Help me identify a wild berry.....

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by affenpinschermom, Jul 13, 2006.

  1. affenpinschermom

    affenpinschermom Well-Known Member

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    We encountered something similar when we moved to ky. The locals call them wine berries. They are sweet. If you live in the north, they sound like thimbleberries. Thimbleberries are very tart, almost bitter. Hope this helps
     
  2. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    ask over in plant id forum maybe they can help
    it belongs over there anyway
     

  3. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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  4. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    Loganberries? What a nice find if they are.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. mandyh

    mandyh Well-Known Member

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    Do you have photo's?
     
  6. Lynne

    Lynne Well-Known Member

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  7. naturelover

    naturelover Well-Known Member

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    They might be salmonberries. It might be easier to identify your berries if you can describe the shapes and shade of green of the leaves rather than the berries. There are lots of berries that look like raspberries but that have different leaves and plant structure. Does the plant have hairs, prickles or tiny thorns on either the leaves or stems, or are they bare? Are there any flowers remaining on the plants, and if so, what color are they? You could try googling images of salmonberries, loganberries, raspberries, blackberries (some forms of thornless blackberries are red, not black). Also, it is dependent on what part of the country you live in. You could google for descriptions and images of berries that are indigenous to your locality.
     
  8. Bear

    Bear Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like wineberries to me, when you pick them the center is left on the stem, translucent, and sticky to the touch. Do they have a reddish colored canes? We have tons of them growing wild in PA.
     
  9. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i too live in pa and have wine berries locally. i was trying to find more info on them during a chat on a post here about a month ago. i thought they were thimbleberries as i could not find anything at all about wine berries on the net.

    thanks for the link lynne. :)

    i don't really care for the wine berries for eating. they seem "sickening sweet" to me. :shrug:
     
  10. PonderosaQ

    PonderosaQ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for all your ideas. I believe Lynne has hit it right when she suggested wineberries. The pictures she referred me to looked perfect. I'll go over tomorrow and make note of those points you kind folks guided me to re: info on stem, leaves etc and not just the berries. You were all really helpful thanks so much. I searched the net and couldn't find it but as always this forum's folks "know all".
    PQ
     
  11. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

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    We have wine berries here in CT too. My Mom has a patch of them in her yard that she uses sort of like raspberries. They are so good!
     
  12. Deb&Al

    Deb&Al Well-Known Member

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    this is a great informative thraed. we have these wineberries growing and i've been picking them, thinking they were a wild rasberry.

    so, they are edible? i was going to freeze some for use during the winter.

    deb