Heat pump seer value question

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Randy Rooster, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am putting a heat pump in my new house. I have a choice between a 14 and a 15 seer heat pump. The 15 is about $800 more. My question is for a 1300 square foot house at about 10 cents per kilowat what this seer difference might mean on an annnual or monthly cost basis for electricity.?
     
  2. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    That information should be located right on the sticker on the unit, will give you average cost per year.
    Just compare the average cost to see the ave cost saving.
    Example unit "A" 14 SEER $1000 per year to operate.
    unit "B" 15 SEER $ 900 per year to operate.
    difference $100.
    Unless you did a complete heat load comparison to YOUR house, there is really no other way to tell.
    BTW, SEER stands for Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating, sort of a arbitrary number.

    Some people seem to want to buy the best, no matter what the cost, and some people seem to want the cheapest they can get.
    Thats why they have different price ranges.
     

  3. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Randy, did you check out the geothermal heatpumps?
     
  4. liveswithinlogs

    liveswithinlogs Member

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    Bear in mind that the SEER rating for a given condenser (outdoor unit) is tied to a given evaporator/air handler package. An evaporator/air handler that differs from the optimum one used to obtain the advertised rating may mean you aren't getting the efficiency you think you are. Ask your salesman or contractor lots of questions, ascertain that you're indeed getting equipment that will perform to the level that you're paying for. A sticker on the condenser proudly proclaiming a SEER rating of 14 or 15 means nothing unless ALL the components in the system are matched to obtain that level of efficiency.