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Discussion Starter #1
What is too long in between kids. had one born an hour ago, there is still one in her, but she's not pushing. How long do we wait?
 

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Did you go in to check and see if there is another one in there?

Most of mine were one right after the other. Although I have one doe who will not push the next one out until she has completely cleaned the first one off, so she takes forever to kid. I did have another doe who kidded one at 8am then the next did not come until 11am.

Hopefully someone with more experience will check and give some good advice.
 

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If it has been an hour, you need to lube up and go in and check and see if there is another before her cervix closes.

Is this a first freshener, a full-sized goat, a Mini?

You can use dish soap as a lube if that is all you have. Just be as clean as possible. Insert you hand into her and keep going, you can go way up to you elbow and reach, reach. The cervix feels like a bracelet or a ring around your wrist pretty far in, maybe 12 inches, a guess. If you feel a kid in the canal, grab the feet and pull it out. If there is nothing in the birthcanal, then go through the cervix into the actual uterus and feel for a kid. If it's back is against the cervix, or it is malpresented, then rearrange it, can be very difficult, requiring strength and pull it out by the two feet. This is better than leaving it in there til the cervix closes and they both die or a vet has to do a c-section.

Or there may be just a single kid. I check mine if I am worried.
 

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Normally they come one right after another, but one of my senior does did this last kidding. It was several hours between her first kid and her other two. I thought since she was getting older, that she only had one, and did not check. She then had trouble with milk let down, and I did eventually have her to the vet with complications of that. So if you still have not seen another kid, and are sure there is another, you might want to check with the vet. Perhaps a shot of oxytocin now could save you and her some trouble later. Wouldn't hurt to ask the vet's opinion on it.
mary
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ok, I guess that was just a lot of contracting we saw. We went in and there was nothing in the birth canal, so we "bounced" her and didn't feel another kid. Thanks :eek:)
 

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Watch her for any abnormal behavior such as not eating and laying around. Watch for a foul smelling discharge like "death" or something rotten. She will have a dischrge for weeks possibly which is fine, but it should not be foul. Many of us "sniff" the back ends to be sure :) Take a temp if you have concerns about infection or a dead kid still in there decomposing and the doe is acting off.

Congrats on the baby, all is probably just fine :)
 

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JRF said:
After going inside you are going to want to start her on a round of antibiotics also.
Not unless the doe needs them. Watch for temp and infection, and THEN treat. i check does often, in fact, i had three very difficult births this year, I was into the uterus far past the cervix and did not have to treat with antibiotics as the does did not get an infection. Just going into the vagina is not going to necessarily make the doe ill. It usually self-cleans. Overuse of antibiotics is never a good thing. besides, the effects of antibiotic use on the rumen can be worse than what you are trying to prevent. Why upset rumen flora when there is no problem?
 

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This is one of the few times I will use antibiotics as a preventative. I learned the practice with cows, where a single death can mean big money lost. Antibiotics are given in this case as a prophylaxis. It's vet-textbook proper, and is not an overuse or misuse of antibiotics. It is done to prevent death and the consequent loss of value, and also to prevent establishment of infectious disease to such a degree that it takes massive intervention to then cure it. A single shot SQ of LA200 or a knockoff thereof is all that is needed to nip anything in the bud before it gets bad.
 

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Hm-- this is an intersting thread. While I think it makes sense for meat goats to start antibiotics, I would wait if it was a dairy doe. I mean - we see the back ends twice a day every day - can tell in a timely manner if infection is setting in. ...just my .02. :)
 

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I too, would wait. I have "gone in" over forty dairy does this year alone, and not had an infection from any, no antibiotics used. I of course, am sanitary about it. The exception I might make is if it was out in the field with no way to wash up before-hand. If the doe passes all the placenta properly, she does a very good job of flushing herself out.
Especially in this instance, they said they only went in as far as the birth canal. I've been in up to my elbow and shoulder in some does with no problems resulting in infection.
 

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I have NEVER given antibiotice when I have gone in. I would guess I have just been lucky, that I have never had any trouble. I even had a doe that I went in her after she delivered twins, 20 hours later and I pulled another baby out. Never gave her anything but calcium
 

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I've also gone in many times and never gave antibiotic and all were fine. But management is a result of experiences and I could well see if you had one bad experience, you'd want to give something for any possible infection.
 

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Dairy herds and meat herds are managed differently. Dairy does are inspected closely and often just by the very nature of their purpose on the farm. They are put on the milkstand twice a day and closely inspected for anything that might hinder their performance. A uterine infection would be noticed in time to treat and prophylactic use of antibiotic takes the doe out of production during the time the milk has to be tossed.
 
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