Help me with my runaway Border collie

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by Marilyn in CO, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. Marilyn in CO

    Marilyn in CO Well-Known Member

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    I am so angry at this dog and need help to figure what to do. We have had Border Collies over the years but this is a new problem. Male (unneutered) 3 years old and he was just fine until a couple months ago when he started taking off for parts unknown and not returning for a couple days. Ok, I know he probably went off to find a girlfriend and we will nueter him very soon, but I have a feeling that won't stop him. He used to be interested in the cattle but now all he can think about is running away. The minute we let him out of the fence he runs like crazy and doesn't stop. He is a sweet, gentle dog, great with kids and we have had him since a puppy. We live in country on a large farm and neighbors aren't very close. Will a boundary shock collar work?or any other suggestions would be great. We have had many intact male dogs that never left our farm, never had a problem like this before.
     
  2. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    hmmm i dont know what will work with a border collie but i am sure sorry you are having these problems with your 4 footed friend!
     

  3. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    The "invisible" fence may work, may not. Depends on how badly he wants to run. If he wants it bad enough he'll learn that to get what he wants he has to endure a little discomfort. Some dogs are really soft (like my goldens) and some dogs don't care (like my DB's GSD). It's too bad he wasn't neutered younger, the running off might have started as looking for girlfriends but now is probably more of a habit. You could keep him on a long leash or a manual shock collar and correct him everytime he tries to take off (obviously he could only be out when someone was watching him then). Good luck.
     
  4. cricket

    cricket Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend that had to get a calf shocker to stop her bassett from running. He was only allowed out with his harness and he knew the difference if the fence was off. Regular invisible fences never fazed him...he'd just grin and keep going. The calf harness literally flipped him over with the shock but he didn't run after that.
     
  5. Bresias

    Bresias Restless User

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    To keep your dog safe, it doesn't seem so "mean" to shock them good a few times, like swatting your child's butt for running into the street.
     
  6. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    Is it possible that your border collie has gone over to "the other side?"

    What I mean is that herding is a modified hunting/prey instinct. Many times collies that take to running off, are actually running other people's livestock, with intent to harm. Often these dogs will NOT do this on their own place.

    And it's very well known among the farm and sheep people here in England. I hope that is not the case with your collie~he sounds like a lovely dog in every other respect.

    But if he HAS taken to chasing livestock, there are two or three things you can do.

    1. Keep him fenced or tied at all times.
    2. Find him a nice home in the suburbs with a fenced yard.
    3. Have him put down.

    I think a dog that won't stay home is not worth having. After all, he's not there!
     
  7. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    I too have seen what Hanna is talking about with a neighbor's border collie who started running and killing someone's chickens and sheep. I'm afraid her options are pretty realistic. I can't think of any others.
     
  8. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i was gonna say:

    1. neuter
    2. fence

    problem solved.

    but i see HSH has beat me to it. :nerd:
     
  9. Marilyn in CO

    Marilyn in CO Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone, I do think he has "gone to the other side", around here we call it "gone worthless", or a "tramp". I just never had a family pet do this, but I can see all his herding instincts are gone haywire......so he is gonna be a fenced yard pet and beyond that on a leash. A big pain in the behind but he is such a sweetie and he is my baby. It's time for snip snip. :)
     
  10. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When you start keeping him as a yard pet, consider also working him in some obedience line. Agility (I'm sure he'd be great), obedience, rally-o, tracking. Anything. If you don't you may end up with more problems, like barking, digging, etc. Besides, you'll have fun
     
  11. mountainman_bc

    mountainman_bc Well-Known Member

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    Agility...exactly. These guys are workers not pets, he's going to need work to keep him mentally fit. Otherwise they lick their paws, dig, bark excessivly. Get him neutered (always get the dog neutered as a pup- no excuses) then get him into agility or become religious about the frisbee, etc. Fenced, of course.
     
  12. Jotun

    Jotun Well-Known Member

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    I have never in my life seen a dog that "went to the other side" go after assumed game singlemindedly but I don't know everything or every dog. As I told my wife earlier this evening " I have years of experience with dogs and I learn something new every time I meet one." Anyone who tells you different isn't paying attention. My first thaught would be that maybe someone nearby has many bitches, so many maybe that one is generally in heat. Unfixed males that are "packing" as it's put will generally get that female no matter what. Dogs will singlemindedly go after "game" if they can see it or know it is in the immediate vicinity. I have BC's and they are intense but I wouldn't assume one to hunt for days singlemindedly. Either way you will do well with a fence.
     
  13. savinggrace

    savinggrace COO of manure management

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    We have been having such a time with our English Shepherd male, himself coming into sexual maturity; with continually chasing down my one child and attempting improper acts; and climbing the fence to chase passers by. I invested in a simple shock collar system with adjustable intensities. It was approx. $100.00 and money certainly well spent. We have cured the first behavioral issue with two 'sessions' and are well on our way to reminding him fences are not for climbing, semis are not for chasing!

    Again, it comes down to a safety issue; he's a bright dog but should not be dodging cars; and the other issue, well that's just inappropriate.

    My best,

    Melissa
     
  14. Willowynd

    Willowynd Well-Known Member

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    I agree. When I have had a male run off by himself, it has awalys been after a female dog in season. I have also had visits from neighbors dogs miles away because I had a girl in season. One Golden even ripped out one of my screens trying to get after one (my girls in season are always kept in the house crated). Fortunately the window was only cracked and locked in that position and I heared him before he could do more damage. The upside is I got to meet neighbors never would have met, the downside is the damage and always having to be very watchful when girls are coming in. Now one time 2 of my dogs ran off (male and female) when one of my boys thought they would be fine by themselves going potty while he used the bathroom as they are well trained. I found them 2 doors down herding the neighbors cows 15 mins later. Yes, they were herding and not attacking. There is no substitute for good fences and supervision when not contained. I have no faith in invisible fences as too many dogs from "invisible fence" homes have graced my property and the highway, one was the golden that tried to break in.
     
  15. frogmammy

    frogmammy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    savinggrace, concerning your English Shepherd and the attempted "improper acts" with one child...is it possible that child is prone to low-level bladder/kidney infections? Dogs often pick up on something like that.

    Mon