Herbalists-need advice on anti-fungal herbs

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by homebody, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. homebody

    homebody Well-Known Member

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    Someone has asked me about herbs for a fungal infection (also is a contact dermatitis) on palms of her hands. She has been a florist for 20+ years. Besides gloves, what else can I tell her or what herbs(topical ointment) can I suggest to her? Has already been to dermatologist; using some kind of cream, helps a little. Thanks :)
     
  2. KRH

    KRH Resident Wino

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    Tea Tree Oil works well as a topical antifungal. I use a Tea Tree soap my wife orders from earthlydelightsoap. Keeps athletes foot at bay as well.
     

  3. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yep, Tea-Tree oil and also Eucalyptus oil for fungus type problems. I have used lemon essential oil on ringworm before, but for any other type of fungus I try the first two.
     
  4. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yup...I also recommend Tea Tree Oil. Even my dermatologist recommends it for fungal infections.
     
  5. BillyGoat

    BillyGoat Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if differant fungi react to differant treatments.

    A girl I use to work with had exema(sp?) real bad. Her forarms would welt up and have bad red rashes, almost blistering.

    I told her to get a 'green' tomato, slice it thin and lay it on the affect area for 10-15 minutes. The next day al there was, was a slight redness left.

    Tea tree oil is good for toenail fungus. So is peroxide.

    Or she can try the wonder all salve!

    www.supersalve.com
     
  6. ttryin

    ttryin Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    Hope I'm not sawing off the limb I'm sitting on by answering this one ...

    One should know the cause of a rash on a florist's hands before treatment. There is a theory that a rash is an indication that the first "line of defense" of the immune system is threatened. The suggestion is to remove the cause before treating the rash, if at all possible.

    I have read about the chemicals used in growing cut flowers and the suffering of people who handle the flowers. Perhaps gloves would help after the rash goes away. A google search will give more info.

    Best of luck with healing.

    T