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Quick question for you: I know cords differ in type. The 3-4 cords you use, are they face cords? I’m looking at a wood source and they’re selling face cords, 4’x8’x15” at $125 delivered and $110 for additional cords. If I had a truck and weren’t creaky I could pick it up from them for $80. Is this good or should I keep looking? I should be getting my stove on the first and was thinking about getting my wood near the end of the month or early October.
A cord is a 4X4X8 foot pile of cut and split and tightly stacked wood. A slightly rounded load in an 8 foot pickup box is about a half cord. Price depends on the species of the wood. Oak and maple are the most expensive. Pine and popple the cheapest. Don't burn pine on a regular basis and only if it's been curing for 2 years or more. Be sure the wood you are going to burn this year has been cured at least a year. Another factor determining price is the distance the seller has to go to deliver it.
Nimrod is right on with his post.

Now as far as price that is going to vary wildly in different areas of the country. The last time I bought firewood was about 5 years ago and paid $150 for a full cord cut, split, and delivered.

I live in an area of hundreds of thousands of acres of hardwood forest so it goes without saying that I only burn hardwoods. The last load I got was 100% Red Oak. I see out west it's common to burn soft woods like pine and spruce. That is actually unheard of around here - in my mind all that is going to do is cause you a chimney fire.

There are lots of opportunities to get your own firewood around here including obtaining permits from the forestry office. It's only $10 per cord but you have to haul it out of the woods yourself without any machinery. Another common way around here is to buy a tri-axle load of hardwood poles which they will deliver to your house. Then you can cut and split it at your leisure. Not sure of the price nowadays but I am guessing in the $700-$800 range for a whole bunch of firewood.
 

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That is actually unheard of around here - in my mind all that is going to do is cause you a chimney fire.
I burn pine and cedar because that is all we have here. But there is a big difference between the cedar we burn in New Mexico, than the cedar I grew up with in Michigan. There is dead cedar laying on the ground here that has been laying in the dirt for thirty or forty years, it is dry and hard as stone, with no rot. Chimney fires are caused by lack of maintenance, and trying to keep the stove dampened down to "hold the fire". I let my stove burn with vents open for twenty minutes every morning. And I take my stove pipe down every spring and check it. I have never had any build up in the seven joints of stove pipe, on my stove.
 
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