Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, very recently I noticed soot developing on the back splash right above the slider knob (which has become hard to move). Otherwise the cookstove appears to be operating as expected.

According to the manual: "The oven damper may stick from time to time because of a buildup of ashes or creosote in the damper track. To free up the damper, scrape out the buildup or spray with a creosote remover, let sit for about 1/2 hour and clean out debris."

Has any experienced the same? I just what to ensure I've been able to determine the proper diagnosis. Thanks.
 

·
Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
Joined
·
18,451 Posts
I've used a wood cook stove for 30 years and heated with wood for nearly 50 years. The old wood cook stoves have small fire boxes and are far from air tight. They have a hot, hard to control fire. The Elmira and its little brother the Sweetheart, have big fireboxes and are air tight. Bigger pieces of wood burn cooler and are apt to have more moisture. Filling your Sweetheart with big wood, then crank off the air and creosote will build fast due to the cooler stack temperatures. Get a thermostat with a magnet and stick it on the stove pipe. Keep the temps up. Reduce firewood size. Increase drying time. Don't run smoldering fires. I had a hot water, wood fired boiler. When I was new to wood heat, I hated the loss of heat up the chimney. I had no idea that wood heat requires a hot chimney. I added a heat miser. It fit between the furnace stove pipe and the chimney stove pipe. It was a box with a group of tubes. It did put out heat. But it plugged up in a few days and that cooler smoke also filled my chimney with creosote. That resulted in a chimney fire. I'd be concerned that if you are building creosote at the damper, you are filling your chimney, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've used a wood cook stove for 30 years and heated with wood for nearly 50 years. The old wood cook stoves have small fire boxes and are far from air tight. They have a hot, hard to control fire. The Elmira and its little brother the Sweetheart, have big fireboxes and are air tight. Bigger pieces of wood burn cooler and are apt to have more moisture. Filling your Sweetheart with big wood, then crank off the air and creosote will build fast due to the cooler stack temperatures. Get a thermostat with a magnet and stick it on the stove pipe. Keep the temps up. Reduce firewood size. Increase drying time. Don't run smoldering fires. I had a hot water, wood fired boiler. When I was new to wood heat, I hated the loss of heat up the chimney. I had no idea that wood heat requires a hot chimney. I added a heat miser. It fit between the furnace stove pipe and the chimney stove pipe. It was a box with a group of tubes. It did put out heat. But it plugged up in a few days and that cooler smoke also filled my chimney with creosote. That resulted in a chimney fire. I'd be concerned that if you are building creosote at the damper, you are filling your chimney, too.
Thanks. I will check for creosote and clean if necessary. The problem I have is that if I burn at a high temperature, then our cabin is way too hot (ie >25 C). I guess too hot is better than a chimney fire. The wood is dry, ie < 15% moisture.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top