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Twin-Reflection Nubians
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I thought maybe I have heard it somewhere that beagles are hard to house train. I do believe this to be a very true phrase.



Riggley is my sister and BIL's 10 week old Beagle. She got him from some people when he was WAY too young to be weaned. (She felt sorry for him it was not her choice to have him weaned that early.) He was about 5 weeks old then. He is now 10 weeks old and he still is not house broken. Not really even close.

She takes him out when he wakes up, after he has eaten, and several times throughout the day. He will go outside and squat. (I think to appease her.) Then he will come back inside and poop or pee right after he's been out. (Sometimes the minute after.) He is told "No" and showed what he did then taken outside again. It isn't sinking in to him. I don't know what else to do or have her do.

My sister just found out she was pregnant and isn't feeling good and I talked to her this morning and he had pooped in the house 3 times already and once on their bed. (Their bed is on a box spring on the floor so he cn climb up in it.) She is almost to the point of trying to find him a good home. With her being sick and having to take care of his messes it's just not a good situation and I know she is frustrated.

He does have a crate but he needs a new one as he has figured out how to escape that one.

He was sick for awhile with coccidia and he had a bad case of worms but he if fine now and UTD on everything so that shouldn't be a contributing factor.

Do any of you have any ideas what we should do to stop this behavior? Would keeping him in a large crate 24/7 except for meal and a couple play sessions and walking a day help? I really don't know what else to do... Help
 

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It's totally unreasonable to expect a 10 week old puppy to be housebroken. I'm sure we'll hear from people who's pups were "house trained at 6 weeks" but that's just NOT the case for 99% of pups.

From your description of the puppy being taken to the "accident" and shown what it did, I assume the puppy is loose in the house. An unhousebroken puppy can not have ANY freedom in the house. A crate is great when you absolutely can't watch the pup, a leash is wonderful when you can kind of watch the pup, and he can be loose in a small area when you can totally watch the pup. Baby gates are wonderful also to keep the pup in one room or out of certain places.
 

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It's totally unreasonable to expect a 10 week old puppy to be housebroken. I'm sure we'll hear from people who's pups were "house trained at 6 weeks" but that's just NOT the case for 99% of pups.
I agree 100% with that. I also think people who say there pups were trained at 6 weeks old don't realize that its not the pup that been trained yet. They are the ones who have been trained and are picking up on its cues that it has to go out. In other words, they are awesome at reading their puppy.

This may sound a little harsh, but they are setting very unrealistic expectations for this puppy. Crapping all over the house tells me its not being supervised. Crating it 24/7 would be cruel and it would learn nothing from it. Chances are you would end up with a hyperactive dog with no manners. Things are not going to get better when a baby comes a long. She is going to be crunched for more time and thats less time to devote to the dog. Dogs don't train themselves. Its probably best to find it a new home while its in the cute puppy stage. Once they are out of the cute puppy stage they are hard to find homes for because there are so many of them needing homes. I'm sure this ideas not going to be very popular but I think it needs a new home.
 

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Ditto the above. He's too young. It'd be like potty training a human infant who isn't even walking yet: he just doesn't have the mental or physical capacity yet to understand or do what you want.

You CAN'T let a puppy lose in the house without actively supervising it. Even if it doesn't whizz on the carpet or leave you a surprise on the couch, puppies chew. The puppy could very easily chew something that it shouldn't -- if it chews your shoes, you need a new pair of shoes. If it chews an electrical cord or something poisonous, you then need a new puppy, which I'm sure nobody wants.
 

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This little fellow is WAY too young to be housebroken. When he is around 6 months old he should be fairly reliable. Make sure he is "in view" at all times. If he is to be unsupervised he should be placed in a pen or crate. Make sure his meals are supervised and take his water away at around 6 pm. Free feeding babies makes house training a night mare. Pup wakes up outside he goes. Pup eats out he goes. pup plays, out he goes. The only time he will be reliable at this point is when he is sleeping :)
 

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Chihuahuas mature very very quickly and therefore can be housebroken (with the right owner!) by 12 weeks of age. Twelve. Chihuahua. Experienced, on the mark owner.

They need to nuetralize the oder using a product made for such, or a white vinegar solution. Then, feed the puppy on the spots he used for pottying. Just keep rotating the dish every day. They also need to feed him a top quality food. They will not find a top quality food in the grocery store. Look for a food with a whole meat as the first ingredient. If they feed him a high quality food, he will not only need to poop few times, but he will be able to hold it longer.

They need to know his schedule. How long after he eats does he need to relieve himself (25 to 35 minutes)? At the appropriate time, someone calls the puppy to the door, has him sit, then clips the leash on the puppy and takes him outside (puppy learns to sit at the door when he wants to go out). Walk around the yard with him, staying in the location you want him to use as his bathroom. Have a treat in hand, the second he has finished (make sure something came out) praise and give treat. Instead of going back in the house, pat your leg and get him to follow (this trains him to follow you to the leg pat). Keep him moving for another five minutes. You will probably find that he wasn't finished "going" and will pee after a minute and may even poop some more. He is learning that play starts after pooping, where to poop, and that pooping outside is more rewarding than pooping inside. It is doing no good to scold or punish the puppy. Dogs are attracted to a surface (cement, grass, carpet), not inside or outside.

One of the problems puppies face when removed from the litter too young is inability to housebreak. This puppy is going to take longer than normal to housebreak.
 

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I agree with about all of what was said. Personally, my puppies are pretty much house broken when they go to thier new homes at 10 weeks....but I put a lot of time into that and have them on a strict schedule and crate train as well. I can understand she feels under the weather, so maybe the easiest option at this point is to litter train him while working on outside. My puppies are litter trained from the time they can stumble out of the whelping box. When it comes time to start taking outtings, they have no problem transferring. I have even went back to using the box with one litter when the weather was way too nasty for them to go potty outside for a week, and they did not even blink at the change. I use a horse feed tub for small litters with horse bedding pellets (Equine Pine). I start them by putting a feces in the box. Once they start using it, they will continue. You may help the pup out by placing him in the box when you see he is "about to go" and then preventing him from leaving it until he does go. After he goes then let him out- no praise. Ignore him when he uses the box, but praise when he goes potty outside. I am all for using exercise pens to keep a puppy that cannot be watched 100%. Place the box and his crate inside the pen and place the pen in the room that is used most. It is not a punishment, simply containing him in a smaller area of the room. You may be able to use a baby play yard for a pup that size. When it is bed time, give him a signal that it is bed time- light a scented candle or play some soft music and after about 15 mins- place him in his crate with a stuffed toy. No bedding. In the morning, take him out to potty as Maura said then bring him back in for breakfast. Then take him out again as soon as he is finished. Playtime. I put my pups down for a nap in their crate in the middle of the day. I wake them with thier lunch and then take them out. Then it is playtime- if he cannot be supervised, he should be in the pen. He should ahve the chance to go outside at least every 4 hours during the day. Then dinner time and outside. Playtime and out, then music/candle...then bed. He should settle into the routine in a few days and know what to expect.
 
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