Help with my twins....!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Kyla206, May 2, 2006.

  1. Kyla206

    Kyla206 Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Location:
    Iowa
    Woke up to find their mom dead, looks like she had her head through the fence & by the time she got unstuck it was too late. :( She was a rescue with horns. The twins are exactly one month old, what now? I have calf milk replacer, can I bottle them with that? And, how much per day? I feel so terrible for them, but without lining my fence with chicken wire, if I had saved her this time, she would have most likely done it again when I wasn't around. Thanks for your help!
     
  2. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,569
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    CHINA
    Store milk is better but you can bottle feed them...make sure the bottle/milk is about 100 degrees and put a little molasses on the tip to interest them...they may also need to get real hungry before you have any bottle success....How much grain and hay are they eating? Chewing cuds at all?
     

  3. michael1

    michael1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    74
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Texas
    Hi, sorry about your nanny. I lost one after she gave us quads in November and I still feel bad about it. I was given a formula for bottle feeding goats by someone who told me it would prevent the little ones from getting scours. I've raised two healthy (maybe a tad too heavy) babies on this and it worked for me.
    1 gallon whole milk
    1 gallon of milk replacer (prepared with recommended amount of water)
    1/2 gallon of buttermilk.

    As far as quantity given, I would feed them 3 times a day as much as they wanted. I may have over fed, but since I wasn't there all the time I could only feed them on a limited schedule. At about 2 months I would reduce to 2 bottles a day, then down to one and finally (a joyful day) completely off. My wife made a holder out of wood and velcro to hold the bottle to a stall in the barn. This was great because I didn't have to hold the darn thing for 10 minutes.