Hay cutting ?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by rwzzz, Apr 26, 2006.

  1. rwzzz

    rwzzz Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    Quick question, I drive by a dairy farm in NE Pa. They grow a lot of corn and timothy hay for feed. Today I noticed that they had cut what looks like timothy but they cut it when it was only maybe 2 to 3ft tall. They usually don't cut the stuff till its like 4 to 5ft in June. Before they cut it it was very green and looked like thick grass. Any ideas?

    thanks
    Bob Z
    Ne Pa
     
  2. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Well-Known Member

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    They were probably cutting for "green chop" as my dairy farmer Uncle used to call it. They cut the grass, blow it into a feeder wagon and feed it to the stock.

    Stacy
     

  3. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    Dunno unless it has something to do with the very severe hay shortage.
     
  4. Hammer4

    Hammer4 Well-Known Member

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  5. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Are you sure it's timothy? Not a great Dairy cow feed. Alfalfa will cut 4 times maybe even 5 in PA, and be much higher protein.
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It is very likely wheat. There's a 3000 cow dairy here that is mowing rye today to chop tommorow to put in big plastic tubes about 12 feet in diameter and a couple hundred feet long. They will plant soybeans in this ground for a cash crop. They put corn silage in humongus bunker silos in the fall. They have a great many fields of alfalfa that they either put up as green chop if the weather isn't dry enough to cure it for the large square bales of hay. These bales are 36" x 36" and 8' long. Most of their crops are on cash rented ground. They buy all the wheat straw they can get, and grind it up to mix with the corn silage and wheatlage. All the salt, minerals, and protien supplement is mixed with this to create a complete feed for the cows that stay in big free stall barns.