Help!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by 3sunz, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. 3sunz

    3sunz Well-Known Member

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    My boys got 2 goats last night. It was very unexpected. Someone we know was moving and couldn't take them. I have never had goats, I don't know what to do with them. I went to the feed store this morning and bought some feed. The goats are acting very wild. Is this normal? They are dwarf nigerians. Maybe mixed with something, I don't know. They don't have any papers. We are on our way back to town to get material to build a fenced area for them. Hopefully, they will calm down soon, or we may not be able to keep them.... Any advice you can offer is greatly appreciated as I know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!!!!!! Thank you.
     
  2. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Are you spending time with them, they may want some attention. You are going to have to get a wormer, if you can find out what type their previous owner was using use it if not ivomec should work, you can get it at Tracter supply or online. You are also going to have to give them a CD/T vaccination, which you can get at Hoegger Goat Supply on the internet. If they have horns you will want a fence that they can not get their heads throught the holes. For feed you can use sweet feed, but not too much a cup a day will be fine, and keep baking soda around in case of bloat. Make sure that they have plenty of hay and or grass, and you should make sure that they do not eat too much grain because they can get urinary calculi and die, that is were their urinary tract gets bloked and their baldder bursts. How old are they, if they are babies you might want to castrate them, unless you plan on breeding them in the future. Hope this helps, Bye.
     

  3. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    first, they are probably terrified. they are somewhere they arent used to, and thier whole schedule just changed. goats dont like that. they will calm down. make sure the pen is sturdy. use actuall fencing, not the 2"x4" fence, this will not hold up. use actual goat fence, more expensive, but will acutally work for goats. 4' fence is the average height to a goat pen, no shorter. make sure to enforce corners and make gate posts wooden. they need a shed or dog houses. make sure these are not next to the fence, or they will jump out.
    they will need shots every year, a cd/t . look up "large animal vets" and call and see if they have experience with goats. unless the place you got them from told you about the goats, you should go in for a check-up and get them the cd/t shot.
    also, what is the sex of the animals? if they are bucks, (uncastrated) then you should also get them fixed while you are at the vet. if they are to old to be banded, they cut the bottom of the scrotum off and cut out the testicles. this may sound mean, but unless you like being advanced upon by your goat, or bein peed on or smelling that wonderfull buck smell, you need him fixed. no alfalfa hay for bucks either.
    if they are wethers (castrated) be carefull about feeding them. no alfalfa hay. this will cause urinary calculi., bladder stones. wethers are usually the best of pets.
    if you goats are does, you have the choice of breeding them, and since they are a small dairy breed, then you can enjoy fresh milk. also the babies are just darling!!! :D
    also, ask questions here! i have learned here as well. i love coming to this forum b/c it answers my questions within the day or even the hour. i come here at least twice aday, just to look around and maybe even help someone out. have fun with your new goatties!! ;)
     
  4. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    One of the easiest ways to calm them is to grab a book, a lawnchair, and a cup of corn and sit in the pen for several hours a day until they are calm enough to put their fears aside and grab some snacks.

    Our first goats took about 3 - 4 days to really figure out the whole "green cup" thing and will do anything for grean cup. We feed them very little grain or corn (only a small snack at night) and corn in cup is still a special treat that they'd do just about anything for. This sure paid off when we had a very ill goat last winter and needed to give him 3 shots and an oral med every day for 10 days. One of the shots really stung, but that goat would voluntarily come up to the gate and into the laundry room for shots if he thought he'd get goodies from the green cup.

    We've got a young calf in ox training now, and she's figured out what a pocket sized green cup means. Big old calf will do anything if she thinks he might get a kernal or two of corn eventually. You'd be amazed how precious just a couple of kernals can be.

    Lynda
     
  5. 3sunz

    3sunz Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for much for all of the information. I just went and bought goat fencing. It was rather expensive, so I hope this works out. The 2 goats that we got are female. We have them in a 10x10 dog kennel right now, but that is for my dogs so I need to get the goats out. The dogs are not in there with the goats, but the dogs need their house back! lol. When we went out this morning to try to catch them (so they could go out for awhile), they went crazy. It took us awhile to finally catch both of them. I don't think they like us very much right now, ;) Please provide me with any information that you may have that you think would be useful for me. I am kind of "iffy" about keeping them, right now. I just hope they will calm down. Do you know about how long it will take for them to get used to being here? Also, if we do keep them, what is the best breed to breed them with? I don't know of very many people who have goats, so I am not sure of what different breeds I will come across here. I am not even sure that these goats that I have are "purebred". Maybe I will try to post a picture later. Right now, I have to go put up a fence!
     
  6. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They likely are scared, but even if they are not at all tame, you can tame them. Once you get them in a pen and start caring for them, they should start settling down. They need a sturdy fence, and they need shelter. If you don't have plenty of browse, they need a good hay. Goats normally will not eat hay off the ground, so you'll need a hay rack or at least put it in a bucket. Always talk to them calmly, and move calmly around them. Chasing them is not a good idea. Teach them to come to a feed bucket. Pat them when they come to eat and talk to them. You can give them a little grain twice a day, but don't leave it out for them, and don't give much at a time. Goats will eat themselves dead. They can have hay out all the time.
    When you start looking around to breed them, think small since they are a miniature breed.
    mary
     
  7. wwoodacres

    wwoodacres Active Member

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    good luck a friend gave me 2 wethers a year ago, pygmys, i now have 28 nigerian dwarfs and pygmys. there addictive and breeding them is the greatest joy when you see that tiny baby playing. there great!!
     
  8. 3sunz

    3sunz Well-Known Member

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    Don't say that!!! My kids started with 6 chickens in April. We now have 22 chickens and 6 turkeys! lol. I was just hoping to keep it to a minimum with the 2 goats...
     
  9. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    you can breed nigerians to pygmies or other nigerians. do not breed them to any large breeds. it may kill the doe, since nigerians are so small, and the babies would be too large. they are good milkers.
    another thing i forgot to add earlier was to get a mineral feeder. this is a two sided dish thing. in one side put mineral salt, and in the other side put baking soda. then mount the the dish in a tall storage tub, so it is easy to remove. then mount the storage tub to the fencing. that way, the salt and baking soda wont get nasty. goats need both of these things to be healthy. the baking soda helps keep thier rumen from becoming too acidic. (tummy ache) and keeps them from bloating as well. go to www.jefferslivestock.com and type in "mineral feeder" for the search item. its' the second product down. now that you know what it is and looks like, you may even be able to find it in your local feed store.
    another thing i reccomend is having places to get goat supplies. my favorites are www.jefferslivestock.com , www.thegoatstore.com (hoegger goat supply), www.caprinesupply.com (caprine goat supply) . Jeffers has great prices. hoegger has lots of milking supplys, and caprine has general supplies. you can requestt paper mail order catalogs from all three.
    another thing you will need is goat houses or a shed. you can get a metal storage shed , 10'x8' for about 300.00, and can house up to i think 10 nigerians. or you can go with dog houses, which also work well. if you have an old truck cap, that also works well, as long as it still closes.
    a fast way to tame them is to put collars on them.then get individual dishes for them. put a leash handle over the t-post of the fencing. they dont get fed unless they come up to you to hook them to thier individual spots. i do this here, and so far, so good. i havent had a goat refuse to come to me for more than one feeding. it also keeps them from getting more than thier equal share of food, and allows you to trim thier hooves while they eat.
    if you do need to get rid of them, i would be interested...... :D

    if you have any questions you can always e mail me at dumass49230@hotmail.com.
     
  10. 3sunz

    3sunz Well-Known Member

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    mygoat-
    Thanks for all of the information. I will definitely let you know if this does not work out for us. 1 of them seems to be a little more agressive than the other... I am hoping they will calm down, soon. I don't know how long I can stand this. lol.

    I am also keeping your email handy. You may be hearing from me. :)

    I forgot to ask earlier, is it normal for females to have horns, too? I know this may be a stupid question, but remember I know NOTHING about goats. One of the goats has small horns, about 4 inches, I guess.
     
  11. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    yes almost every breed of goats that i know of are born with horns, male or female. some breeds have polled animals, meaning that they are born without horns. how old are these goats? if they are only 4" or so, i would say older than 6 mon. but that is judging with pygmies, so im not all to sure. your goat that does not have horns was probably dehorned at a few days old. this is also called disbudding. dehorning is kind of gross and cruel,imho, which is why i dont do it around here. it is when you take an extremly hot iron ( i dont know exactly how hot) and you place it over the horn bud. it stopps circulation to the bud and causes it to fall off in a few weeks. i am guessing that the more dominant doe is the one with horns, unless she is younger. imo, goats will not hurt each other without reason. new goats are always put in thier place by the "herd queen". i usually trim the very tip of my goats horns to keep them from being too sharp. mostly, though, my herd queen only uses the flat of her horns, and is careful with them.
    do not tolerate any butting of people at all. use a spray bottle to discourage this. dont discipline at all, however, untill they are tamed.
    ill be waiting for an e-mail!!
    have fun with your new ladies!! :D
     
  12. 3sunz

    3sunz Well-Known Member

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    I went out and took another look. They are probably smaller than4". The guy that gave me the goats said they are 6 months old. But, I have begun to question some other things he has told me about other animals I have gotten from him...

    Should I do anything with the horns? Or do I just leave them as they are? Actually, the goat that doesn't have horns is the one that is the most aggressive?!?! She is a little bigger than the goat with horns. My sons have named them Honey and Daisy. And they may end up coming to see you!!! lol
     
  13. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    if the dehorned one is more agressive, it is either older, or it was the daughter of a more dominant female. goats have a strict pecking order, as well. how is thier taming process coming?
     
  14. 3sunz

    3sunz Well-Known Member

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    They have let me get a little closer to them. Seems like a slow process!! lol
     
  15. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    When we brought our first goats home a few weeks ago, I thought "Boy have we made a big mistake with these evil goats!" Within a week they were completely settled down and like totally different animals. They even like our dogs! Now I can't imagine ever being without some goats . . .
     
  16. 3sunz

    3sunz Well-Known Member

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    They seem to be a little calmer today. Although, 1 of the goats got away from my oldest son (he's 12yo). We had them walking on leashes, trying to interact with them. And the goat took off. We are still trying to catch her. Been about 3 hours, now. I am just hoping that with each day that goes by, they will get a little better. :)
     
  17. Milk n' Honey

    Milk n' Honey Well-Known Member

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    It is also very possible that the folks who has them before didn't spend much time with them. We have a goat that is not trained to lead or be handled much. When we first got him, he screamed and hollered a lot a wouldn't come near us. He would jump out of his skin when we reached towards him. Now he'll come to the fence and lick our fingers and allow us to pet him a bit. He still won't stand for grooming or anything but we just kind of let him be and didn't push him. Goats are very intelligent. He has learned that we aren't so bad. We feed and water him, after all!! This is our first year with goats also. I've done so much reading!! This website is awesome for learning from others. This boy goat of ours is a Boer buck and he is in his first rut. He is smelling so bad. I think we may use him for breeding and move him on his way. I don't want to feed a buck all winter and he is smelling up a large area on the property. Besides, my does' milk turned so bad from being around him that I had to dry them up early. We didn't know about the buck smell turning the milk but let me tell you, it does. The milk tastes exactly like he smells. There is no question to me. We brought a new goat in and her milk was fine until we subjected her to him. Hers went bad too!! Good luck with your new goats. I can see where this could get addicting. I love the goats more than anything. The worst thing I've been dealing with is that I seem to keep getting poision ivy breakouts now. I am very allergic to it and I think they might be getting into and then I pet them and the rest is history. I don't know what to do about this but I'm tired of having poison ivy breakouts!! Good luck again!!