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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So only had Dexter cow & calf 1 week come Friday, we have went from her being scared & shy to now being very 'up in my face' when I come in, I have 2 goats in with her & her baby been fine until last few days she has become more social but of course wanting fed? How do I nip this, I'm totally new at this & don't want to get hurt or my goats! She was upset this evening because I hadn't fed her yet & started clawing the ground like a bull..I been just walking away from her & saying No but it's getting a lil scary because feeding time she runs to me & goats are there also wanting fed. I really need help before she gets out of hand with any techniques to get her under control before one of us get hurt & I want to be able to love on her like I do my goats eventually!
Thanks in advance
 

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When you find a cow or bull getting too close to you, check the scents you may be wearing. perfumes and colognes are designed to cause this kind of behavior. Cattle are many times more sensitive to the chemicals in scents than we are.

Shower and don't put on anything afterward. dress in clothes that have never been worn with scents. Then, go back and see if it made a difference in how your cow reacts to you.

When you come home from work, don't stop to check on the cattle. Go home, wash off any scents you may have on and change into your farm clothes and boots. Then go back and check on the cattle.
 

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My suggestion: Since I know absolutely ZERO about goats, I'd move the goats to a separate area. Feed the cow/calf pair in a separate confined area, just stand nearby (outside the fence) without threatening her space. Talk to her, don't try to touch her or anything until she accepts your presence. It may take some time as she is protecting her calf (which, really, is a good thing). Most animals do things on their time frame, not ours. Give it time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My suggestion: Since I know absolutely ZERO about goats, I'd move the goats to a separate area. Feed the cow/calf pair in a separate confined area, just stand nearby (outside the fence) without threatening her space. Talk to her, don't try to touch her or anything until she accepts your presence. It may take some time as she is protecting her calf (which, really, is a good thing). Most animals do things on their time frame, not ours. Give it time.
Thanks, I'm not totally new to goats, but yes new, (April 15 is when I got her & babies) but now cows, yes other than a kid & teen was raised w 1 cow, lots of goats & 3 Shetland ponies along w other farm animals, but I'm in my mid 50's now & have lost all that knowledge!
I have electric fence so no way of putting feed on outside, fortunately they don't come close enough to it for me to make this work & I want to spend as much time w her as I can, I believe she will do well if I just understand how to do the right thing & not wrong from the start, that's why I'm asking..just trying to eventually have 1 big happy family I'm hoping
 

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The chances you can ever turn the cow and her calf into behaving more like a puppy just can't happen. They're not wired that way and that's the reason why I wouldn't let my hubs put cattle on our place. Just too dangerous. A horse will do everything in its power not to trample you. Not bovines. They will plow right through you.

Your goats are very different and nowhere near as dangerous but they are still dangerous if they have their horns. They like their humans pretty good. Cows could care less, they just want their food and will trample you for it.
 

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I will say up front that I am not an expert. I only raise out dairy steers for meat. In my experience, as long as you stay alert and ready to bop the offending nose of a cow, you can train your bovine to be reasonably friendly.

Some folks find that a hot stick or one of those flashlights that give a milder zap are helpful.

But feeding from the other side of the fence is a good idea. I do that with my goats as well, especially the bucks. The buck pen is hot wired, but I am able to pour their concentrates into the trough going through the cattle panel on which the trough is hung.

Are you planning to milk that cow? If so, you are going to have to make her reasonably handle-able, if not friendly. Food is a motivator for most beasts.
 

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Had a nice family milk cow. She was running in to get her morning feed and stepped on my toe and broke it. A cow too friendly is just as dangerous as one that is too skittish.

We feed our steers (jersey's) in a long black feeder in the same dry lot as the goats. The buck goats stand in the feeder and try to get some of the grain. The steers knock them out of it while they are eating. It is a free for all and not one I want to be near.
Saying this though. We get the cattle as bottle calves and they grow up around the goats, except they can't get in the barn where the goats can stay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The chances you can ever turn the cow and her calf into behaving more like a puppy just can't happen. They're not wired that way and that's the reason why I wouldn't let my hubs put cattle on our place. Just too dangerous. A horse will do everything in its power not to trample you. Not bovines. They will plow right through you.

Your goats are very different and nowhere near as dangerous but they are still dangerous if they have their horns. They like their humans pretty good. Cows could care less, they just want their food and will trample you for it.
I'm beginning to realize this & wonder if I should have just stuck with the goats unfortunately 😥
 

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You got a LOT of good info here.
Go back and read all of it again, real slow.

I grew up on a dairy farm. The cows were working animals. Not pets.
The bull was a danger. Dad finally got sold him.
I know of a child who got killed by a cow. A farmer who got in a pen with a
cow and she hurt him bad. And 2 weeks later, he died from those injuries.
And a friend who had to roll under a wagon, to escape a mad cow in the pasture.

Pen your cow separate from the goats. It will be the best solution.
She has a baby. That is her priority to protect.
 

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Give yourself time to learn.
THIS!

There is a learning curve with all farm animals, some steeper than others.

You can do it. You've kept the goats alive so far, and I've no doubt you will figure out what makes your cow tick, and you'll do just fine.

You're asking questions, and that's important. Better than muddling along and worrying.
 
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