Haying with a Ford 9N??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mountainman_bc, Dec 15, 2005.

  1. mountainman_bc

    mountainman_bc Well-Known Member

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    Next year I plan to somehow get hay off my field. I expect to have 6 sheep, 80ish poultry (mostly hay for beeding), and who knows what else, but basically 6 sheep + beeding for a long winter.
    I work what seems 24/7 for the entire growing season so I can't be out gathering with a rake. It just isn't feasable. I'm pooped after work.
    Any idea if my 9N can do it (and what attachment would I need?)
    Any other ideas? Neighboring farmers won't promise anything, depends on their work load. I'm new around here so don't have their trust I guess.
    Theres 10 acres. Thanks.
     
  2. Westwood

    Westwood Well-Known Member

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    Are you in a hurry? Does your climate demand that when the hay is cured you need to windrow it and bale it quick? These are things you need to realize with a Ford 9N. Acres? Those are the things to consider when haying. A Ford 9N can pull a bailer that has it's own power. They're as rare as hens teeth now.

    A Ford 9N is more suited to pulling a rake, but if you have short acres, short funds, and can find a baler with an engine on it, you're good to go. Not every farmer subscribes to the bigger the better, and I hope you find the implements we all used to use when I was a kid.
     

  3. jeffreyc256

    jeffreyc256 Well-Known Member

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    You are going to be limited with a 9N. I have two 8n's and tried to do some hay. I had purchased a MF 10 baler and the 8N which is stronger than your 9 would barely get the baler running and that was without any hay in it. I did find a 9 foot roller bar rake and a 5-6 foot sicle bar mower and they seemed to work fine. One disadvantage is the dead PTO in the 8-9N series. You have to be quick on the clutch sometimes. If you ignore the baler you could always cure the hay in the field and store it in a mow(bulk) and feed with pitchfork. I now have a 65 horse John Deere but havent had time to try the baler again.

    I would also recommend that you rotational graze and possibly just buy your hay. In the short sense its cheaper and less work.
     
  4. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    A 9N has less power than the average lawn tractor --- don't try it. BUT, if you insist, find an old Allis Chalmers small-round baler; other than replacing the belts and soaking, I mean SOAKING, everything in used oil the things will continue to do the job for you. Around here, they are free or mighty cheap.
     
  5. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There's a Japanese mini-baler being imported that will work down to 14 hp but short of a miracle, it costs a fortune.
    There's balers and then there's balers. I'm using an old Oliver 520 with my Farmal H. I believe it would work with less hp. You could put an aux engine on many balers but it might be hard to find the conversion parts. Find an issue of Rural Heritage and look at the powered forecarts. With one of those, you could bale with your car.
     
  6. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Isn't there something about the PTO on a 9N that makes it hard to bale with? Like, it's not a live PTO. The tractor needs to be moving for the PTO to turn, so your trying to get the baler turning and the tractor moving at the same time. Been years since I've ran one.
     
  7. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    I have an 8n and I have to agree with Jeffrey. If you have level ground and patience you might be able to cut your hay with a sicklebar mower (The Ford model would be a 501) with the caveat that it would be a problem with a 7 foot bar (I've tried). Pulling a small rake wouldn't be a problem. You definately will have issues trying to use pretty much any baler with a 9n.

    I second the idea of doing rotational grazing and buying hay. If you are willing to buy from the field when everyone is cutting you should be able to get hay fairly cheap.

    The other option would be to find someone to do it as custom work but then you are at the mercy of their reliability and other obligations (tried that too).

    As usual, just my 2 cents.

    Mike
     
  8. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you are working full time, you won't have the time nessesary to make hay. It has to be done when conditions are right. If you lay off work to do it you still could wind up with some moldy hay. Dollar wise buying the amount of hay you will need would cost you less than buying equipment, missing work, and still run the risk of spoiled hay. If you can let your stock pasture the hayfield year around it will take less hay to get them through the winter.
     
  9. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree with everyone else: A 9N would do the job IF you could find the implements for it, but while you could find a sickle bar mower and a rake, you are going to have a hard time with a baler.

    I would do this: Talk to the best farmer prospect you have, tell them you'll cut and rake WHEN IT'S CONVENIENT FOR THE FARMER and ask him if he'll just do the baling for you. This frees you up from purchasing a baler and it doesn't take up a lot of the farmer's time. Believe me, it's a real PITA to have someone pull in your yard and want you to do EVERYTHING for them when the money involved is not going to be worth your time and the only reason you do, really, is to be neighborly. Meanwhile, your own fields are waiting. But if someone is willing to do a good share of the work before you get there with just a single piece of equipment, that makes it a lot easier to say OK.

    You don't need the hay from 10 acres for six sheep and some birds. I don't have sheep experience to say how much you do need, but if you gave the farmer the hay you don't need, that would be a nice incentive for them to come and do the work for you, too.

    Good luck. Enjoy the 9N. :)

    Jennifer--->who also has a Jubilee tucked away in the barn.
     
  10. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lack of power isn't the critical problem, lack of a live pto is. You can't get that bailer started unless you've got the clutch out. That generally means you've got to be moving. Makes start-up very difficult, and those thick spots that you'd like to slow down in by pushing in the clutch are impossible.

    Not saying it can't be done, I know folks who do it. Just that it's real difficult with an N.
     
  11. HUBERT

    HUBERT Well-Known Member

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    I have a Dearborn sickle mower for an 8 or 9n if anybody would like it they can have it.If you are close enough to pick-up.
     
  12. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    just thinking back over the years...if we ever get a draught on the east coast again just let me know and i will tell my brother-in-law to make hay...it rains every single time.
     
  13. mountainman_bc

    mountainman_bc Well-Known Member

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    OK thank you for all the help!
    My problem with local farmers is they can't be relied on in case they end up busy- you lose out.
    There are two neighbors with the equipment, however they have both screwed over neighbors and I've been told to steer clear of them.
    I'll try placing ads for a baler with own power, though that sounds unlikely. Yup you have to drive for the PTO to spin. And first gear is pretty fast too- if the engine is running full.

    If I had a sickle mower and a rake, does this just rake it into piles which I will transport into a shed? Dumb question I guess but I've never done hay.
    I really don't want to spend cash on hay when I have a field(with a mortgage). Equipment will pay for itself over time- however how long is the 9N going to go... It's not something you want to invest in heavily that's for sure.
     
  14. HUBERT

    HUBERT Well-Known Member

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    If I had a sickle mower and a rake, does this just rake it into piles which I will transport into a shed?


    If you get a dump rake it will just put in piles -if you get a side delivery rake it will put the hay in windrows.I would recommend side delivery rake
    (less work)
     
  15. DorothyGail

    DorothyGail New Member

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    If you are close to Texas, we have a Ford Baler with its own pony motor. It was made to be used with the 8N or 9N. We used it a few summers ago with our 9N. Also, have a dearborn cutter and John Deere PTO rake. We have moved on to bigger equipment.

    DorothyGail
     
  16. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't think that is the longevity of the 9N that should be a concern, but the lack of live pto. I know that I find it hard enough to use my brushhog type mower with my 9N--you've got to be really paying attention to the tractor and the mower all the time. I think that baling would be 10x as hard, if the 9N had the power, which it doesn't. Those balers with the 2 cylinder Wisconsin engine on would be just the ticket. Otherwise, make a forecart as someone mentioned--some Amish and other horse farmers use them so they can run pto equipment behind a team of horses.

    Personally, I would buy hay and pasture my hay ground, or plant trees on it for a longer term crop--fruit, nuts, and timber. At least that is what I did, and my 9N should last for my grandkids--after all it is only going on 66 years and on its first overhaul.
     
  17. Michael83705

    Michael83705 Well-Known Member

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    Used to keep them running growing up.

    Pretty much my advice is the same as others:

    Get a sickle bar.
    Get a rake to windrow it so it cures.
    Get a hay cart or wagon and buy dinner or make cider\beer for your friends and make them bring a pitchfork :)

    Otherwise, if the local agri business farmers don't have time, go to an antique tractor show or two and see if any vintage person would come and bale for you.

    If you do try and run a small baler with a flywheel on the PTO learn to get it spinning and keep it spinning so it has inertia and then clutch, shift and go balancing keeping the baler running and keeping the tractor at optimum speed. It's a skill to make it work without tearing it up- they really are light for this work. Also might want to learn to use hard surface welding rod etc. for all the baler knives and teeth you can't get anymore.

    I'd just skip baling with it.

    Best of luck! I wish I could be out windrowing on a 8n in the summer!
     
  18. mountainman_bc

    mountainman_bc Well-Known Member

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    Thanks again everyone for all the help. I've sent an email to the closest tractor supply store asking for prices on sickle and rakes. For some reason nobody around here will sell used equipment they just throw it on the pile. Pretty lame indeed.
    There is a lot to ponder with all the responses!
     
  19. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Where ya at?
     
  20. catahoula

    catahoula Well-Known Member

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    The same thing happens to us every year, we scramble to find a person willing to swath and bale our hay ground. This year we found a farmer that also raises cattle, and for two thirds of the hay crop he swathed and bailed, and we delivered.We got a total of thirteen and a half tons off of about eight acres, that left us plenty of hay to feed our critters, in fact I may even sell some in Febuary. Is there money in hay? Towards the end of winter it seems pretty expensive. So the long and the short of it is, see if you can find a local farmer that will split the crop with you. Another option that I have been thinking about is buying all the haying equipment, and becoming that reliable guy that will hay up your field for a reasonable price. Okay so that's not so much an option as it is a dream. Good luck.