Haybale construction

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Valduare, Sep 12, 2005.

  1. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    the way im talkin about no threat of molding if you dont let it get rained on before instalation. its plaster covered and fire retardant.
     
  2. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

    Messages:
    1,607
    Joined:
    May 8, 2002
    Location:
    central New South Wales, Australia
    You won't find many pictures of durable or long-standing hay buildings. Hay is food. Cut green and dried to feed animals. If you put food such as hay out, something will eat it. Not a good idea to build gingerbread cottages or anything else out of food.

    If you build out of hay then rodents or mould will eat it. If it gets wet it will start to decay, heat up and burn.

    Straw is inert, like wood. The stiff stalks left standing after the grain has ripened and been removed. You build from bales of straw .
     

  3. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    if you research tests done it show's that haybale homes are superior to stick frame homes. including flamability
     
  4. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,274
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2003
    Location:
    Colorado
    Straw and Hay are bug food. Termites will find either if the moisture content exceeds 14%. "Superior" is a value judgement since the straw/hay is only the walls. While attractive homes can be made from these products, the true test comes over time as problems occur. A common problem with any construction has to do with moisture. A whole house takes so much straw or hay that it is very difficult to keep it dry through the construction process. People who are strawbale advocates have blinders on and rarely listen to criticism of the technique. It is definitely not cheaper, nor easier to build. If it were so durable, they would all still be standing. It is certain that hay has problems which straw does not. Lack of flammability isn't due to the use of straw or hay, but the coating which covers it.

    If you can keep the straw/hay dry, you can keep newspaper dry. Newspaper is free and can be used in the same manner as straw or hay. It can be bundled and stacked and covered with plaster/stucco. Somehow, the romance of the straw overwhelms many.
     
  5. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    there are centry old haybale buildings still in use today.
     
  6. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    6 to 8 acres of hay to make a small home.
     
  7. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    some 200,000 tons were burnt last year of hay as agricultural waist
     
  8. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    704
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Western NY
    Valduare I think Don is right, you don't make homes from Hay, it's Strawbale Houses not haybale houses. And yes they do burn strawfields up, but again I think it's Strawbale you are thinking of. If you have a link to a haybale house I'd be interested to read it. If you do a search for Strwbale on this site you will find many leads.

    Carol K
     
  9. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    haybale is the term i've always heard where im from in washington state

    this thread is to post pic's of that style of construction anyways :) so everyone post your fav pic's please.
     
  10. Thatch

    Thatch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    368
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Valduare,

    There is a difference, strawbale is the correct term but it is a mistake that is made often as most folks see no difference in straw and hay. However, hay is food, straw is "food legs" (sticks that food once stood on, like wheat stalks). Straw is much drier than hay and provides little food for pests. It is also a right pain to attempt to plaster hay bales. The stiff sharp ends of straw take and hold plasters (be they earth, lime or even the dreaded concrete) easily where as hay becomes a tangled mass that is very tough to get a good bond with.

    That being said, I'm more of a cob man myself, but there are several strawbale buildings I like, many tend to be from the Canelo project folks and most of them tend to because of their interior and plaster work.... like these....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I probably like these because of their similarity to cob and the smoothing of the often too rectilinear lines of typical strawbale homes. More often than not strawbale homes are big boxes, like thick stick built homes and don't appeal aestheticly to me, the Steens fix that issue for me on many of their projects.

    J
     
  11. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    one trick before plastering is to take a weed wacker and give the bale wall a hair cut to trim it back to nice tight uniform wall. makes for MUCH easyer plastering work.

    i am wondering. the technique you can use for hanging greenboard in bathrooms is to screw lath into the plaster and use that for hanging the greenboard on. could you use that same principal on the exterior of the building to hang any type of siding or outside finnish you wish.
     
  12. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,180
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2004
    Location:
    WI
    You want the plaster/stucco to be tightly bonded to the straw (NOT HAY!!!) as this is part of what makes it fire resistant, the lack of space for air to circulate between the coating and the straw. Covering the straw wall with somekind of board or sheet material would leave air spaces whereever the straw surface wasn't perfectly flat.
     
  13. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    112
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    the lath and board go on over the plaster. i seen it on a site
     
  14. SolarGary

    SolarGary Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,495
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Location:
    Montana