Hay nets are dangerous

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Caprice Acres, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    I'm down to 8 goats again. I just lost a doe, Ester, strangled in a hay net. And almost lost my Alpine doe, she was dragging a hay net around her neck; Thank goodness it pulled loose. I assumed that they would be safe, as they hay drops down and they had no reason to put thier heads into the net. Now, I'm not to upset over this doe emotionally, because she wasn't very friendly at all, and I planned on selling her after she kidded this year. Now, I'm extremely mad that she had to die such a horrible way, in something I assumed would be safe for them; I had never heard of anything dieing in a hay net. We just buried her in our garden. She was the first kid born on our farm, along with her sister. The herd is in uproar. Her mother is looking for her, her sister is terrified, and none of the goats will go near where she died, in thier stall.
    Just thought I should let everyone know that hay nets are bad news. Not just for horned goats, which Ester was, but dehorned as well; Heidi, my alpine, is dehorned and she was dragging the net around by her neck today.

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  2. trob1

    trob1 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for your loss. Hay nets imo are for supervised use only, like at shows. Goats are so nosey they get their head in everything.
     

  3. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm so sorry you had to discover this the hard way. Yes, those nets are dangerous and I won't have them around for this very reason. We almost lost a doe to a haynet our first year with goats. Net went to the trash barrel and we haven't seen one since. Just not worth the risk in my opinion. :shrug:
     
  4. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    So sorry for your loss. No use blaming yourself, anything a goat can get its head into, it can strangle in.. I know people who swear by haynets and have never had a problem. Don't beat yourself up, accidents happen.
     
  5. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I just saw this thread on New Posts...I worry about hay nets with my horses and I use hay bags instead. Would those work for goats? you can find them at most tack stores but you can also see them at statelinetack.com
     
  6. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    I use hay bags for my goats, there's a lady near here to makes them. She also makes great goat coats. Nice lady, supports our county 4H by providing some of these items to class winners.

    http://www.gotcha-covered.net/
     
  7. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, they are sold for goats too. They do work better and more safely than nets. I still prefer the portable metal feeders that hang on the side of the pen for something like shows, etc. though. For anything permenent, I feed through a cattle panel or build a wooden manger.
     
  8. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Doc, I also use Mary's for my herd, both at shows (red and black are my show colors) but also in the infant baby barn. Even the ones in Jefferspet.com are wonderful.

    I make sure my customers know that haybags are not allowed at shows out here, they can borrow hay bags from me until theirs come in. I also tell folks at shows about the dangers of them...yep I am as bad in person as I am on the internet :)

    Sorry for your loss, we have all been there...my first homegrown Jr. Champion got her head stuck in a hay feeder that I had put a bale of alfalfa in and missed one of the wires. Vicki
     
  9. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    Oh that is a shame. Out of curiosity was it a nylon hay net or a cotton one? I have used a hay net for almost 2 years now but it is a very large cotton one with very large holes. I hang it where it is only about a foot off the ground if that and so far so good. Once in a while I'll go out and one will be standing there looking at me like "could you help me with this?" as she'll have it around her neck but she is fully able to get all feet on the ground and walk around. Actually when empty the net touches the ground. But I only use it on my nonhorned goats. I wouldn't think of using it on my boers. Too risky. Now with horses I've always been told NO WAY but my colt has access to this one but doesn't seem all that interested.....he prefers the round bale. But that's just how things work around here and I know that what works for one isn't always the best way but just the way that seems to work good for them. I'm so sorry for the loss..... is that a ND? Very pretty. I never really saw one till this sept and they are actually adorable. I'm not a huge pygmy fan (sorry don't hate me just never been around one that respected fences and cars haha!) and always thought that's all they were but no........ they're just shrunk big little goats! HAHA!!
     
  10. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    It's not cotton or nylon, it's kinda like that plastic-y rope stuff... Not sure what it's called.

    And she is a miniature goat. Mostly pygmy, but I believe there to be some sort of ND in her somewhere, possibly...
     
  11. rranch

    rranch Well-Known Member

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    Geez what a horible thing to have happen. I'm so sorry for you. Tragic deaths are so awful. I don't use hay nets either but do use the horse hay bags at shows only. I have had a couple of friends lose goats to metal feeders too though. Just freak accidents I guess.
     
  12. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    I've used those ones you're talking about mygoat and had terrible luck with them. Just too harsh if one got a foot or something in them. These cotton ones are great. Never broke or hurt anyone so far.

    Your goat is so cute! I would have thought ND but guess I ain't no mini expert huh? HAAHA!
     
  13. seanmn

    seanmn Well-Known Member

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    Yes, There curious nature gets them into all sorts of trouble, its always disheartening to lose or have one get injured because of it....my friend even had a kid break its leg from the netting used to hold together a round bale of hay.
     
  14. prairiecomforts

    prairiecomforts Well-Known Member

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    I am so sorry for your loss. It is hard to lose an animal any way - but when it is a freak accident, it is even harder. Last spring, we had a doe hang herself in a gate chain (it had been latched a little lose) and I spend some time beating myself up it. I felt just awful! My dad finally just told me a story about when he was a kid and losing a prize winning bull and said - accidents happen to everyone - it is just important that we learn from it! Sorry again for your loss.
     
  15. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, freak deaths happen. We lost a Junior herdsire bull calf when the cows pushed a bale on top of him. We found him and his body was still warm. :Bawling: Also, the dairy where we worked lost a full grown Holstien milk cow to her hanging her head in a farm gate and breaking her neck!!
     
  16. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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  17. PygmyLover

    PygmyLover nigerian & pygmy breeder

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  18. R.

    R. Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for sharing this info. I had been looking into getting a hay net, since my goats are such messy eaters. Now I know not to get them.
     
  19. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

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    Our 4-H folks won't allow them for horses or goats. I revived one of my babies the first year I had them after she hung herself - I was very lucky. And the net wasn't that high. They get tangled. Just discard them or use them for YOUR kids basketballs, gloves, footballs, etc.

    NO on using them for ANY animal... I keep having folks give them to me. I figure I have enough to make 10 hammocks (if I can figure out how to link them all together)...

    Again. No. And Vicki? I would tell anyone I SEE using them to just DON'T.

    They are killers.