Help, my grapevine it's been attack by outer space living organisms.

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ralphy, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. Ralphy

    Ralphy Member

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    Aug 12, 2002
    :worship: Please I need help, my grapevine it's sick, but the sickness it's out of this world, the Vine has a perfect look, green,lushy, and it seems like a perfect picture for a garden mag. Now during the summer, I get these balls like growth mainly in the leaves, they are a green ball, hard, and if you cut them you could get a colorless fluid out, so far nothing seems to bother them, but to cut the affected leave and destroy it, far away, I never saw anything like that. Do you guys have some suggestions? I need Help !!!!!
     
  2. lyteora

    lyteora Well-Known Member

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    va
    some insects will lay their eggs in leaves, some make spikey things on the top of the leaves, some make galls, which are larger and round some are big bumps. Is this affecting the plant in a bad way or does it just look funny?
     

  3. stuckinsd

    stuckinsd Well-Known Member

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    South Dakota
  4. lyteora

    lyteora Well-Known Member

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    Mar 30, 2004
    Location:
    va
    "Galls are abnormal growths on plants caused by living organisms, including bacteria, fungi, nematodes, mites, and insects. There are hundreds of kinds of galls, each characteristic of the organism that stimulates its growth. These organisms use the galls for food and protection. Plants produce galls to restrict injury caused by the pest, placing a barrier between the pest and the rest of the plant. Because galls stay put, they are highly visible to other organisms. Some insects colonize galls to share the home made by the gall maker. other insects penetrate galls to feed on the gall maker itself. Galls located on above ground parts of a tree seldom, if ever, kill the tree. Chemical control: Insects and mites that cause galls are well protected beneath the swollen plant tissue for most of their lives. Because of this, is is very difficult to time insecticide applications to coincide with the brief periods when they are effective against these pests. Biological control: When removing galls from infested trees, it is good to remember that many of their natural enemies live in the galls. Physically removing every last gall from trees will also remove natural enemies. Removal of fallen leaves with old galls can simply reduce numbers of natural enemies without reducing numbers of gall-forming insects that can attack the tree." [Plant Health Care for woody ornamentals A professional's guide to preventing and managing environmental stresses and pests] I dont know if this helps I know its mainly talking about trees not grapes but I'm sure its all related. Hope it helps Lyte
     
  5. It just looks funny, but I don't know if I let it go will get really bad.