Hello Everyone, a couple Goat Questions!!!!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by ONThorsegirl, Jul 4, 2006.

  1. ONThorsegirl

    ONThorsegirl Fergusons Family Farm

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario
    Hello Everyone, I do not have a goat YET, but we have cattle, sheep, horses, and various poultry breeds.

    I have the chance to get either an Alpine, Saanen or a cross between the 2. It will be a wether, and a pet. No purpose other than to keep us company be spoiled and be a pet.

    Questions are:
    Are these breeds friendly?
    Do wethers have the same buck smell?
    Will the Goats get along with the sheep, and sheep along with Goat?

    Any advice or suggestions you have for me?


    The lady with these goats will be coming to my house tomorrow to pick up a couple ducks, and she can bring a little goat with her, she is not asking a price she just wants to find a good home for her little guys.

    Melissa
     
  2. Farmgirl2005

    Farmgirl2005 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    149
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Location:
    PA
    they dont have the same buck smell... they dont use their scent glands b/c they have no urge to scent themselves and everything in there territory...they are friendly breeds i think so anyway.. and i am not sure about the sheep but i think they would... they are smarter then sheep.. and without proper fencing can escape... mine have yet to try.. besides when i go in the area.. they need a copper enriched mineral block and this may entail different minerals then your sheepies..wethers can not get reall rich feed..(real rich on calcium) b/c it causes urinary calci.. large crystal deposits that can cause serious problems..there is losts more you should know.. research research research.. is all i can really say... b4 owning any animal...
    Hope this helps some
    Hopeful they rest will give you better advice..
    Lyn
     

  3. rranch

    rranch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    220
    Joined:
    May 18, 2006
    Location:
    WA St
    I agree, do your research. Goats are wonderful pets, especially wethers. They are sweet and social. They usually get along with all other animals and people. I have heard(not educated on) that you shouldn't put sheep and goats on the same pasture. I have no idea why. So definitely do your research.
     
  4. Ramblin Acres

    Ramblin Acres Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    94
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2005
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    wethers are great pets and we have an alpine wether and a saanen wether both are just great.I know alot of people will run their goats with sheep but I know that goats need a little more copper and if Iremember right sheep are very copper sensitive.So you may want to do your homework their.But if you are getting wethers you really don't want to feed them grain just a good quality mix hay will do.Goats love browse more then grass so make sure you have plenty of browse where you are going to keep them. They also still need the same care as breeding goats as in vaccinations,feet trimming and de worming.

    Good luck
     
  5. ONThorsegirl

    ONThorsegirl Fergusons Family Farm

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario
    Thank you everyone, I'm familier with hof trimming, worming, and vaccinating, as all of these procedures have to be done with our sheep. I wasn't sure about the copper and since we have cattle we do have copper in some of our mineral blocks (that the sheep can't get) also the horses have copper in their mineral bloacks as well.

    How are goats for handleing the cold?

    Melissa
     
  6. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Joined:
    May 28, 2002
    Location:
    oklahoma
    the goat will do fine on the cattle/horse blocks if he has access to them. no grain is necessary, as already stated, just a good hay and plenty of browse (weeds, trees, etc) protect your fruit trees-they will bark and kill them. also cedars and pines. the goat should get along fine w/the sheep-both are herd animals and have been raised together for years. if you want something other than white, go with the alpine.
     
  7. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,429
    Joined:
    May 30, 2005
    Location:
    Southeast Ohio
    Wethers are absolutely wonderful pets.

    As for breed, I have two Nubians and 6 Nubian/Alpine crosses with various percent Alpine. I love them all, but the Alpine crosses are noticeably heartier goats. I'm sure part of that is just from being mixed breed, but the Alpine contribution is also part of it.

    The Alpine crosses of ours have denser and more compact coats and handle the cold better than the Nubians. And some of them are only 1/8 to 1/16 Nubian, and share a lot of genetics with the purebread Nubians - so it looks like breed rather than bloodline is making the difference. We really do feel that the Alpine in them makes them stronger goats. It also gives them a bit more attitude - a little scrappier, but not too bad. The attitude is good for goats who have a lot of woods access where they have to think for themselves. But if they were only "barn potatoes", I think they might get a bit more restless than a mellow breed goats. All are charming and loving, but the Alpine crosses hold the Herd Queen and various guardian roles.

    In fact, the de-horned 1/4 Alpine has been queen in 2 of the 3 herds she has been in - even after entering a herd as a newcomer. The only reason she wasn't able to take herd queen position here was because her 1/8 Alpine daugther already had the job for two years and was not about to give it up to anybody - not even Mom!

    The crosses handle the coldest weather well. The pure Nubians handle it, but are so much less happy about it.

    If it was my choice, I'd jump at the chance to get the Alpine cross.

    Lynda
     
  8. ONThorsegirl

    ONThorsegirl Fergusons Family Farm

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario
    Thanks once again everyone,

    Well the Alpine Cross is Alpine/Saanen. What do people have to say abut the saanen. I do know some what about Goats and from what I think Saanen are a very dairy goat type. Anyone had this cross or know of any advice about that. I would like to get a cross, I like crosses, of ever species, I really do feel that they get the benifits from both breeds, proven in our cows, horses and our sheep.

    If we decide to get this little fella he will be kept in the barn with our show lambs until he gets friendly and used to us, and then he will go outside with the sheep and cattle. He won't be kept in the barn all the time, I don't think thats fair.

    Ok so no grain at all! We feed our lambs whole barly, and whole corn, and alfalfa pellets. Along with great hay, they also have full access to a salt block and a mineral block.

    Thanks, Melissa
     
  9. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Joined:
    May 28, 2002
    Location:
    oklahoma
    the saanen is the largest of the dairy breeds popular in the US. i know little about them, i prefer lots of color in my fields. hybrids are healthier than purebreds-
     
  10. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,429
    Joined:
    May 30, 2005
    Location:
    Southeast Ohio
    Do you have your new little goat yet? Which one did you pick, and where are the photos?

    :)

    Lynda
     
  11. ONThorsegirl

    ONThorsegirl Fergusons Family Farm

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario
    Thanks guys,

    Nope not yet, the lady couldn't come today she is coming tomorrow afternoon. I also like colour thats why I was hoping more to the Aplines.

    I will definitly get some pictures an post them.

    Melissa
     
  12. rranch

    rranch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    220
    Joined:
    May 18, 2006
    Location:
    WA St
    I have 3 boer percentages, one sanaan doe, one nubian doe, and one lamancha wether that intermingle with my herd of pygmies. 19 of those including several wethers with 4 bucks(seperated of course) any how I grain all my animals together, never have divided them to feed. Feed the wethers right along with the does. I know others that do the same, some don't. I don't or havn.t had any complications. But my goats free range 8 hours a day on very heavy wooded areas then grained and locked downed for the night in a smaller pen with less foliage and a mix of clover and alfalfa. My animals think i'm the best. they hop around and spin circles when my truck comes down the driveway.
    Also, it's phospourus(sp)not the calcium that causes urinary calculi in goats.
     
  13. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Actually, the problem is an IMBALANCE of phosporus and calcium. Young growing goats won't be hurt by having a little grain, but when he's mostly grown it would be better to stop the grain, as he really won't need it. Castrating late is thought by some to be helpful, too, as the ureter stops growing in diameter when the little bucks are castrated.

    If he's a Saanen X Alpine, more than likely he'll be pure white, as white seems to be quite dominant in goats. But a cross likely will be a little hardier than a purebred.

    Kathleen
     
  14. ONThorsegirl

    ONThorsegirl Fergusons Family Farm

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario
    Well The lady couldn't bring the goat this morning, she had to bring her daughter and her daughter was crying because of the thought of selling their favorite little goat. The women was describing him and the reason she wants to find him a good home is that he is so friendly and calm that she would hate to see him go..(you imagination will take you there)

    He is brown with dark brown/black legs, about 70 ish pounds she said. I can still have him but we would have to work out a time and date. But at least this gives me more time to do some research.

    Melissa