Help me build my fence!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by CountryMamaof5, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. CountryMamaof5

    CountryMamaof5 Well-Known Member

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    My property is not flat by any means. The front part probably has a mound that goes up about 10 feet at the highest point and kind of plateaus up there. for about 50 feet . The West property line after you come down from the slope is relatively smooth (less than 3 inch change) but there is a lot of little poplar and pines along the way plus an old brush pile with stumps and those little yellow jacket type wasps.. My south property line is 230' wide and is relatively smooth so its doable. Then my east property line has 2 pines (foot in diameter) about 75% on our side of the property but still has part on the land for sale next to us. Do we cut the tree down or move the fence around it? A few places it sudden dips so I would assume I need to fill in the area?

    Does the fence go on my side of the T Post or on the outside? The T Posts are right on the property line.

    Do we avoid fencing in the higher plateau area in the front part of the property? We dont use that part of the property at all at this time. It has some really tall red pines and then some brush. We could fence it in until we hit the ditch.

    Maybe I could take some pictures of it tomorrow. I got 20 T-Posts to start. I am going to get the T-posts all in first before buying the fencing. I need about 130 T-Posts I believe. We are going to run a cattle woven wire I do believe. Lowes has them for 127 for 330 feet rolls. Mostly I just want to keep our animals in if they escape, (ducks free range and i dont want them leaving the yard anymore) and run a line of wire for an electric charge as well.

    Or would you just use a few strands of hot wire around the yard and forget the woven wire? The dimensions of the yard is 395 deep 230 feet wide i believe. Maybe 3 strands of it. I would get the White tape/ribbon for sight reasons.
     
  2. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    I am just learning to fence myself, and I am not sure if I have a clear sense of your layout, but here's some feedback:

    1. If you set back your fence from the north line, can you avoid the mound altogether? If so, that is what i would probably try (depending on how much space you lose).

    2. You don't say if the 75% of the pines you mention is branches or trunk. If the trunk is straddling the property line, I would bend the fence around it and talk to whoever buys the property eventually. Why cut them down unless you have to?

    3. In other posts on fencing, I have seen HT veterans recommend a woven wire fence for the perimeter, with a strand of electric just inside it. If the power fails, the woven will still keep the animals in. I am sure someone more experienced will comment on this though...

    4. for your dips, if they are wide enough, maybe you could set a t-post in the middle of the depression and have the wire follow the contour of the ground? If not, then I would bet you have to fill them with something. And if your animals are pigs, sheep, or goats, I would guess it would have to be something substantial.

    Hope you get more expert advice than mine... good luck.
     

  3. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    The wire goes on the inside, the side of the post your land is on. I've built alot of fence in my 61 years. :cowboy:
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The wire goes to the inside.

    I'd go with woven wire & one elctric wire as you mention. But mant different things work.

    Make your corners strong. Braced.

    Shared trees can be an issue. I would bend the wire around the tree. Both of you own the trees, tho likely you control it by owning over 50%. If the trees bother you, get them down _now_, before property is sold & new neighbors raise a stink about you cutting down 'their' trees. Be sure they are your trees legally tho.

    Sounds like you should just run the fence & wire, woven does move up & down hill fairly well. You may need a stronger post at the top edges & bottom middle of any dips. I would fence it all, as you do not have much to start with.

    Now for the nitty gritty:

    Fence laws vary by state, but many have very specific laws about it. Livestock fences on the line can, by default, become shared fences, and there are rules governing who pays for which 1/2 of the fence. While you are building your fence & you will pay for all of it - and that is the proper way of things.... Be aware of what the laws are should a neighbor get different ideas or try to use your fence to keep their livestock in. It is _real_ wise to know the law ahead of time.

    In some more crowded areas, there are required setbacks for fences from the property line. I will hope you are not in such an area.

    You said earlier you have a road past your house. Find out what the setback is from the middle of the road for fences - it can be more than just the easement. Most counties/ townships have required setbacks for buildings & fences these days. Would be a shame to have to pull up your fence line & move it after the fact.

    --->Paul
     
  5. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    Check Out The Hi Tensile Fence For Cost And Ease Of Installation Jay.
     
  6. CountryMamaof5

    CountryMamaof5 Well-Known Member

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    Where do I find out setbacks? Do I need to contact township supervisor?
     
  7. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Some research you can do on-line, many counties have info online. But the township supervisor should be a good place to find out.

    --->Paul
     
  8. jlo

    jlo Active Member

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    You can usually put a fence right on your property line (no setback) as long as you're not on the road. If you're fencing road frontage, it will partly depend on the type of fencing--farm fencing is see-through so it shouldn't be an issue, but you'll want it behind the Right-Of-Way line of the road so that if they do road/shoulder improvements, they don't just take it down.

    We use woven wire perimeter fencing and then hot lines interior--one about nose height inside the woven for "lean-guard" and then for subdivisions. The woven works for more than one species without modifications. Our cows would only need 2-3 high tensile hot lines, our sheep would need 5-7. Even the woven wire doesn't keep our bantam free range chickens in--but it does mostly work for the full size chickens. You want your wire on the side with the animals so that if/when they lean on it/push on it they are pushing into the resistance of your posts, not pushing away from your posts (I can't believe how often I see this backwards!).