Help Starting Seeds

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Diana/KY, Apr 4, 2005.

  1. Diana/KY

    Diana/KY Well-Known Member

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    I've always wanted to start seeds indoors and get things started for an early garden. Trouble is....I live in a very small house. There's absolutely no room to put flats of seeds. Is there any way I could get an early start by doing this outdoors? Can I make a kind of mini greenhouse and put the flats of seeds inside this to keep them warm? Is it too early to do this here in Kentucky? The seeds I want to start are hard shell gourds, Poppys and Black eyed Susans. I'm also looking for instructions in building a mini greenhouse. Has to be real easy as I'm doing it myself. Thanks for any help, Diana
     
  2. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I have been known to wrap a dog crate in clear plastic...

    If you do make some type of mini greenhouse, make sure it has venting, and that you can remove some of the plastic on hot days.

    They also have them for sale. Lee Valley tools has a couple different sizes of mini greenhouses.
     

  3. Hacker

    Hacker New Member

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    A small, simple greenhouse will get as cold on the inside as it is on the outside, at night. On a sunny day, even if a cool day, it will get hot enough to kill the plants. Even if you manage to keep your plants alive by venting and heating the greenhouse, it's a pain with likely poor results.

    Add a southern sunspace or a simple bay window to the south side of your house. This way, your greenhouse will enjoy the climate control of your home. And, it will be very easy access.
     
  4. bonnie lass

    bonnie lass Semper Fi

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    Poppies do not like to be transplanted, they should be planted where you want them to grow. Black eyed Susans are so easy to grow that it may not be necessary to start them inside. They are all over my yard with no help at all from me. I have no experience with the gourds, but surely you can find space for one little pot :)
     
  5. Diana/KY

    Diana/KY Well-Known Member

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    The gourds seeds are the main ones I'd like to get a head start on. They need long growing season and I want lots of them and bigs ones too. I've heard that gourds don't like being transplanted either. The best way to go about it would be to leave the starts in their little pots and cut the bottom out of it and set it in the ground. I think I'll just sow the poppy and black eyed susans like Bonnie Lass has recommended and chuck the mini greenhouse idea. I've been searching the web and from what I've found and from replies here, I've decided I don't want to chance losing my seedlings to heat or cold. I have a teenage son that's never home, nice sunny bedroom window...hmmmm :) Thanks for the suggestions.
     
  6. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    DH made me a mini-greenhouse using shelving from Ikea. If you're of a mind to, you could take an old bookcase, hang flourescent fixtures in it, and voila! Instant greenhouse! (Of course, you'd have to go through your books and either box them for the duration or donate what you don't want to the local library...)

    Good luck!

    Pony!
     
  7. edcopp

    edcopp Well-Known Member

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    Headstart for gords. What I do is take a 2 ltr. soft drink bottle. The clear ones work best. Cut the bottom off of it, so that you have a bottle that looks like it did before, but is an inch or two shorted because of cutting the bottom off. Now get your location ready where the gords are going to grow. Plant two or three seeds real close together, in a space that is not as big as the bottom of the soft drink bottle. Then take the bottle with no bottom and place it over the seeds. Then press the bottle into the soil an inch or so and you have an instant greenhouse. I usually keep the lid and leave it nearby. If there should be a real heavy frost then I put the lid on to hold in heat. This should not take the place of a greenhouse because there is no heat source except the sun, but it will give you a little bit of a headstart. I have several out now, starting various things. I will pick the bottles up after the danger of frost is passed.