help! submissive pee-er . . .

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by SherryR, Sep 14, 2006.

  1. SherryR

    SherryR Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I've a sweet pup about 6 mos old, a standard poodle female who's submissive pee-er. AArrrrggghhh!! What to do? I try making her sit whenever I think there might be a situation where there will be inadvertant, or excited or submissive peeing, but I can't always do it in the nick of time. Does this go away, please? She dribbles when she sees the other dogs, dribbles when she sees my kids, my husband, anyone who greets her, etc. I've told my kids dont talk in a high, excited voice, but sometiimes they forget or dont care, or whatever. Does anyone have any training tips? Do I keep her on a leash even in the house when we first enter? How do I distract her from that? What about the car, if we pick someone up somewhere else? (I use plastic on seat) Please tell me your ideas or advice.
    Sherry
     
  2. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does she understand her role within the family? Sometimes using a NILIF program (Nothing In Life Is Free) helps a timid dog. This is where you never give her a treat unless she has earned it. Have her sit or down or high five or something before you let her have dinner. Have her sit at the door before opening it for her. Do not allow her on furniture or beds (confuses her as to her rank). You may have to keep the bedroom doors closed and turn the cushions up on the furniture if you've already allowed her these priviledges. Since you have kids, this will be more difficult than it appears. If the kids let her on the furniture and their beds, she will need to spend time in the crate when you aren't there to supervise.

    Having her sit for you is certainly the best way to handle submissive urination when she greets you. Being on a washable surface is less frustrating Something else you can do is completely ignore her when she greets you. Do not speak to her, do not bend over her. Once she sits (even if she pees first) wait a couple of seconds, then look at her, and without bending over her (bend knees if you have to get down lower), scratch her under the chin and in a soft voice, praise. Then stand up and go about your business. Keep everything low key. Wait until she settles down before playing with her or petting her or letting her outside. Everyone in the family needs to do this. Rehearse several times so you can praise the children when the do the right thing.
     

  3. SherryR

    SherryR Well-Known Member

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    thank you Maura,
    no she doesn't get on furniture . . . when she goes to carpet area, it is usually after kids are in bed and she's with me. Thanks for pointing out about bending over her . . . I bet that has something to do with it. I've read the nilif stuff, at least some, and have tried to incorporate some of it into our routines.

    We'll work on it with your advice.
    Sherry
     
  4. wendle

    wendle Well-Known Member

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    I used to have a submissive pee-er and this is what worked for me.
    First I didn't correct her for it because that would make things worse.
    I wouldn't let her sit but put my hand under her belly to make her stand while she was being greeted. Make greetings very brief not goo gooing. I also would try to make greetings outside if possible. For my dog's first year I would let her outside to greet my neices, she just went crazy for them. My dog got better about it then outgrew it. You will have to train your family too. You might even try a distraction for greeting like an invitation to play ball.
     
  5. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    Our female did that for about a year. Espiecially when hubby first comes in from work. He love's that dog and I don't believe has even had to correct her, she's been easy to train and I am the one who corrects her what little she needed as a pup.

    Hubby was upset thought for some reason she was afraid of him. She finally has stopped that can't think of a time in the last eight months or so she has done that.

    I did try to have her in the yard or kennel when hubby came home, just to save my floors.
     
  6. SherryR

    SherryR Well-Known Member

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    Yes, my pup 'dribbles' on the porch or on grass, and also kitchen floor. I have instructed everyone to ignore her and the ball playing is a good idea, instead of 'goo goo' stuff my kid does with her when she greets her.
    Thanks for your input! Happy to know she'll outgrow it.
    Sherry
     
  7. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Sherry, do you have cable or satellite TV?

    There's a really fabulous TV show called "The Dog Whisperer" that teaches dog pack psychology. One (that I saw) of the episodes dealt with curing an overly submissive and easily frightened dog (though not a pee-er). You can get it on DVD at WalMart/SamsClub and probably other places too. The guy who does the show is named Cesar Milan. The show is on the National Geographic Channel (NGC).

    Here's his website. http://www.dogpsychologycenter.com/

    This show is really excellent for dealing with any kind of animal that lives in packs, flocks, or herds. I recommend it to everyone who loves animals.

    Don't try it on cats though--they don't "get" hierarchy the same way as pack animals do.
     
  8. SherryR

    SherryR Well-Known Member

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    thanks Suburbanite, I love him! I used to watch him, but either he's not on that channel anymore, or he's been switched to another cable channel or time. I will look for his dvd, and read his website. I get a kick out of him. I read that he came here with absolutely nothing in his pockets and after a few years, became 'somebody' because of his understanding of dogs.
    Sherry
     
  9. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    She will eventually outgrow the behavior. You are right not to make a fuss.
     
  10. Cloverbud

    Cloverbud Well-Known Member

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    wvpeach, your hubby should take the piddle as a compliment! :) She's acknowledging him as dominant and supreme over her. :bow: