Herbalists, help!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Rita, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I placed an order for various herbal products and one of the products listed was licorice sticks. Well, I love licorice but was really surprised when I opened the pkg. These are licorice roots. Now my question is what do I do with them? If I use them in tea do I grind them up first. Is it possible to make real licorice candy with them? Any help will be appreciated as I hate to waste them. Not worth sending them back. Thanks, Rita
     
  2. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can chew on them if you want. Here is some more info:

    http://www.holoweb.com/cannon/wildd.htm

    Licorice is a popular remedy for cough, some complications of tuberculosis, and chest complaints in general, such as bronchitis. Because of its soothing properties, it often is used in cough medicines. It is also highly regarded as a soothing ingredient for sore throat and laryngitis. The Chinese have also used licorice to strengthen and balance the female reproductive system. Some compounds found in licorice are thought to help the adrenal glands function more smoothly in conditions of stress and exhaustion. The adrenal glands are responsible for hormones that keep the body systems balanced. Naturopaths have used licorice in treating hypoglycemia, diabetes and Addison's disease, which is a malfunction of the adrenal glands.

    Naturally sweet licorice root has been used for thousands of years to treat coughs, lung congestion, constipation and relieve inflammation of mucus membranes. The Greeks wrote about it over 2,300 years ago, and extract from the roots of glycyrrhizin has been used throughout Europe. For over forty years, it's been a prescription drug in Japan to treat inflammatory illnesses such as ulcers and chronic liver disease. It is also used to decrease allergic reactions to other drugs.

    here are some precautions:
    http://www.nutritional-supplement-info.com/licorice-root-side-effects.html

    how to prepare:
    http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/nmdrugprofiles/herbaldrugs/101700.shtml

    another good article:
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/DIY/1982_July_August/Herb_Garden_Licorice
     

  3. phantompark

    phantompark Well-Known Member

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    Can't beat the previouos post to mine.
    I do use licorice root in an herbal tea combination for imflammed sore throats. But this is a combo recommended by an herbalist/naturopath I consult with.
    You may want to return it if you aren't sure how to use it.
     
  4. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the info and the jog to my memory to have a look at what recipes that might be on the internet. I have found two recipes for licorice candy that I will try. Rita
     
  5. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    A little-known fact is that there is little or no real liquorice in commercial liquorice confectionery! Instead, it's flavoured with aniseed. The confectionery made from the real stuff is quite different.

    As you've discovered, the real liquorice comes from the root of the plant Glycyrrhiza glabra. It is notorious for raising the blood pressure! It's definitely a herb to be used under expert supervision, and even then with caution. (see Warning, below.)

    Medicinal Uses: Used to treat inflammatory conditions of the digestive system, urinary tract infections, sore throat, chest complaints, peptic ulcers, rheumatism, menstrual cramps, arthritis, constipation and to stimulate the adrenal glands. It is given for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, liver disease, including hepatitis and cirrhosis. Liquorice strengthens the immune system and is diuretic and laxative. It is a good source of the female hormone, oestrogen. The roots contain glycyrrhizin which is 50 times sweeter than sugar. Sprinkling some dried root powder on clean sores may help heal herpes. Liquorice is used in lozenges and cough syrups to treat symptoms of sore throat, colds and flu. Chewing on a piece of liquorice root is reputed to reduce cravings for nicotine. Also used to flavour medicines. In ointment, it is used externally for eczema, psoriasis, burns, boils, sores, ulcers and redness of the skin. Added to shampoos for men, it may reduce a tendency to pattern baldness.

    Usual Dosage: Put 1/2-1 teaspoonful of the root in a cup of water, bring to the boil and simmer for 10-15 minutes. Take three times a day. Best taken with boiled milk.

    Warning: Liquorice should not be used by those suffering from high blood pressure, fluid retention, headache, vertigo, cirrhosis of the liver, diabetes, glaucoma, heart disease or a history of stroke, kidney disease, heart disease, or by those who are obese. Best avoided when pregnant or lactating. May cause water retention and loss of potassium. Do not use for more than 4 weeks consecutively. Professional supervision is recommended.