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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had this happen last year but it was after I harvested the biggest part of them. This year it is starting right after I picked just a few tomatoes, they started doing it.

I have read several threads on here about using egg shells and powered milk but I can't find them.
I started saving egg shells as soon as I read about this. I had a few plastic containers with lids on them and when one got full I put them into the blender with water and then drained off the water and watered the plants with the water and have maybe 4 or 5 cups of ground up shells but I have about 20 or 30 tomato plants and they are all starting to do the same thing.
I saw where someone or maybe more of you were planting them with powered milk and / or the shells.

I put shells and a half cup of milk in the holes for the second batch of plants, but not this batch.

This is the biggest prettiest bunch of plants I ever had, and with all the problems I have had this year with the deer, groundhogs, and rabbits, I was really hoping to get something from them.

What can I put down that is really fast acting. I probably have 1 to 2,000 tomatoes out there that are from a marble size all the way up to softballs.

And why won't they turn red. They are getting big, big big big, and the only way I am getting a good tomato is to pick it and put it on the hand rail. And even then, they aren'y vine rippened. And you can tell. Almost like store bought.

It is too late to go to the feed store and they are dum as the socks they wear any way.
I have 2 boxes of powered milk I can either spread or mix with water and feed them. I am just worried about insects if I do that.

I hope some one here can tell me what to do.
Thanks ahead
Dennis
 

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You might try some liquid Calcium floiar spray, but it may be too late. At least start spraying the younger tomatoes, especially the flowers. Give the top & undersides of the leaves a generous spraying late in the afternoon or evening. You can usually get liquid Calcium supplement at the feed store. It might be too late to put it in the soil. I have found that some varieties are prone to blosom end rot, so try a different kind next year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
swampgirl says calcium floriar spray, and then swamp man comes in with calcium nitrate. I expect that either of them will probably work as well, but what was funny is swampgirl is form Louisiana, and just a short distance away is swamp man in Mississippi. I just thought that was funny. Thanks for the info.
I don't have either of them here and can't get any until Monday, but since Ravenlost is from, where else, Ms., says to use some epson salt which I do have so I will start there.
Gulf coast must be kicking today, LOL.
Thanks again.
Dennis.
 

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crafty2002 said:
swampgirl says calcium floriar spray, and then swamp man comes in with calcium nitrate. I expect that either of them will probably work as well,
Yep, all of the cures suggested here, and about 2 or 3 hundred others, will all work equally well. The civilized world as we know it has been searching for a cure for blossom end rot for 500 years. For all we know, the Aztecs may have worked on finding a solution for 1,000 years previous. To date, there has been little success!

Martin
 

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I've NEVER had blossom end rot, I use Gardens Alive fertilizer on the hole, some compost',epsom salts and egg shells' and like I said, I've NEVER had it---till this year! A few tomatoes have had to be pitched because of this. Best thing I can tell you is what Ruth Stout says--"some years they just do that".
 

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Blossom end rot is most often caused by an irregular watering scheme, i.e. the plants have not been watered for some time, then over-watered, then left without water again for too long. Keeping the soil moist, (but not too much so), and thickly mulched, will help prevent that problem. The watering can be increased as the plant begins to fruit heavily, but once again, not too much.

As for tomatoes going red: tomatoes do not actually require sunlight to ripen; in fact, at a certain point, kept in the sun, they start to lose their vitamin C content.
If the tomatoes are picked when there is a light pink flush at their bases, and then kept in a warm place, out of direct sunlight, they will ripen with a more intense flavour.
I know, I know .... it's not what we've always believed to be true, but it's a fact.
 

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I usually use crushed oyster shell on my tomatoes. Never had blossom end rot. Last summer I didn't get time to add the oyster shell. What the groundhog didn't get developed rot. And yes the plants got watered, lots of water on a regular basis, I watered my containers only twice last year because it rained so much. The potted tomatoes which did get the oyster shell and milk jug rinse water didn't get rot. So, in my experience, watering has had little to do with end rot. The calcium makes a world of difference, but not all soil is the same, so others might not be able to prevent end rot by using calcium.
 

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CRAFTY2002

I am having the same problem. I have never had a problem growing tomatoes before. But they are all growing well..they are huge...only 1 with blossom end rot which I tossed out. But the tomatoes are huge on the vines...and they WON"T TURN RED...*POUT* WHY???? :Bawling: I wanted to harvest them..so I can make Pasta Sauce, Marinaria and Salsa etc before my surgery on the 25th. What can I do... :help:


And why won't they turn red. They are getting big, big big big,
 

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Till then I am going to use store bought tomatoes for canning and eating...*sigh* on the other hand..my other veggies are doing great..harvesting and canning so much...I have over 60 Jars of pickles..."PICKLES Anyone???"

Blessings
 

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Thanks for the info Baronsmom....
 

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Messianic4 said:
And why won't they turn red. They are getting big, big big big,
You're in Indiana and worried about no ripe tomatoes on 9 July? Assuming that you would have planted them out about 15 May, it hasn't even been 60 days. Check the days to maturity of the varieties planted. Unless you planted something in the 45-50 day range, you wouldn't have much ripe fruit yet and they would be small-fruited varieties. Since you obviously planted varieties which produce large fruit, they won't ripen until it's the proper time for them to do so.

As for the blossom end rot, every creditable site that you find will effectively state the same thing. That is, it can only be prevented but NOT cured.

Martin
 

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Paquebot said:
You're in Indiana and worried about no ripe tomatoes on 9 July? Assuming that you would have planted them out about 15 May, it hasn't even been 60 days. Check the days to maturity of the varieties planted. Unless you planted something in the 45-50 day range, you wouldn't have much ripe fruit yet and they would be small-fruited varieties. Since you obviously planted varieties which produce large fruit, they won't ripen until it's the proper time for them to do so.

As for the blossom end rot, every creditable site that you find will effectively state the same thing. That is, it can only be prevented but NOT cured.

Martin

Martin

Thanks for the response. I planted my tomatoes April 9th. I planted them in flats indoors, when it warmed up enough I transfered them to the greenhouse...then I planted them in the garden in May..around the 25th ...So for the most part they are over 60 days. Or I may be confused. I know I had to restart some..but I am sure that I planted them in April. I have pics of them in the garden on May 25th and they were over a foot tall then. Right now some of the plants are over 5 feet tall. Like I said I have loads of green tomatoes. But none are red except my tomato sugary's.

*Confused* :shrug:

Helana
 

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The counting off of days to maturity began when you set those plants into the ground in the garden. Time spent in the flats doesn't count. In your case, only 45 days have officially passed in determining when you should get the first ripe fruit from any given variety.

Martin
 

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I thought Days to Harvest started when you planted the seed? So do you add the days to germinate..to the days to harvest? Ok so if my plants are 55-60 days to harvest..then they shoudl be ready in another 10 to 15 days....and the other ones that are 90 days to harvest...they have another 45 days? Am I understanding this right...*this is making my head spin...LOL*
 

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Ok...I found my garden plot map...I planted the tomatoes in the garden on the 29-30 of April. they are beefsteak and Crimson Cushion Beefsteak. Also one is a Yellow Boy and one is a Tomato surgary. My head is not on straight...I would be lost without my maps, lists and so on. So I count from the 30th of April then?
 
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