vinegar. Add the herbs and simmer. Cook until the apples are soft. Strain through muslin overnight. Measure the juice, return to the saucepan and add the sugar. Stir to dissolve the sugar, then boil until setting point is reached, taking care not to let it boil over. Allow to cool for about 10 minutes. Pour into sterilized jars and add a few leaves as decoration if desired. Store in a cool, dark cupboard. Suitable herbs are Basil, Mint, Rosemary, Sage, Savory, Thyme.

    A sweet jelly may be made in the same way, but instead of vinegar, substitute 1 litre of water. Suitable herbs for sweet jellies are Bergamot, Calendula, Lavender flowers, Lemon Balm, Lemon Verbena, Scented Geranium leaves (Rose, Apple, Peppermint, Lemon, Lime), Violet.

    Crab Apple Jelly
    Cook the crab-apples with 6 cloves and 2cm of ginger until the fruit is soft. Strain, boil again and add 375g of sugar to every 600ml of liquid. Let boil until it jells. To make a successful jelly, the fruit should not be cooked too long, and the sugar should be added just before the strained liquid boils.