HELP! Unexpectedly acquired a pig and dont know what to do now!

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Qvrfullmidwife, May 22, 2005.

  1. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife Well-Known Member

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    Today we unexpectedly ended up with a 10-12 week old female Ossabaw Island Hog. We had been occasionally discussing getting a feeder pig as something for 'eventually'.

    Now that 'eventually' is NOW, we need some advice, but FAST! :rolleyes: Tonight said hog is sleeping in a dog crate. Tomorrow we get to work getting her set up.

    Fencing--will the hog panels that I have seen at Tractor Supply work? If not, what will? How much space should we give her? The area that we have set aside for her is largely shaded, in a clearing in a somewhat wooded area, visible frm the house. Does she need a wet/wallow area? How best to construct that, or will she do it for herself?

    They said that she has been on "hog finisher' feed for a few weeks, now. Is this appropriate? If not, what would be better? Food goes on the ground (as she was being fed where we got her), or...? Water in buckets or ???

    Any regular vaccines or meds?

    Other advice? Our goal is for her to grace the table, but we are acknowledging that this may be a regular thing, or if it works out well, it is possibloe that we get a breeding pari next year, so we do want to make sure that what we construct will be suitable for the long term.

    Thanks in advance for helping someone who never thought that she would have a pig in her backyard, as it were... :haha:
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    The hog panels will work fine and they go up quickly. They are 16' long and a pen 16' X 16' is fine for one hog. I would build the pen as large as you can afford and have room for, though. Especially if you think you may get more hogs later. Also, the more room the pig(s) have the less you have to deal with the "pig" smell.

    Hog finisher should be fine at this point. A little higher protein would have probably been better earlier, but if that's what she's eating now I'd stick with it. I would build or buy some type of trough to feed her in. You won't waste as much feed as feeding her straight on the ground.

    It gets hot in Texas like here so you will need a wallow. I just let the water run slowly into the water trough and overflow. She'll wallow it out like she wants it. If you don't want to do that just take the hose and wet it down good twice a day.

    Don't medicate unless she's sick.
     

  3. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    if there's a creek in that woods, try to enclose that and the pig will do what she wants with it and you wont need to make a wallow or water her, (assuming the water in the creek is safe) Panels will work to a point, it depends on how much space they have, and how well you have the panels secured, I have seen a boar bend up a corner of a panel, and thentwist and pull until he made a gate. He enjoyed the trail of corn leading back into the pen, and I then worked faster to enclose a pasture. The more space they have, the less incentive they have to get out
     
  4. Mike in Pa

    Mike in Pa Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the first response as far as space requirements but I thought "finisher" was a lower protein than grower. Should use grower I think. I don't use either .. mix my own. You'll be fine with what you have, might not be optimum that's all ... what's another week or two to grow.
    Agree also, no medicated feed or meds unless sick. Might want to worm though?
     
  5. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    Glad to know that I'm not the only one with a unexpected pig in the back yard. Kept mine in a chicken tractor for the first couple weeks.

    We went with the pig tractor idea. You take 3 hog panels, cut 1 in half. Wire 4 foot 4x4's in the corners to form a 16x8 foot pen. I used a 5 gal bucket, secured on top of the corner I built a shelter in, with a nipple waterer. I used some boards, tarp and metal roofing to make the shelter. I might have to redo it. We'll see. We are using a large rubber dish for a feed bowl.

    So far our pig is doing great, but this is my first one. We'll see how the summer goes.

    Happy adventure!
    Jennifer
     
  6. 2story

    2story Well-Known Member

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    worm at 100 pounds. 18% feed to start out, then 14%. (14 all the time will work but results are a little slower) a wallow is not a necesity,she will probably make her own weather you like it or not. Raising Pigs Sucessfully is a great book on the subject for about 10.oo new.
     
  7. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

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    Hi Midwife,

    If you know this is an Ossabaw Island pig for sure, you have fallen heir to a critically rare breed, according to the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy. Here is a loink to more information on the subject:

    http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/swine/ossabawisland/index.htm

    As the article states, there are only about 200 of these on the mainland. If it were I who had gotten such a windfall, I would try to use her as breeding stock via AI or whatever means possible so as to help increase the numbers. As a rare heritage breed, weaners could be sold to others interested in conserving this breed, often at a higher price than your garden vatiety pig. I would certainly not eat her, but that is just me.

    Good luck with your new pig, whatever you do with her.

    ~Berta
     
  8. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife Well-Known Member

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    Actually, we are pretty sure that she is an Ossabaw Island Hog. She came from a litter at a living history farm. Their breeding stock came from Mt. Vernon.

    Sorta complicates matters, hm? :no: :haha:
     
  9. Rouen

    Rouen Well-Known Member

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    is it possible for you to get another hog to raise as a feeder and maybe sometime down the road try to find a Ossabaw boar? just a thought :rolleyes: