Help! He's Willin' But They Won't!

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by familytrees, Nov 21, 2003.

  1. familytrees

    familytrees Member

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    May 30, 2003
    I'm having a problem with my does. I have a Californian buck who is more than willing to service my does; but try as he might, none of my seven does will allow him to breed with them. They just run around the cage and then tuck their tails so that he can't get to them. I could understand it if it were only ONE doe, but all SEVEN?! Any suggestions? :confused:
     
  2. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    594
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    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    centeral Okla. S of I-40, E of I-35
    Right now all of my does are in the same cage, and and my oldest doe will not breed,(the others are too young) when I get more cages built I will put one doe cage next to a bucks cage so they can frustrate each other and hopefully she will get in the mood,

    I have read to swap cages for a few days (buck and doe) so the doe will get in the mood from smelling the bucks cage, (Check her for pinkness) then put her back in her cage with the buck, let them breed, and back to his cage he goes, I have also let the doe and buck run loose in the yard to get her bred. (while I watched for safety)
     

  3. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Arkansas
    I have had the same problem with does that quit breeding during the summer heat. One would not breed even after a month of cool weather.

    Another poster some months ago suggested caging the doe on the ground for a week. I did this; I put the doe on the ground in a 4' x 4' cage, no bottom, on grass. She got no feed, only water. She ate grass or nothing. I did give her a nest box for shelter and covered the cage during rain.

    Put her in Sunday, she bred this morning, Friday.
    Ox
     
  4. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Any time I've had problems I would hold the doe, with my hand under her rump, using my fingers to hold it in the air and point it in his direction. He usually gets the hint, and helps himself.

    Is this the first time they have been with a buck? If so, once you help them out,they usually get the picture. Sure leaves a lot to be dseired, though. I've only had one doe ever just do what she was supposed to do without a fight. :rolleyes:
     
  5. Tracy

    Tracy Well-Known Member

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    May 2, 2002
    Location:
    PA
    I have not had a lot of time to post latley but here is what you need to do.

    Forget holding the doe. Even if you force breed the chances of conception will be minimal. All animals goe by a biological time clock for breeding. In the wild a rabbit that is bred now and kindle 31 days later would not have kits that would survive in the wild. That is why you are not having luck with breeding. Their "biological time clock" is telling them this is not the time to breed.

    Kepp your rabbits under lights minimum 14 hours a day. [I leave my lights on 24/7]. This will keep them breedings, NOT temps,the key to breeding, just like chickens, is light.

    Keep lights on for 2 weeks, check vulvas [red vulvas means receptive] and go from there.

    I have many Amish growers that have 0 productivitiy because thay can not supplemet light in the winter months due to not having electricity.
     
  6. wynterwren

    wynterwren Active Member

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    Nov 20, 2003
    Location:
    North Texas
    Hi,

    I'm new here...I'm an Angora breeder in North Texas. I raise Angoras for fiber and show animals. I also have Holland Lops in the bunny barn and a few Californians--not meat animals..just some really spoiled loved to pieces bunnies!!

    I agree with Tracy about the lighting--rabbits use the daylight hours to set their biological clocks by. Extending the day insures a better chance of breeding success...Just on a side note: I also add a few drops of wheat germ oil and vitamins to my does' food to be sure they're high health before breeding.

    I do hold the doe and lift her bottom up the majority of the time. It's not so much because I want to force the breeding as it is that the doe just runs around and wears the buck out before he's had a chance to service her. I breed the rabbits, wait eight hours and do it again. I've always had litters of 8-12 kits.

    This is what works for me...It may not work for everyone or on every breed rabbit.

    Susan
     
  7. familytrees

    familytrees Member

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    May 30, 2003
    Thank you all so much for your suggestions! I had already tried "force breeding" the does with no success. I think my next approach will be to try Tracy's suggestion of keeping them well lit for a couple of weeks and see what happens. Again, thanks to all for the great suggestions!