Help scraping textured paint off walls

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by prhamell, Jan 3, 2004.

  1. prhamell

    prhamell Well-Known Member

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    We have a house close to 100 yrs old which was "re-done" in the '70's. It's taken a lot of digging to find original doors, window frames, wood floors, etc. Our upstairs stairway and hallway walls and ceiling is covered with that bumpy textured paint. Dh has scraped and sanded a little bit off but realized it is very tedious and DUSTY work. Very intimidating job to tackle. Anyone have any ideas on how to get it off? Most of the rest of the house is plaster so most likely the walls in the hallway are too. Thanks for any advice. This is our winter progect and by next spring I would love to see fairly smooth walls painted with soft butter yellow. Becky
     
  2. dale

    dale Well-Known Member

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    Ive used a random orbital sander. you can get one that will hook up to a shop vacum and it will cut down on the dust. Or you can dampen it then scrap it


    dale
     

  3. Lady TS

    Lady TS Well-Known Member

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    We too are in the process of (slowly) redoing the old family farmhouse in which we live. We have run into the issue of lead paint. The kids have elevated levels of lead in their blood.....we are having to get them tested every 3 months. In fact, I need to bring them in this month for another test and I hope it's down to about zero this time...so if you have young kids around, take precautions!

    ANYWAY, you don't know what is under the 70s textured paint-it might be lead based paint. When you remove it, wet it down so you/others aren't breathing in lead dust. Also, wear a mask that is advertized that it keeps lead out. I know it sounds ridiculous, but I'd rather feel silly wearing a mask and feel like I'm overdoing it when I'm cleaning up with mops(use TSP/water solution to clean with and then mop with clear water) than deal with lead poisoning.

    There are few if any outward signs/symptoms of lead poisoning.

    Just my two cents. Hope it helps!
     
  4. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Having lived in my share of really old houses....

    No matter how yucky something on the walls is, whatever is underneath it is liable to be worse!!!! They covered it up for a reason!

    I would suspect that you will find plaster in bad shape under there, cracks, etc. It might be easier, cheaper in the long run to simply have the walls re-surfaced with plaster, right over the top of that stuff.

    Just a thought.

    Jena
     
  5. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Put drywall over the old stuff. I'm in the process of covering an ols house that was done by a cake decorator I kid you not. It will look like a new home when complete.


    mikell
     
  6. LiL OHNNL

    LiL OHNNL Well-Known Member

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    The best way to do a project like this is to skim coat the walls with joint compound. First use a good undercoat primer, when its dry just skim coat the wall with the compound mixed with plaster to make the dry time faster it may take two or three coats to get it smooth with sanding in between and sanding the final caot or by using a damp sponge to sooth it out as best you can and then sanding to get it smooth . Its a lot easer said then done but will make the walls look like new and cheaper then drywall.
    Good luck,
    john
     
  7. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    I second the skim coat. It's a job to hire out though. Any competent drywaller could do it in short order. DON'T sand it; you'll find dust in your underwear drawer three years from now. :haha: I don't know how deep the texture is, but you can also buy a special wallpaper (it looks like plain paper-no pattern or gloss) that's used to cover old plaster or wallpaper; we've used it to help rehab two old farmhouses. You can buy it at Home Depot and it's cheap and easy to work with.
     
  8. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    The house I'm working is too thich to skim coat. Sometimes we use a texture gun to put the mud on then a 24" knife to smooth it. I don't do it so well. I have a drywall guy to make things beautiful for me.

    mikell
     
  9. prhamell

    prhamell Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the helpful ideas. I like the skim coat ideas. Sure beats taking all the junk off the walls. The plaster in the house isn't smooth to begin with and we like that look so sanding won't be an issue. And if I can avoid cleaning up dust for months, I'm happy. We've been watching for lead paint and asbestos here too. Mostly the place was just covered with yucky wallpaper so we haven't had to do a lot with scraping paint. My youngest (2) tested a little bit over normal for lead, but nothing to become overly worried about. And I know where she's picking that up from...the enclosed porches where now she's not allowed to go. Becky
     
  10. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Take a wide drywall trowel and scrape the high spots off before the skim coat. It may not work if you have paper under the paint. the moisture may losten the paper. catch 22..


    mikell