Herbal lawn

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by minnikin1, May 18, 2005.

  1. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    The fragrances this spring are so intense and lovely, I don't think I've ever known the pastures to be so lush and rich. I just want to stand there, breathing it in.
    It got me to thinking that it would be nice to lose the grass lawn this year and trade up to something more fragrant and appealing.

    I found a site - link is at bottom of message - that discusses using
    some varieties of oregano.
    I've always wanted to put in chamomile for that apple scent and the soft look.
    Mother of thyme or walk-on-me plant is always recommended.
    John Jeavons, in one of his older books, also recommended dwarf yarrow, birdsfoot trefoil, white dutch clover.

    I'm thinking wormwood or artemesia seems like it would "fit in" but don't know if they would adapt to occasional cutting.
    Of course sweet woodruff could be included in the shadier areas, I'm thinking.
    Near the water spigot I'm dreaming of a luscious cocoa-mint I munched on at the garden center... I wonder if it would make a good tea....
    I'm swimming in ideas, but would love to chat about what's really practical.

    Our "lawn" area is very small. We have some foot traffic - but not daily. Living in zone 5.

    BTW, here is the link to the oregano people:
    http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/oreganolawn.htm
     
  2. minnikin1

    minnikin1 Shepherd

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    Not one response!
    Are you all devoted to weekly lawn mowing?
    Anybody growing herbs?
    Maybe I need to bump this in January when you're in the dreaming mood?
     

  3. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    Wormwood? Not wormwood! It is so difficult to eradicate (year three here)....you might regret it.

    I grow plenty of herbs, but also lawn. I figure years from now I will revert to mowing only paths!
     
  4. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Actually had a friend pull out his yard and plant various flowers.Most folks loved it,but a couple didnt and got code enforcement all over him,like a pile of woodchips delivered,code enforcement was at his place in 30 minutes,I kid you not.
    Orange California,way too many tax dollars at work.
    Personally,I love your idea.

    BooBoo
     
  5. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    Jefferson had the White House Lawn done in chamomile when he was president. I have thyme in my pathway for a dust stopper. I think you should just try stuff next year.
    BTW, Zone 5 also.
     
  6. frogmammy

    frogmammy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sullen,

    Thyme as a dust stopper? Never heard of that!

    Mon
     
  7. Vera

    Vera Well-Known Member

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    Minnikin, when I bought my place 9 years ago, the ground was pretty much dead all over (the previous owner had mowed it down to bare dirt just before the weeks of intense high-altitude sun and no rain hit). I never had the money or time to invest in planting grass or anything, but I let nature take its course (helped along with local chicken & rabbit & horse manure as well as mowings from the berms and such)... I have native grasses and wildflowers now, and a thick carpet of local mallow in one area of the yard (the rabbits' preferred greens). Wouldn't trade it for plain grass if someone paid for it :) Oh - if you walk around your neighborhood and collect wildflower seeds and toss them into your yard, you'll hurry the flower part along quite a bit.

    There are several plants which I don't know the name of, they're intensely fragrant especially when walked on. "Weeds", of course, LOL! I haven't had much luck with traditional garden herbs... they don't seem to like this here climate and need too much pampering. But the weeds do just fine as far as decorating and perfuming the yard goes.

    A note on mint: it spreads very quickly without any consideration for your landscaping plans.