HELP What breed should I choose

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by TSYORK, Nov 29, 2006.

  1. TSYORK

    TSYORK Jhn Boy ina D Trump world

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    I am beginning my search to get a couple feeder pigs for the dinner table in a few months. My wife is terrified of pigs, and neither of us know anything about raising them. We raise egg layers, meat birds, and goats, so the pigs we'll be a new adventure for us. The only thing I'm really looking for is decent size in the shortest amount of time possible. BTW I'm going to be feeding them organically, no powdered mixes. In addition to wanting the most bacon for my buck; I would like a breed that is as docile as pigs come

    What do you all recommend?

    Thanks,
    Shannon
     
  2. MoBarger

    MoBarger Goat's Milk soap for sale

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    maybe for your first time out you should aim more for health and hardiness and less for breed? Find a pig farmer in your area and get 2-3 piglets from there to raise.
    Our friend raises pigs for living. He breeds not for purebred hogs, but for market. He breeds longer hogs that will give more bacon, and nice hams. They are healthy and hardy. We get them at 5-6 weeks, they are cut and wormed.
    As you get more familiar with how to raise pigs and their needs etc, you can find a breeder of the breed you want to go with and spend the $ for those piggies.
     

  3. TSYORK

    TSYORK Jhn Boy ina D Trump world

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    But I sort of want to know what breeds have the qualities of being docile? Is the the Chester Whites, Durocs, Tamfords, etc? In my initial posting I didn't mean they had to be purebred, I was just wanting to know which combo would be a good one to start with.






     
  4. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    The Herford Hogs are quite Docile. They are also long and Lean. We have found the Herford crosses with other more mainstream breeds such as Yorkshire and Duroc to be of docile and reasonable disposition as well.
     
  5. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Shannon, most breeds are reasonably quiet and docile and much has to do with the handling of them. Sadly :Bawling: I've not had any experience with the Hereford but from Up North's post they would seem to be a laid back breed. I find the Duroc an easy-care, do-well pig with a very good temperament to the point that I've had pigs come back to me because purchasers who bought them from the freezer couldn't kill them. They were just too friendly so I have two extra sows that I hadn't bargained for. The Duroc/Large White (Yorkshire) is a good cross, and my experience with Hampshire and Berkshire has also been good.

    As a beginner, I don't think you could go too far wrong with any of the mainstream breeds.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  6. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    May I make a suggestion based on experience of the unexperienced. Have the complete facilities ready BEFORE you purchase your pigs.

    A strong pen, 24 hour feeding system, a 24 hour watering system, a mud hole for summertime are a blessing also.

    Interact with your pigs from the very start and continue untill butcher time. This will help with your wife's fears also as she learns pigs and hogs can be friendly and fun. Put a 5 gal bucket in for them to play with and feed them treats now and then.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Good luck and enjoy.
     
  7. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    We had yorkshires last time and have york/hampshire crosses this time. They've all been very friendly and were easy to get back in the pen the few times they got out (that doesn't happen any more since we've learned all their escape plans.) I agree with the posts that you'll likely have success with any of the modern breeds and that the key to keeping them happy is giving them attention. Still, pigs are large animals and are omnivores, and as such can be quite dangerous

    Others that have posted on here say that the less common breeds bring more $ if you are planning on selling them, especially the darker colored ones. I can get pink pigs for very cheap from a local man that put on weight very rapidly and I have never been disappointed.

    'Usband o'G
     
  8. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    The most important thing is availability. That may sound like an odd criteria but it can be hard to find piglets some times, some places.

    We have Yorkshire with a dab of some other breeds in them. They are excellent, friendly animals. Like any large animal with hooves (nails) and teeth you do need to be careful but we have never been harmed by our pigs.

    I would _not_ suggest feeding from your hand to avoid getting your fingers nipped. Drop the food on the ground or in their feeder.

    Enjoy your pigs!

    -Walter
    in Vermont
     
  9. okiemom

    okiemom Well-Known Member

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    I too was nervous about starting w/ pigs. I got a pot belly x from Judy at Tabletop homestead. I really liked that cross because I could learn about pigs w/o them being so big. I had to have surgery so I had to get rid of them, but I would do a cross again in a heartbeat. I wanted the adults to reach no more than 300lbs full grown.

    For this start, I bought 3 feeders and am loving it. we had a carport 20x20 that we are using. they have a central hut inside and free food and water. The free food keeps them calm. No dinner time agression.

    When they get to size or when they are no longer "cute" meaning I feel threatened they will go to butcher. Chickens roost and eat in there w/ them and the pigs have not hurt any. The chickens do a great job of keeping everything clean.
     
  10. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    i find feeding 3x a day they grow faster free feeding they seem to pick to much i made a small house then hinged the front wall to clean or open in summer you can see it on our site
     
  11. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Butcher hogs generally do not live long enough to get nasty. Just get what is locally available and don't worry about it. This is something to consider when buying breeding stock, not feeder pigs.
     
  12. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    The piggies I've had have all started sweet as pie. They will get very excited when feeding tho. If you give them a little smack on the butt when they push or nudge they will be well behaved. They are kinder and smarter than a dog. Little ones will cuddle like a cat. But they all stink like pig S---. Treat them good. Bring them treats. They will grow fast and be gone all too soon.

    I MUST ADMIT IT!!!!!! I LOVE PIGS.