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If I need a Shelter
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Ok this is our first time ever heating with Fireplace Insert. Have heated most my life with Wood Stove.

Ok I load this up before going to Bed, does well. Been putting more wood in 2-3AM, gets way too hot in the house. Wait until 5-6AM still warm enough but may not have coals to restart the fire.

Does anyone else deal with this? By too hot it gets 110 degrees.

big rockpile
 

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I have a very inefficient insert in my fireplace. I can only get about 3-4 hours max out of loading it up.
All winter I sleep in my recliner in the living room and wake up periodically and add a log or two.
Our house is about 1900 sqft, 2 story. Right now it is 26* outside, 76* downstairs and 73* upstairs in the house.
 

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Ok this is our first time ever heating with Fireplace Insert. Have heated most my life with Wood Stove.

Ok I load this up before going to Bed, does well. Been putting more wood in 2-3AM, gets way too hot in the house. Wait until 5-6AM still warm enough but may not have coals to restart the fire.

Does anyone else deal with this? By too hot it gets 110 degrees.

big rockpile
Does it get 110 in the whole house or just the room the heater is in? If just the room, use a fan/'s to move the air. I heated my 2000sqft house for years with a fireplace insert. At night/bed-time I would move all the fire to oneside and stack semi-dried wood all in the heater, close the drafts and close the damper most of the way. I always had good coals to get it jumping at day break(when I got up). Totally dry wood would burn hot and to fast. I installed a 8" flex duck/vent above the heater in the ceiling with a inline blower and thermostat close to the heater----pulling air from the fartherest rooms in the house----blowing down above the heater---this kept air movement in the house---made the back rooms warmer and the room the heater was in some cooler. If the fire died down some and the room got cooler the inline blower would cut off.
 

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If I need a Shelter
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Discussion Starter #4
Ok it gets 110 in the room it is in, 100 other end of the house. We have Fans on the Fireplace and Ceiling Fans.

Been closing the air off going into it. The Guy that inspected it said to leave the Damper Open. Seem strange to me always closing Damper on Wood Stoves.

Wood is seasoned been cut 3 years and dry.

big rockpile
 

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That is going to vary with the type of insert, your chimney design and the type and age of wood used. I find that by using oak seasoned about 1 year, mine will last all night and I'll still have a lot of coals in the morning (sometimes with some wood still burning). Unless it's really cold, ours tends to run us out of the house (in Alabama), so we prefer to run the wood stove in the basement. Winter storm 93, we didn't have any fans running and it was way too hot in our living room. We didn't have the basement wood stove or a generator then.
 

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According to what I've read, what my folks and other people have told me, and the limited experience in one house, fireplace inserts are very inefficient and pretty much useless for much of anything except a romantic night watching the flames. When I was growing up we had a Franklin Stove. It heated the vast majority of the house(Dad put a fan in a pre-existing vent above the stove to draw the warm air upstairs), he would bank the fire when we went to bed and there would still be enough coals to kindle a fire from in the morning. Added bonus, Mom could also cook simple meals on it in the event of a power outage lasting more than a few hours.
 

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I have a buck stove fireplace insert from the 1970s heating this house. The door gaskets need some work, but it is still pretty efficient and will keep this house relatively comfortable down to the single digits. It will last about six hours loaded with good, half dried oak. I can't imagine burning it hot enough to get that room to 110. I live in a split level of about 1500 sqft. Then, comfortable to me is in the lower 60s
 

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fireplace inserts are very inefficient and pretty much useless for much of anything except a romantic night watching the flames.
This Is Not true. I know there is a difference in how they are made. A good Built one works Good. I used a fireplace insert to heat my whole house (2000sqft) for many years---never using any other type of heat except in the back bathroom---using a little electric heater while bathing only. My fireplace inserts weight is 800 lbs. It was brought into my home using piano mover dollies. It took 4 men to pick it up 1ft to set it on the hearth. It was bought in 1980, still looks new today and when the renters use it they say it heats very good.
 

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Ok it gets 110 in the room it is in, 100 other end of the house. We have Fans on the Fireplace and Ceiling Fans.

Been closing the air off going into it. The Guy that inspected it said to leave the Damper Open. Seem strange to me always closing Damper on Wood Stoves.

Wood is seasoned been cut 3 years and dry.

big rockpile
Do this, get you some wood that has only been dried a short while(month or two), mix it with your dry wood as you fill the heater. Once the fire is burning good and your home is warm--Close the draft down and close the damper about 3/4ths the way to slow the air draw. I am sure you will see alot of difference than you do now. If you got a fire going in the heater----ALWAYS open the drafts/dampers a few minutes before you open the doors on the heater to tend the fire---if not you could get a flash when you open the doors.
 

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According to what I've read, what my folks and other people have told me, and the limited experience in one house, fireplace inserts are very inefficient and pretty much useless for much of anything except a romantic night watching the flames. When I was growing up we had a Franklin Stove. It heated the vast majority of the house(Dad put a fan in a pre-existing vent above the stove to draw the warm air upstairs), he would bank the fire when we went to bed and there would still be enough coals to kindle a fire from in the morning. Added bonus, Mom could also cook simple meals on it in the event of a power outage lasting more than a few hours.
An insert is nothing more than a woodstove built to fit inside a fire place.
I find it funny you can say that inserts are useless and talk about the good qualities of a wood stove.
Just as anything, there ate good ones and bad ones. The downfall of an insert compared to a free standing stove is radiant heat, you can feel the radiant heat from a stove and most of the radiant heat from an insert goes up the chimney.
 

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Sorry, I have to disagree. Inserts have dampers, just as wood stoves do. Mine has a blower--and I can heat my 100' house just fine--have for 20+ years. I'm using the propane furnace now, because it's difficult to get wood in
 

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I bought my mom and dad a decent insert years ago.

Usual routine is to close down the airflow (not completely, but waaay down), and fill up with greener oak (less than 1 year dry) before going to bed.

The house will cool down some, but not too much and there's always a few coals left for in the morning.
 

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Please point me in the direction of your inserts!!!!!!!!!!!!!
We bought as Regency "Hearth Heater" model several years ago.....best move we ever made. It combines the qualities of an insert with the radiant heating of a free standing model. It uses the 're-burn, gassifer' technology, and cut our wood use in half. Has a two speed fan. Also, you can cook on the top of it.

I'd HIGHLY recommend them. The only downside to them is the firebox is small.....it will not hold a fire with the air control rod out on 'high' the entire night. On really cold nights, I do get up around 2-3am and re-stock it.

When we bought ours, they made two sizes and I got the smaller of the two. Now, they only make this size (last time I checked). Unlike older stoves, which you didn't want to oversize (because wide open, they would run you out of the house, and air choked down, they would generate tons of creosote), with the new gassifier stoves, BUY THE BIGGEST firebox you can get....you can throttle them down and not produce much creosote the way the tube system re-burns the smoke/vapor products driven off the wood which is what produces the creosote.

 

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My fireplace and chimney are actual brick, mortar and tile. The master bedroom has the exposed back of the fireplace and chimney. :) Very nice radiant heat.
 

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If I need a Shelter
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Discussion Starter #18
Ok ours will hold 36 inch stick of wood, able to heat 3500 sq. ft.. We came home from Church had some coals I filled it, got it going. Shut it down, got 120 degrees fast, my wife open windows. 28 degrees outside.

Done decided just not fill it, most put 3 sticks wood in it.

big rockpile
 

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If I need a Shelter
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Discussion Starter #20
How big is your house?

If you have a stove/insert big enough for 3500sqft and your house is only a third of that, well, its going to get way too hot.
Yes the house is 1800 sq. ft.

big rockpile
 
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