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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

Just added this fellow to our family. I have 10 years exp. with animals, including veterinary experience but not very familiar with goats. I was wondering if someone might help me identify him by breed. I'm leaning towards pygmy, but he seems a tad bit large, and not built quite the same. Asides from La Mancha, Nubians and Toggenburgs I'm not good at identifying goats very well.
While I'm at it I'll tell you the story of this boy.

Last Sunday I got a call from my landlord, and old boss, who is also a veterinarian, asking if we were missing a goat as a deputy found one at the end of our road that was attacked by dogs and had brought him to the clinic. Well we used to have sheep, and have on little 'special' ram left who is with us for life, but no goats. So I called back and left a msg. saying no we didn't have any, but would be willing to take a look at him and give him a home if need be.
I had to go by the clinic anyways the next day and I asked to see the goat. Well they were so packed and the new vet he has up there was running the show since Doc. had left for the holiday (and she and I don't get along btw) and she said she didn't have time to mess with him. Well Doc originally had him in an indoor kennel, but she moved him outside on the back deck in a large open wire dog crate with the sun on him all day long, not to mention 98 degree weather. So not even seeing him wounds I immediately said load him in the car he's coming home, as he was severely dehydrated just from being out in the sun. As I was getting ready to put him in the car I got a good look at his wounds. His right ear was completely torn off his head, his lef ear sustained substantial trauma and was nearly severed, and his left front leg, although not an open wound was about 3 times the size it shoul have been. There are minor abrasions on that leg, but because it was a crushing injury caused by the dogs pressue behind it's bite almost all the ligaments, muscle and tendons from the elbow down are crushed and ruptured. To make things worse...since he was left out in such poor conditions flies and bots were in the wounds. So I whisked him away to the barn where he has been covering for the past 7 days, today.

The first three days were touch an go, getting him hydrated and cleaning the wounds was my top priority. I put him on antibiotics, B complex, priobitics and electrolytes, and gave him one of those small rabbit mineral disks, he loves that because he can pick it up and carry it around with him to suck and lick on it. Each day he has perked up more and more. On the 4th I suspected a sub. qu. blood clot in the leg, he started swelling again. I had to make a small inciscion and work that out, one of the largest ones I have seen. Hooked him up to and I.V. to break up any other bruising and replenish his fluids, and also spent about two hours tractioning the leg out to make sure circulation was allowed to move through. The vet I don't agree with came out the next day, and was telling me working on the leg was a waste of time and that amputation was the best thing to do. Well I refused, as I will devote all my time and energy to getting anything to make a full recovery. I have no problem with amputation when it is needed, but the only reason she wanted to do it was because she felt it was too time consuming.

By Friday he was up and finished the pound of grain in his bucket and ate his flake of hay. He was drinking 2 litres a day, and was looking bright and happy. We took our first walk outside and he loved it but got tired easily. Saturday he took a longer walk and was eating everything in sight. Yesterday he was ever more upbeat and was out for nearly 2 hours, he even ran! He does take frequent breaks, but managed to squirm underneath the gate the meet the horse, donkeys and our little ram. He took it all in stride. The ears are almost completely healed, and he actually had some mobility in the leg yesterday so hopefully in a few more weeks we'll really see progress there.

We're so happy to have him, and I'm am head over heels in love with this boy, who's name is Juan Pablo btw. He's sweet as he can be, not a mean bone in his body, even with those formidable horns! He loves to be petted and scratched and enjoys naps in the shade. He follows me absolutely everywhere and will 'talk' to us. We love him! My husband actually suggested looking into a girlfriend for him later down the road. Perhaps we're venturing into goats now!*lol* Sorry to make this a marathon I just had to tell his story. The leaps and bounds he has made in 7 days astounds me as those wounds should of taken weeks to heal. I honestly was not giving him good odds last Monday, roughly 50/50, but I knew he was something special and I was going to do my best, and he did his. Can't wait to go home and play with him tonight and go for our walk. If anyone can tell me what he is please let me know! Thanks everyone, enjoyed browsing through your goat adventures as well and look forward to discussing them with you!!

-Kristen

Oh, I'll post pics from last Monday (a bit graphic) and then a pics from yesterday showing his progress.









Oh! One last question. When he blinks the entire scelera covers the eyes, making it look like his eyes roll back into his head, is this normal? I have never seen this before, and it doesn't seem to bother him. I thought it may be because I used vinegar to clean the wounds and may of irritated his eyes but I haven't used vinegar for three days nows and he still does it. Thanks!
 

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He's probably a pygmy mix. Get him fixed, too. He'll make such a better pet fixed, and he doesn't have a need to breed. :) Watch out, goats are addicting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Donna,

Thanks so much and nice website btw! We're going to leave him intact for now, I don't want to put him under any more stress, and incase we do look into pursuing this later down the road on a small scale pleasure adventure we made need his services. We had talked about goats a while back, but decided we would hold off until we get the new house. Maybe then we'll branch out a bit. They are so much more personable then sheep!
 

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Wait to castrate him if it's too stressful at this point, good idea. Make sure pygmy is the breed you'd like to go in and then decide whether or not you want to wether him. You might also want to get him tested a couple times for CL (at least) before taking him to a new place. And yes, they are MUCH more personable than sheep. :)

Good luck with him, he's a friendly looking fellow.
 

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In the 29 years I have raised goats, we have had three times to witness the remarkable healing capacity of these animals. One time was a leg wrenched off. We counted noses one evening and were one short, found the wether stuck in a downed tree. After cutting the leg free and taking him back to the barn, when we saw him dive for mom's udder, we thought he just may make it, he was still in shock at that point. The courage that wether showed us was mind boggeling. Another time a doe got e coli in her udder and got down. Vet said she would not make it. Well, she did survive, but the udder did not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Dona,

He's got a full blood panel I took on him Tuesday that should be coming back from the lab either today or tomorrow depending on if the state lab's holiday schedule. I went for a full panel just to know his work up and such, probably won't be great for much since it was day two of his recovery and such, but just to rule out any contagious and non contagious diseases will make me feel better. He seems fit as a fiddle all things considered but I just don't like that chance. I'm a nut about stuff like that! Thanks for all your help. Not sure if we would do pygmy goats, I'm kind of intruiges by the Saaen. Milking is not really what I want to do, as our time is short enough, but the only dairy I can eat is goat products. We just want them for pleasure and weed control mostly. Pygmies are probably our best bet, but I'm looking forward to imersing myself in goat husbandry first!
 

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You're just way ahead of me, LOL. It's nice to hear a story like this... It's not often an uncastrated male goat gets as good a home. Thank you. :)

As for milking, it's not that huge of an effort. Finding somewhere to put all the milk is, however, lol. Once you get used to it, it's really not so bad... Most people could probably own a couple milkers. If time is really an issue, though, I suggest keeping the milking numbers down to one or two, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Goatsareus> Good for them and for you all! Almost all of our animals have either been injured, abused, have health problems, or for some personal reason the owners could not care for them any more they gave them up. We take in any animal that needs a chance. Little Juan makes one more, and we're only too thrilled to have him. I can't wait for him to fully recover, he's quite remarkable. Thanks for sharing your adventures, it's always so heart warming to hear the testament of charisma and a little T.L.C.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dona> *lol* I'll try and slow down a bit. I really appreciate you sharing your experiences with goat life. Like above to goatsareus we give anything a home. I have milked goats in the past and absolutely loved it, that's how I got hooked on milk and cheese and icecream made from goats milk. I may look into doing it like you said on the very small scale*l* We'll see how it goes with Juan first, I think if he did bring anything contagious in it's to goats itself!*lol*
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
JRF: I don't know why they didn't load for you, they appear to be working fine on my end. And we're glad to have him with us :)

Lizzieag: I may look into doing that. I want something with a little more size to them. I know a few folks who have Nubian's we used to work with when I was working for the vet. They have some pretty ones, and I think one doe would be sufficient for us for the time being, whenever we decide to venture forth into goat raising. Thanks for this suggestion!

On another note Juan used the leg lastnight, just a bit about 10 steps. However the flexion and range of mobility is great so I'm very pleased with the progress. He's a cute little twirp. He reared up and started hopping around the yard doing little twists and flips. We ended up tethering him though as he was getting a bit too adventurous for my comfort, and it was just too darn hot to chase him around*lol* He's so funny he can't stand it if I get out of his sight, he startes bleating and carrying on. Never really thought of myself as a goat person until now!
 

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:) uh, has anyone mentioned you REALLY can not keep one goat? :)

Or they will "He's so funny he can't stand it if I get out of his sight, he startes bleating and carrying on." :p
 
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