Help--Questions about homesteading

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by redron, May 7, 2005.

  1. redron

    redron Member

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    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    utah
    I have my eye on some cheap property in Utah. It has a fixer upper house, well, septic system and outbuildings. The land is a little hilly, but does have some fairly level areas.
    I haven't seen any fruit trees in the area and was told that you can't garden in the area. Elevation is around 6000. It goes below freezing in the winter and gets up to about 88 in the summer.
    I don't see why I couldn't grow some fruit trees or garden. I know that not all fruit trees would grow in this area.
    I also want to have some animals on the property. I have checkens already. Any suggestions on what else would do well in that kind of environment? I was thinking beef cattle or sheep. Goats????
    The land hasn't been used in over 4 years. It is currently overgrown in grass. It does get a fair amount of moisture on it in the form of snow and rain.
    Please help me--tell me what you think that I could grow or raise on it. My husband doesn't think that I can grow anything on it. Lets prove him wrong. LOL LOL :confused:
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Location:
    SE Missouri
    Of course you can garden there!! You will need to do things to extend the season of course, but there are lots of things you can grow. (BTW, what part of Utah?)

    Any of the cole crops, lettuce, spinach, english or snow peas, carrots, radish, beet, asparagus, potatoes, all these and other cool weather crops will grow just fine. With a little extra work you can grow things like peppers, tomatos and squash. I have ripened cantaloupes and watermelons at 5500 ft in an area that normally had 60 or fewer frost free days. If you have a small greenhouse or some good cold frames you will have it made. Wine grapes also will do ok since they tolerate colder weather. There are also some new varieties of fruit trees developed in places like MN and Canada for colder areas.

    Nearly everywhere I've lived people have told me it was hard or impossible to grow things, but I did anyway. LOL
     

  3. Mudwoman

    Mudwoman Well-Known Member

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    Dec 18, 2002
    In Utah, you better be careful. You have to buy your water rights there and water is sold in acre feet and it isnt' cheap. You can't even have a well on your own property unless you buy the right from whoever way back when bought the water rights. My SIL and BIL live in Eagle Pass, which is just outside Lehi, Utah and my BIL makes a living selling water rights. They have 7 acres and could only buy enough acre feet of water to be able to water 1/2 acre of their 7 acres. They had horses for a while, but couldn't get enough water to support their care and they don't have horses anymore. If this place hasn't been used in 4 years and is cheap, that should tell you something----------you need more information.
     
  4. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Do you live on the property now? If not look in southeast AZ as property is cheap and there is water. We are at 4400 ft and grow all kinds of vegies, have fruit trees, chickens, goats and a lamb. Winters get down to 8 and summers up to about 108 but cool at night. If you get goats, make sure you get at least two. If you can butcher, rabbits are good and pigs too.
     
  5. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    My sister livid in the Colorado mountains for a while, and she could get frost in the summer.

    She raised cole veggies for her table, and peas, and had an apple tree that produced. People in her area often tried sweet corn but rarley suceeded in getting it ripe.

    My parents in CAlifornia have an oragnge tree where it is supposedly too cold for oranges. It does well for them because it is on the south side of the house. The lack of wind gives it enough protection for it to bear.
     
  6. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just love to be told something can't be done...and prove the nay sayers wrong!
    Lessee, one problem could be frost- cold frames could help- water- sunken trenches and soil amendments could help- what about minerals in the water? Many areas in the west under aquifer irrigation have built up salt, alkali or arsenic levels in the soil to toxicity. I would defintly check that out.

    Rabbits could utilize your grownover grasses/shrubberies, as could goats. Any chance of researching native plants? I know that there is a small farmer in the SE raising nopales for the ethnic markets and rolling in dough!
     
  7. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    go over to the Backwoods home forum backwoodshome.com and seek out "aunt jenny" because she homesteads in a small town in Utah and has lots of relatives there as well....she raises animals, a garden, herbs, and more....she probably could answer a lot of your questions or steer you to somebody who can....
     
  8. redron

    redron Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    utah
    Thanks so much for all of your input, but someone else beat me to the punch. They made an offer before I could. It already had a well and irrigation rights. I am still so bummed about it. It had 9-10 acres, a fixer upper house and lots of outbuildings. I don't think I will be able to find something that good for $30k again. But I am looking again. Again thanks for your support.
    Veronica :)